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Thread: An E Major Scale to Practice

  1. #1
    Registered User celestial's Avatar
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    Post An E Major Scale to Practice

    E Major Scale (One octave in the first pattern)

    E |--------------------------------------------------------|
    B |----------------2--4--5---------------------------------|
    G |-------1--2--4------------------------------------------|
    D |-2--4---------------------------------------------------|
    A |--------------------------------------------------------|
    E |--------------------------------------------------------|


    E Major Scale (Pattern 1)

    E |-------------------------------------------2--4--5------|
    B |----------------------------------2--4--5---------------|
    G |-------------------------1--2--4------------------------|
    D |----------------1--2--4---------------------------------|
    A |----------2--4------------------------------------------|
    E |-2--4--5------------------------------------------------|
    My guitar is my umbilical cord, every string is attached directly to my brain!- Kirk Hammet

  2. #2
    Registered User Unhorizon's Avatar
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  3. #3
    Afro-Cuban Grunge-Pop Bongo Boy's Avatar
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    I think it's useful to practice scales by beginning and ending on the tonic. Not saying it's 'right' or 'required', but only that I find it helpful for ear training.
    Last edited by Bongo Boy; 01-20-2004 at 04:50 AM.
    Pulsing the System with Confirmed Nonsense.

  4. #4
    Groovemastah DanF's Avatar
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    Really at some point running scales from tonic to tonic becomes just a finger excercise. That's why many jazzers dig modes (playing a C scale from D to D or F to F etc.) because otherwise when you are playing it can be pretty predictable that you will end up back on the tonic.

    Another thing is to try sequencing (sort of) your scales, like playing in ascending and descending 3rds, this is the type of thing that teaches you to hear tones in the scales without having all of the in-between tones to help you get there.

    Just my two cents, not that I dig the particular scale he posted.

    -Dan

    EDIT: Not to say that jazzers have cornerned the market on modal playing and stuff, that's just my perspective. Shredheads and Vai wannabes are all over that stuff too.
    "In improvised music you easily can tell who is a guitar player and who is a musician." - Maarten (fellow IBMer)

  5. #5
    Registered User Spin 2513's Avatar
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    Well yeah , every one uses modes, if they know it or not . Chord progressions usually follow an ascending or decending motion, to a root . So that is scale motion .

    Vai was the fist guitar player to talk about scales and modes , very openly,from a student perspective , and alot of that was in respect to Frank ,also, 'cause Frank wrote "Sofa #1" and "Watermelon in Easter Hay" , and some other lydian/mixolydian oriented pieces, where the melody is clearly Lydian or Mixolydian, and Steve was initially hired to write this stuff on paper , and analize it .So he really picked up on that tonality , which Van Halen was all ready using the Lydian /Mixolydian paralell tonalities alot , like in "Jamies Cryin "
    Vai really ran with it .

    Generally i think scale patterns are categorized as Position 1 and position two , Levitts "Modern Method " Position 1 being starting your scale with the middle finger and ascending , where as position 2 would be , starting with the pinky and ascending .
    and Three note per string scales are more for improvisation , and comming up with patterns on your own .

    In any style of music , ending on the 3ed or 7th of your scale always sounds good .

    those are some good patterns Celestial listed , i would probably start on the tonic , but i don't think i'd want to end on it . But , the II, IV, or V of the scale would , definately leave things up in the air , to be resolved . and then maybe throw in a riff with the 7th and root or 3ed and root , i guss .
    Last edited by Spin 2513; 01-21-2004 at 12:39 AM.

  6. #6
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
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    Interesting post, Spin.
    Satch and Vai were some of my early influences ( still are ), and I heard them talk about theory and scales a lot, which got me into the whole topic, and also made me wanna educate myself regarding theory. They combined emotion, feel, songwriting, chops and theory knowledge, which is something I looked up to.
    I learned about the sound of possibilites of modes by listening to them... Vaiīs use of lydian in "For The Love Of God", Satchīs "Summer Song" ( which sounds pretty mixolydian to me ) etc.

    Didnīt know Iommi was a studio player. Beck... well, he calls himself an "ear player", and so does Eddie VH, so I guess they didnīt consciously go "Ok, mixolydian might fit here". But even if they did it by ear, they indeed used those modes in many songs ( "Freeway Jam" is one melody I always play as an example of a cool mixolydian melody )
    Another example I like a lot would be "Feathers" by Steve Vai ( from "Archives Vol.3" ). He seems to like E lydian a lot, and uses it in this one, too

    There are quite a few songs which are good examples of how to use modes to get a special sound...
    Eric

  7. #7
    Afro-Cuban Grunge-Pop Bongo Boy's Avatar
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    I'd like to think I always have a point when I post, but of course you all know I seldom do. In this case though, I just want to say I'm in awe, as always. You guys just simply blow me away--I'm not trying to inflate your egos (and thereby insult you), I'm just saying, from an emotional perspective, I'm so overwhelmed by the fact that you are able to make these assessments of the music you've heard. It's beyond my comprehension. Again, this is just an emotional response--nothing more. I, on the one hand, am totally excited that someday I might possibly be able to understand what I hear this way...it seems so 'impressive' and unlikely that I ever could. After two YEARS, I can sometimes see major versus minor in terms of tonality. It's so embarassing. The idea that a listener can discern one mode from another is, to me, mind-boggling....and exciting. It's sort of like watching Pet Psychic.

    To you guys it may be a no-brainer. To me it's still Magic. Daunting, yet inspirational. Thanks.

    I told you I didn't have a Point, so fair warning.
    Last edited by Bongo Boy; 01-21-2004 at 05:24 AM.
    Pulsing the System with Confirmed Nonsense.

  8. #8
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    I'm with yoou mate!!
    It's amazing how some of you guys, correction most of you guys on here, can put everything they hear into a theoretical place and why this would work and why that wouldn't.
    Just really daunting, yet inspiring!
    Leah

  9. #9
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
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    Hey Bongo and Leah,

    I am glad you consider it motivating.
    The thing is, it is not absolutely vital to know all this, to know theory inside and out. Remember, we had those discussions about ear players and guy who donīt know much theory and still play and write amazing stuff.
    Eg., a folk-singer who just wants to accompany himself on the acoustic guitar while singing some folk-tunes might not really need to know about substitutions or symetrical scales.

    However, when I started playing, I took a few guitar lessons at a small school. The teacher taught us all the basic chords, like E major, A major, A minor etc.
    He never said what makes a minor chord minor, whatīs the difference between an Amaj and an Amin etc.
    Which was kinda frustrating to me ( most of the other students didnīt seem to mind ).
    So I sat down with some books and a guitar and started to learn, trying to understand chords.
    I always wanted to understand and be able to apply the theory-part. mong my favorite players were Joe Satriani and Steve Vai, and these guys talked about theory a lot, seemed to be very educated about it. Which inspired me a LOT. Cuz I felt that they used theory as a tool while still playing from the heart, focussing on songs etc.
    And I still consider it pretty interesting, even exciting, to listen to some players and figure out what theyīre doing with modes etc. I know that that isnīt the most important thing about music, but still, itīs interesting and I still learn from it.
    It takes some time, and I think you need to have the wish to understand this stuff.
    Eric

  10. #10
    Central Scrutinizer
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    While I do thinks theory's very useful (and kinna neat) it's important to bear in mind: You don't always need a roadmap to get ya to where your going.
    "All other things being equal, the simplest solution is usually the correct one." William of Occam

  11. #11
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
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    I agree, of course ( said so in one of the previous posts ), especially since some of my favorite players are "ear players" anyway ( Beck and Van Halen ).
    But of course, I gotta smart-allick... you donīt need a roadmap to get where ya going, but... a road map can
    - help you to find the shortest, quickest way to get where ya wanna go. More efficiently, without taking too many detours or wasting too much fuel ( although those detours may take you to places you wouldnīt have gone to in the first place, but like anyway )
    - A roadmap can help you to take a route through areas you wanna see... say, you wanna get from NY to LA with your car ( I know, a cliche-example, but bear with me ).
    if you donīt use a map, and you just go straight west, ask some people for directions or just go by roadsigns, you might still get there.
    But if youknow that there are beautiful places in between or just slightly off the straight road ( places like i.e. the Grand Canyon or Red Rock / AZ ), you can find those easily if youīre on your way. So you can basically visit some beautiful places while being on the way to wherever you wanna go

    But as I said, just being a smart-allick. Of course, you donīt NEED theory to make music and say something, but it can be a great tool.
    I guess we agree on that anyway
    Eric

  12. #12
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    Hi The Bash and Eric,

    Yes I do agree with you guys, theory isn't every thing, but it does help, i don't plan on trying to become as proficient as many of you guys, but I'd like to understand what I play etc.

    Leah

  13. #13
    Central Scrutinizer
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    I totally agree with that.

    Road maps are great things.
    I highly recommend them.
    Sometimes they are a bit back dated, or mis-marked and then ya gotta improvise.
    Sometimes while your improvising u get totally lost and need the ole roadmap to get ya back on track
    "All other things being equal, the simplest solution is usually the correct one." William of Occam

  14. #14
    Registered User LarryJ's Avatar
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    I'm not sure if this has been mentioned, as I stopped reading a bit in, but while going over my backing track collection today, I noticed that "Canyon of Spirits" by EricV is in Emaj. This happens to be one of the patterns I learned and playing over it, it fit better than anything else I've everplayed (usually pentatonic type scales) so I'm definitly determined to learn all my scales now.

    Try the search function, he provides a free backing track for you to play over, and this very scale will work wonderfully over it. It's like you couldn't possibly play anything that sounded bad

  15. #15
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
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    Larry,
    thanks. The URL to download the "Canyon Of Spirits" backing track is: http://www.ibreathemusic.com/forums/eric/canyonbt.mp3

    Yes, Emajor pentatonic works great over this. So does the regular E major scale. Make sure you take your time with it, try to go for nice melodies and phrasing, and put in some feel...

    In case anyone wants to see what I play over it, ( mostly pentatonics slow, arpeggio-based lines ), you can check the all-new ( low quality ) clips from last weekīs "Guitar Night" show...

    WMV-format:
    http://www.ericvandenberg.com/video/canyon2.wmv
    ( make sure you set the Windows Media Player to "100 %" or "original size" video display, that clip has a pretty small resolution and will get blurry if you zoom )

    Real Media version ( Black & White )
    http://www.ericvandenberg.com/video/cos.rm

    Eric

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