Welcome!
Just a few a ground rules first...

Promotion, advertising and link building is not permitted.

If you are keen to learn, get to grips with something with the willing help of one of the net's original musician forums
or possess a genuine willingness to contribute knowledge - you've come to the right place!

Register >

- Close -
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Accuracy at high speeds

  1. #1
    Registered User Unhorizon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    490

    Accuracy at high speeds

    Hey guys

    Last weekend I bought John Petrucci's book, "Rock Discipline", and have been regulary practicing the exercises with my own routine. On exercise 9(its basically a simple chromatic exercise) I've worked my speed up to about 184, but its not perfect yet. But when I play it anywhere faster than 160, I can't tell if I'm being accurate or not. When I play it, it sounds like it sounds on the cd, but I'm not sure if its perfect. How do you make sure you are playing things exact at high speeds?

    Oh yeah, and when I move the pattern to start up at the high f#(fret 14 on the low E), the pattern eventually takes me to the 20th fret on the high e, which I'm having trouble making it sound clear. Any tips on how to make notes at very high frets clear?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Resident Curmudgeon szulc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Jackson MS
    Posts
    2,223
    When you accelerate your playing you need to accelerate your thinking/hearing to match. You should NEVER play faster than you can count (or think clearly). If you are letting your mind and ear catch up with your speed you will be hearing clearly every note.
    If playing at this speed requires too much concentration then record it and listen with a critical ear. In general you need to be able to hear every note and count every noe so that you can execute the fast passages at the correct tempo and timing. Learning to play fast requires much time and patience.
    "Listen to the Spaces Between the sounds."
    Hidden Content

  3. #3
    Registered User LarryJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    566
    This is a great question, I was actually just thinking about this today cause I have the same problem.

    It seems impossible to count that fast, but I remember a trick I learned from Petrucci in the Rock Discipline dvd, or perhaps it was paul gilbert. Anyways, its tough to do, but the way they figure this out is by emphasizing the first note, so it would go ONE two three four... when they're picking they pick the first note harder than they do the other notes to help keep time/place.

  4. #4
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    6,039
    Exactly... you canīt think about single notes anymore when you are playing 16ths at 200 bpm... at least not as clearly as you think about quarter notes at 90 bpm =)
    So what you do is, you split it up into "conscious" and "subconscious" stuff. No, I donīt mean to get into too much esoterical stuff.
    What you do is you take something like the PG-lick or a fast legato-lick and you play it untily ouīre hands are about to fall off. Play it until you you do it automatically. If you work it up to a certain speed with a metronome, youīll be able to keep all notes in time better.
    Once you get to very high speeds, what you do is, just like Larry suggested, you emphasize the first note of those repeating figurs and runs. So instead of thinking about single notes, you think in "blocks", "sequences" etc.
    It also is a good exercise to emphasize that first note of each "segment", i.e. by picking it a bit harder... itīll add some cool dynamic to it, a better emphasis on the rhythm etc.
    Your hands are pulling off the lick, while your brain adds control, puts it in the right place etc.
    Eric

  5. #5
    Resident Curmudgeon szulc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Jackson MS
    Posts
    2,223
    You still need to be able to feel the correct rhythm of the line you are trying to execute even if your metrnome is only clicking on the first of several notes, otherwise your timing will be sloppy.
    I strongly suggest studying drum rudiments to help with this accelerated hearing and counting. Yes accenting the first of a group of notes is the typical way of executing phrases, but sometime you want to do accent displacement. The right answer is to learn to play all of the things you want to do fast at a slow enough pace to cleanly execute the phrases, only then should you
    attempt to increase the speed.
    Yes when the tempos get really fast you will need to abbreviate the counting to the first of every group, but the 'feel' of the correct subdivison of time should still be there even if it is too fast to count (with your mouth) your mind should be able to keep up.
    "Listen to the Spaces Between the sounds."
    Hidden Content

  6. #6
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    6,039
    Jamesī suggestion regarding studying drum rudiments is great.
    One thing that I consider quite helpful is to i.,e. use YMetronome and activate the "subdivisions" option...
    The metronome will give you the downbeats, which you can assigna certain percussion sound to. And it can play subdivisions, like i.e. six notes per beat ( for sixtuplets ), 4 notes per beat ( for 16th notes ) etc.
    Turn up the volume, take you guitar and really play along to those subdivisions. Try to hit the string at the exact same time.
    In the pic below,m you can see some example for the settings Iīd use with YMetronome.
    Say, you wanna practise the PG-Lick, 6 notes per beat ( or double the bpm and play eigth note triplets ):
    The metronome starts at 60 bpm, and plays the downbeats with the Agogo High-sound. Obviously, the first note of the lick always should occur on one of those beats. ( DU-du-du-du-du-du DU-du-du-du-du-du etc )
    The 6 notes per beat subdivisions ( 5 notes between the downbeats ) are played with the "Block Low" sound.
    The other 5 notes of that lick / sequence should occur on these block-sounds... try to really make sure youīre all in synch with the metronome.
    ( The other settings: Each minute, the tempo automatically increases by 4 bpm )
    Hope this helps
    Eric
    Attached Images Attached Images

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •