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Thread: Double Leading Tone

  1. #1
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    Double Leading Tone

    When is a double leading tone used ?

    Why does doubling the leading tone do ?

    How do i resolve a Double leading tone?

  2. #2
    Latin Wedding Band Los Boleros's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brent
    When is a double leading tone used ?
    one example of a double leading tone is when the dominant chord of a major key is played as an augmented chord and then resolves into the tonic chord.
    Quote Originally Posted by brent
    Why does doubling the leading tone do ?
    I believe that it helps to fortifie the feeling of rest and resolution.
    Quote Originally Posted by brent
    How do i resolve a Double leading tone?
    Leading tones resolve upward by a half step.

    Example:

    Gaug-C

    notes of these two chords are:
    G/B/D# and C/E/G

    the B note leads upward and resolves to C
    The D# leads upward and resolves to E
    The G stays the same
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    Thanks for the information

    double leading tone is when the dominant chord of a major key is played as an augmented chord and then resolves into the tonic chord.

    How does the Dominant Chord get played like a Augmented chord?

    Do you mean when Doubling the leading tone of the dominant chord its like
    a augmented chord?

  4. #4
    Latin Wedding Band Los Boleros's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brent
    Do you mean when Doubling the leading tone of the dominant chord its like
    a augmented chord?
    No, In this case, when I say Dominant Chord, I mean the fifth chord of the scale. As in the key of C, the Dominant chord would be G or G7. This is obtained by starting on C and counting to five. The Dominant chord is usually shown as V or V7.
    Quote Originally Posted by brent
    How does the Dominant Chord get played like a Augmented chord?
    Now to make a chord an augmented chord means to take a major chord and raise the fifth note by a half step. In this case, the notes for a regular G chord are: G,B,D By raising the D to D# we get a Gaug chord, G,B,D#

    Quote Originally Posted by brent
    double leading tone is when the dominant chord of a major key is played as an augmented chord and then resolves into the tonic chord.
    No, A leading tone is when a note of a dominant chord resolves into a note of a tonic chord by leading up by a half step.
    This is the case when a regular G chord resolves to a C chord. The B note of the G chord is a leading tone which resolves to the C note of the C chord.
    Double leading tone means it happens with two notes, as with the Augmented Dominant chord example.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Los Boleros
    Double leading tone means it happens with two notes, as with the Augmented Dominant chord example.
    I presume you mean B resolving to C and D# resolving to E...because you would never double the 7th degree.

    I got a question: what about something like a G7#5. With an added 7th, is it possible to 'properly' resolve that without creating two 3rds?

    I need to brush up on these rules as they are starting to creep up in playing situations.

  6. #6
    Jazzman Poparad's Avatar
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    That's an interesting one, but the easy answer is G7#5 isn't really part of baroque harmony. The more and more complex the chords get, and the further away you get from baroque haromony, the less and less you have to adhere to part writting rules. Baroque music wasn't all that into altered dominants.

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    like a G7#5. With an added 7th, is it possible to 'properly' resolve that without creating two 3rds?

    I think it will resolve in parallel motion most jazz chords are resolved in parallel motion i think

  8. #8
    Jazzman Poparad's Avatar
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    There is a great deal of parallel motion in jazz. If you use strict baroque voice leading rules in 4 part harmony, you will always end up with two thirds (which is allowed).

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    two thirds (which is allowed).

    Why isn't that a parallel 8 to have two thirds? i guess its allowed because its the Leading tones of the chords the 3rd and 7ths

    Jazz using alot of parrallel 3rds and 7ths leading tones to connect chords to

    I guess Bach said it was ok also to have parallel motion with two leading tones or two 3rds?

  10. #10
    Jazzman Poparad's Avatar
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    Jazz doesn't use standard voice leading rules. In fact it blatantly breaks a lot of them, so don't try to apply standard voice leading to jazz, because you will just run into way too many examples that ignore the boroque voice leading rules. After all, it's jazz, not boroque.

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    Quote Originally Posted by silent-storm
    I presume you mean B resolving to C and D# resolving to E...because you would never double the 7th degree.

    I got a question: what about something like a G7#5. With an added 7th, is it possible to 'properly' resolve that without creating two 3rds?

    I need to brush up on these rules as they are starting to creep up in playing situations.
    The most common resolution for a dominant 7th in root position to its respective tonic is by tripling the root. No, there's no way to get the fifth into the chord. The only way to get a complete dom7 to a complete tonic is to invert the 7th.

    This is the fundamental reason the 5th isn't required in 7ths and their extensions (besides lacking any contribution to the tonality once you have a fourth tone; in a triad the fifth serves to strengthen and tonicize the root). By doubling the root of the 7th in place of the 5th, you can complete the cadence in perfect form with both leading tones (or tendency tones if you prefer, since the F-E (7-3) resolution is an inverted leading tone).

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    Thanks alot for the information

    I see Double leading tones mostly in Cadences, or when doubling a Diminished 7th they double the leading tone mostly

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    Quote Originally Posted by brent
    Thanks alot for the information

    I see Double leading tones mostly in Cadences, or when doubling a Diminished 7th they double the leading tone mostly
    You shouldn't... the leading tone should never be doubled in common practice harmonies, it forces a parallel octave. The diminished chords are almost always seen in first inversion, with the bass (third) doubled for exactly this reason (and that you can put the leading tone in the soprano). It's almost always, if not always, an error to double the leading tone in either the dominant or the LTC.

    Realize that there's a difference between 'leading tone' and 'tendency tone'. While the leading tone IS a tendency tone, the fourth is not a leading tone (it's an inverted leading tone, technically). Seeing both the third and the fourth isn't a doubling of the leading tone, it's the appearance of both tendency tones in a given key.

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    Thanks for helping me out so much with this

    inverted leading tone will produce parallel 8ths?

    Is the inverted leading tones bad or good?

    Because having the 4th (inverted leading tone) and 7th leading tone together seems like a double leading tone in one chord

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    No, the inverted leading tone won't. Doubling the actual LT in a key, in either the dominant or the LTC will produce consecutive octaves: G-B-D-B (as V), the upper B must move to C, and the inner B, will either move up to B (resolving the tendency tone) or down to G, which is perfectly fine for an inner voice. EXCEPT that it creates a direct fifth from a direct octave (which is a variation of consecutive octaves). It doesn't matter that the fifth is inverted:

    B/C
    B/C < parallel octaves

    B/C
    B\A\G < An interval of an octave moving to the interval of a fifth (inverted); the interposing A is irrelevant (it's non-harmonic).

    The other tendency tone being grouped with the leading tone does not create this problem, though it does create the problem of complete resolution if the fifth is in the dom7:

    B/C \
    G-G > These two form a tritone moving to a third, there's no problem here.
    F\E /
    G-C

    The problem arises specifically when the leading tone, the 7th degree of the scale, is doubled in either the dominant chord or the leading tone chord.

    In the case where there are both the leading tone and the 4th in a dominant chord or it's substitutions, it's not a doubled leading tone: The leading tone is specifically the 7th degree. It's just a chord that contains two tendency tones.

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