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Thread: 10 most useful guitar instructional videos for U

  1. #61
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    That's a very good point, and I think I'm an idiot for missing it myself. I remember seeing somewhere a video of John McLaughlin doing a duet with some pianist (Katia Labeque, I think) and somehow I learned more from her phrasing and the way she worked with McLaughlin (who, I should add, is a huge influence on me) than I have from most guitar videos - including several that have been listed here. Violinist Jerry Goodman (original Mahavishnu member) did the same thing somehow.

    Rock On,
    The Jeffinator

  2. #62
    Did I say that out loud ? joeyd929's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheJeffinator
    That's a very good point, and I think I'm an idiot for missing it myself. I remember seeing somewhere a video of John McLaughlin doing a duet with some pianist (Katia Labeque, I think) and somehow I learned more from her phrasing and the way she worked with McLaughlin (who, I should add, is a huge influence on me) than I have from most guitar videos - including several that have been listed here. Violinist Jerry Goodman (original Mahavishnu member) did the same thing somehow.

    Rock On,
    The Jeffinator
    Rock On,
    The Jeffinator[/QUOTE]

    Another point of watching videos and performers, for me, especially guitar players is that I always what what fingers they use. My point is if you watch Eric Clapton, he does use his fourth finger for chords and some solos but a majority of his solos utilize the first three fingers.

    Even George Benson, if you really watch close he uses his first three fingers more often then the fourth, but he has obvious command over all his fingers.

    Most teachers teach the "KFD" method, (keep fingers down) which is basically like classical training where you keep your fingers as close as possiole for the most economical and efficient movement...HOWEVER...

    Watch players like Pat Metheney or Rusty Cooley. www.rustycooley.com
    and you will notice that their fingers flail very far away from the fingerboard but it works for them.

    Yngwee Malmsteen uses ALL his fingers and as fast as he is, he pretty much repeats himself over and over, using quite basic patterns, I might add. It's just the level to which he can acquire speed that is amazing.

    As much as the technique impresses me I get quite bored after a while with that stuff. Anyway, back to watching players....So much to see and learn.....

  3. #63
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    Hi guys. Erm, I hope I don't get flamed or banned for reviving an old thread but I really need your help! I was searching the board for a topic on instructional books and DVDs and I found this thread. I love how the bad ones are also mentioned

    Birthday's coming up in a bit so instead of saving up for a guitar, I've decided to save up for guitar lesson DVDs. My schedule is pretty tight (I'm working to get through Nursing school) so a way to learn guitar that's convenient and complete is a must for me. The only DVD I have is Rock Discipline by John Petrucci which is great for building chops and exercises but it's kinda lacking in the theory department.

    I'm considering getting Learn and Master Guitar by Steve Krenz but it's pretty pricey. A lotta sites say that it's really good though. Cheaper DVDs I've looked at were Rockhouse Method and the 2007 version of Metal Method by Doug Marks also keep popping up in my research. Anybody have any suggestions?

  4. #64
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    A vital question is, what standard are you? And,…what are you aiming to learn or achieve from the DVD?

    You sort of hinted that you want something that teaches you theory…and I guess you want it to do that by learning lots of licks & phrases with the guitar in hand, ie as opposed to just learning theory on paper?

    Do you need to learn about theory & practice of which scales & modes to use for soling over various chord’s, that sort of thing? Is that want we’re talking about?

    Ian.

  5. #65
    Registered User tedmaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EricV
    Hey guys

    I was going through my box of videos yesterday, and two videos I forgot to mention that helped me a LOT, or at least I consider very very cool and helpful are the two Scott Henderson videos by REH.

    The first one is about jazz & fusion soloing... what scales and arps to use over which chord etc. He comes up with some very very cool lines there.

    The second one is even better... it´s about phrasing. And Scott really explains those well. He compares soloing to speaking ( now I guess you can see where I got that comparison from, since I studied with Scott at the MI ),a nd he explains it very well.
    Even if you are not into jazz or fusion, this might be a great inspiration for you !!! ( He also plays a lot of bluesy stuff )
    There´s some stuff in there that I haven´t seen covered in any other video, with a very unconventional approach

    That second vid inspired me greatly... it´s has a lot of the stuff Scott taught me at the MI... he´s a great teacher, a very cool, funny guy, and an amazing player.
    Maybe I should review those vids for ibreathe, huh ?
    Eric
    Finally! I'd been reading through this thread there thinking i was gonna have to be the first to post about those vids!

    tbh i'm not even sure you can still get the Scott Henderson videos in the Uk anymore, but i thought they were fantastic when i was using them years ago. The Melodic Phrasing one i found particularly great - a topic rarely covered in any detail and yet sorely lacking in the playing of so many guitar players.

    I would also recommend any of the Frank Gambale vids or books - particularly his ones on Modes and The Gambale Technique Book (which covers what scales/arps to play over which harmonies). I'm not a fan of the man's music at all but he is an excellent teacher - very concise - tells you exactly what you need to know in as simple a way as possible.

    In terms of the vids out there focused purely on physical techniques, as most others have already mentioned the Petrucci and PG one's are probably the pick of the bunch. Though Petrucci can be like watching paint dry at times! At least PG is a bit more dynamic and amusing in his presentation...
    Thren keld, wing nut, why not rheam?

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crossroads
    A vital question is, what standard are you? And,…what are you aiming to learn or achieve from the DVD?

    You sort of hinted that you want something that teaches you theory…and I guess you want it to do that by learning lots of licks & phrases with the guitar in hand, ie as opposed to just learning theory on paper?

    Do you need to learn about theory & practice of which scales & modes to use for soling over various chord’s, that sort of thing? Is that want we’re talking about?

    Ian.
    That's EXACTLY what I am talking about; in terms of technique, I am probably slightly above average but still no expert. When it comes to theory, it's pretty much zilch.

    Here are key things I want to know and learn:
    - How to find what key a song is in
    - What solo to play over a chord progression/improvisation
    - What the HELL am I playing most of the time*
    - Keys,Scales, modes, naming a chord, composition, the works
    - Playing a song by ear; being able to just "JAM".

    I have been trying to learn how to "shred" for the past year now but since I suck at theory and no where near proficient with technique, I am going no where. I have mentioned Rock Discipline though and it's helped tremendously with alternate picking (I haven't gone through the whole thing yet).

    I have no idea what to play when someone mentions "the song is in the key of _____."

    A secondary technique I've been trying to learn is fingerstlye but books don't help much since I learn best with visual aids (I've heard that 90% of people are visual learners). I have been listening to a lot of fingerstyle guitarists like Chet Atkins, Don Ross, Andy McKee, Tommy Emmanuel and John Mayer whose song "Neon" is probably the most difficult thing I can perform with fingerstyle right now.


    * I learn most of my stuff through tab or by someone teaching me; I have never played by ear though I have tried and have gotten nowhere. I know almost nothing about keys, scales and modes. I do know how to find notes on the fretboard but have no idea how to apply it.
    Last edited by pfizer; 05-23-2007 at 06:00 PM. Reason: adding something

  7. #67
    Registered User tedmaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pfizer
    That's EXACTLY what I am talking about; in terms of technique, I am probably slightly above average but still no expert. When it comes to theory, it's pretty much zilch.

    Here are key things I want to know and learn:
    - How to find what key a song is in
    - What solo to play over a chord progression/improvisation
    - What the HELL am I playing most of the time*
    - Keys,Scales, modes, naming a chord, composition, the works
    - Playing a song by ear; being able to just "JAM".
    Does it really need to be a video?

    Personally, i think if you're starting these topics at that kind of level then there's not many vids/dvd's out there that will really help you that i know of. The Gambale and Henderson stuff is excellent but imo it's geared towards players with an intermediate understanding of the topics already.

    However i do know some books that cover this stuff v. well. Guthrie Govan's Creative Guitar 1 & 2 books with cd's are fantastic and would benefit you a lot. He's an excellent teacher and player if you don't know who he is. PLenty vids on Youtube if you're interested.

    Get the books here:

    http://www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/042224/details.html

    http://www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/056088/details.html
    Last edited by tedmaul; 05-23-2007 at 06:08 PM.
    Thren keld, wing nut, why not rheam?

  8. #68
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    Like tedmaul said, if that's all you're looking for, you're probably better off getting a book. Really, any basic theory book should do it, no need to get one by a big name player. "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Music Theory" or something similar would tell you most of those things.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by pfizer
    That's EXACTLY what I am talking about ... I want to know and learn:
    - How to find what key a song is in
    - What solo to play over a chord progression/improvisation
    - What the HELL am I playing most of the time*
    - Keys,Scales, modes, naming a chord, composition, the works
    - Playing a song by ear; being able to just "JAM".
    Good, that’s precisely why I asked. And it’s exactly what I expected (because it applies to 9 out of 10 players). And in view of that, I’m going to ignore the fact that you’ve been using the Petrucci DVD, ie I’m going to assume you can’t yet play like Petrucci (for all the reason’s you list).

    OK, well I hope Russ will forgive me for mentioning the same 3 DVD’s again, but imho these are exactly what you need. I.e. - three DVD’s from Danny Gill ….1.Rock Essentials, 2.Rock Concepts, 3.Advanced Rock Guitar (they're, all from Lick Library... you can get them on-line from Musicroom.com ... no connection to me).

    The first one (“Essentials”) will give you a clear grounding in pentatonic scales & their use in soloing over chord progressions in various keys. Only you can decide if that’s too basic for you, and whether you can safely skip that one (but don’t dismiss it too lightly).

    The second DVD (“Concepts”) will extend that with more scales, scale sequences, soloing with those sequences using alt. picking, sweep picking & arpeggios to compose riff’s & licks, and that’s all set in the context of a theory explanation with solid practical examples.

    The third DVD (“Advanced”), continues the same teaching of theory & soloing, but begins by explaining Harmonization of the major scale into triads & 7th chords, and immediately goes on to modes & teaches licks & solos in each major mode ie Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian etc. The second half of the DVD deals with soloing over chords outside the Key and explains borrowed chords and Secondary Dominants.

    Danny Gill is by far the best & clearest teacher I’ve seen on any DVD, and together those three will give you a good start on theory & the application of theory to soloing & improvising with scales & modes over chords & progressions. Every note he plays is clearly explained ... and the musical ideas & licks are so good I'm surprised he's giving them away (but that's you're gain).

    Having said all that, there’s a new DVD which does more or less all of the above in one go. That is “Scales & the Chords That Fit Them” by Stuart Bull. Not surprisingly that DVD is very long, ie on 2 disks over 4 hours. The downside is that although Stewart is good teacher, he’s nowhere near as clear as Danny Gill, and because of the amount of material covered, it does not explain the basic theory & principles in the clear way that Danny Gill’s DVD’s do. The other thing is that Stuart Bull’s solo examples are not as musical or as refined as Danny’s…however the solo examples are much longer & very numerous (in many styles, inc. long jazz runs), in fact they’re so long it will take you months just to Tab them out for your own notes (there’s no Tab included in any of these DVD’s ... that's typical of all modern DVD's, none of them will include TAB, but you can clearly see everything that's played).

    Anyway, just to be clear - Stewart Bull’s DVD is all about which scales and modes to use for soling over different chords & progressions … it will not teach you a clear grounding in theory of scales & modes in the way Danny Gill does, and the DVD is not arranged or ordered in such a clear logical way, so it will seem more like hard work, but if you stick with it & untangle it a bit then it will provide a lot of what you want in a single product.... and it does contain masses of stuff.

    There’s much more I could mention, inc. various books & CD’s etc., but for what you want, I think the above 4 are really the bottom line (& frankly, they’re bargains).

    Ian.
    Last edited by Crossroads; 05-23-2007 at 09:02 PM.

  10. #70
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    Yep, also agree with Tedmaul about those two books/CD’s from Guthrie Govan & I’ve recommended those myself on previous threads here (although DVD’s obviously have big advantage of seeing exactly what the guy is talking about, they're more direct ...but Guthrie's stuff is great for long term reference and loads of modern excercises etc.)

    Ian.

  11. #71
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    Okay guys, thanks for the responses. I'll be sure to check out Guthrie Govan's books and LickLibrary.

    I might not be able to post for a while so I'm going to ask about some things now before I forget

    1) Do you have any opinions on the other DVDs I mentioned previously (Rockhouse and Metal Method)? Somebody is offering me copies of the DVDs but since money is really tight right now, I have to make sure of the quality before I buy. I know that Metal Method has been around for quite some time now since I see ads for it in guitar magazines. I just haven't seen any reviews of it or anybody who testifies to learning from it (exept for that one guy, shredder Rusty Cooley whose music is a bit too mechanical for my taste). Rockhouse Method is said to be one of the best selling instructionals today and even got a favorable review in Musician'sFriend.com but I still want to know what you guys think since the full guitar course from Beginner to Advanced will still set me back quite a bit. Learn and Master Guitar looks very good but its kinda pricey. Any opinions on that?

    2) As for books, I found three that I think would be best suited for my needs: Fretboard Logic by Bill Edwards, Guitar Fretboard Workbook by Barrett Tagliarino and MJS Total Scales and Applications by Mark J. Sternal keep popping up when I search on Google or musician websites. It keeps talking about CAGED which I know is something used to memorize the fretboard. Do the Guthrie Govan books teach something like that as well?
    Last edited by pfizer; 05-24-2007 at 02:41 PM. Reason: adding

  12. #72
    Wannabe Shred-pop Maestro Mandz's Avatar
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    1) i have two different versions of metal method (i bought them all - just cos i am a completist and wanted them all) and they are not bad at all. very clear, though i am not a fan of the tabledit software it uses for tabs. the theory section (dvd 6 in the latest version i think - just got mine 2 days ago) covers theory mainly as it applies to rock. mention is made of different scales and how to make them and how to construct chords but it is made clear that unless you want to play music other than rock/metal, you will probably not use many of them. actually, it really is a good method.

    learn and master guitar is good, and worth the money, but it is a course which you need to sit through and master one step at a time. its not good for just dipping into. that said, if you're a beginner, i would recommend it highly. it teaches you how to read music as well.

    rockhouse, i have one of their dvds, which was just finger excercises. i don't think it is all that good since it doesn't really make much mention of what practice is or how to do it effectively.

    i personally would recommend the lick library dvds. i thoroughly agree with Crossroads on that score. the danny gill dvds are the best IMHO. there are some technique vids on the website you can stream by Guthrie Govan which are fantastic. the new metal licks dvds are not bad either.

    i wish they would tab out the examples though, cos clear as they are on-screen, sometimes you don't want to have to have to watch the dvd just to practice some licks/excercises.

    2) the guthrie govan books do cover the same material (and in a more engaging way if you ask me)
    Last edited by Mandz; 05-31-2007 at 03:52 PM.

  13. #73
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    Yeah I agree – I’d also like full printed TAB with those Lick Library DVD’s. But it needs to be clearly laid out on A4 format, not like the scruffy little booklets that come with the rather useless Hot Licks series, & I guess a decent A4 Tab book would probably double the cost of the DVD?

    I’m also really enjoying Chris Juergensen’s book, which is gives a very comprehensive breakdown of chords & chord construction in the context of progressions, plus an in depth look at scales & modes in the context of soling applications…the whole thing is very much directed at setting the work in a musical context rather than just presenting diagrams and facts for reference…it’s passing on a lifetimes knowledge & it clearly shows. I don’t think it’s really for complete beginners, but it’s great for anyone who’s serious about playing (makes a perfect partner to the 2 books from Guthrie Govan)

    But one other thing I should add – good as all these modern DVDs & new books are (and they are fantastic), I’d still rather have a good personal teacher whatever the cost, but unfortunately I just can’t seem to find one (even in London) .


    Ian.
    Last edited by Crossroads; 05-31-2007 at 06:12 PM.

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crossroads
    Yeah I agree – I’d also like full printed TAB with those Lick Library DVD’s. But it needs to be clearly laid out on A4 format, not like the scruffy little booklets that come with the rather useless Hot Licks series, & I guess a decent A4 Tab book would probably double the cost of the DVD?

    I’m also really enjoying Chris Juergensen’s book, which is gives a very comprehensive breakdown of chords & chord construction in the context of progressions, plus an in depth look at scales & modes in the context of soling applications…the whole thing is very much directed at setting the work in a musical context rather than just presenting diagrams and facts for reference…it’s passing on a lifetimes knowledge & it clearly shows. I don’t think it’s really for complete beginners, but it’s great for anyone who’s serious about playing (makes a perfect partner to the 2 books from Guthrie Govan)

    But one other thing I should add – good as all these modern DVDs & new books are (and they are fantastic), I’d still rather have a good personal teacher whatever the cost, but unfortunately I just can’t seem to find one (even in London) .


    Ian.
    I'm having the very same problem with teachers here. All of them are either just looking for a quick buck or just plain suck.

    I think I'll go for the Lick Library series. Besides the Rock series with Danny Gill, are there any other DVDs from LL that you can recommend?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mandz
    1) i have two different versions of metal method (i bought them all - just cos i am a completist and wanted them all) and they are not bad at all. very clear, though i am not a fan of the tabledit software it uses for tabs. the theory section (dvd 6 in the latest version i think - just got mine 2 days ago) covers theory mainly as it applies to rock. mention is made of different scales and how to make them and how to construct chords but it is made clear that unless you want to play music other than rock/metal, you will probably not use many of them. actually, it really is a good method.

    learn and master guitar is good, and worth the money, but it is a course which you need to sit through and master one step at a time. its not good for just dipping into. that said, if you're a beginner, i would recommend it highly. it teaches you how to read music as well.

    rockhouse, i have one of their dvds, which was just finger excercises. i don't think it is all that good since it doesn't really make much mention of what practice is or how to do it effectively.

    i personally would recommend the lick library dvds. i thoroughly agree with Crossroads on that score. the danny gill dvds are the best IMHO. there are some technique vids on the website you can stream by Guthrie Govan which are fantastic. the new metal licks dvds are not bad either.

    i wish they would tab out the examples though, cos clear as they are on-screen, sometimes you don't want to have to have to watch the dvd just to practice some licks/excercises.

    2) the guthrie govan books do cover the same material (and in a more engaging way if you ask me)
    Hey dude, thanks for answering my questions. Question about the Govan books though; aside from scales and modes, does it teach chord progressions too? The first 2 volumes of Fretboard Logic apparently doesn't teach it.

  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by pfizer
    Besides the Rock series with Danny Gill, are there any other DVDs from LL that you can recommend?
    The short answer is - I think you’re pretty safe with anything from Lick Library.

    Long answer - different people may prefer different products of course, I mean maybe some guys won’t like the Lick Library DVD’s or won’t like Danny Gill’s teaching (I think that’s unlikely). So, just be sure you know what's on those 3 DVD's from Gill - they're teaching basic theory of scales, keys, modes, chords & progressions, and it's all about how to solo with those ideas. Although 3 titles say "Rock", the licks inc. plenty of blues phrases (as does all rock) and also plenty of faster metal/shred style licks.

    But a great deal depends on the teacher. Eg, I also like their 2 Steve Vai DVD’s, which cover all the stuff from Eat em & Smile., taught by Gill, Guthrie Govan, & Dave Killminster … Gill & Govan are fine, but personally I don’t like Killmister (he’s not so clear, and he annoys me lol!).

    Actually, the two main LL teachers are Stewart Bull & Jamie Humphries. They’re both OK, but not as clear & precise as Gill. E.g. Bull has a recent 4 hour double DVD which covers a huge amount of material on soloing with scales & modes against various chords/progressions … it’s great if you need to learn that stuff (how to solo), but it’s hard work compared to Gill’s DVD’s simply because Bull is less clear and his material isn’t so well organized ... but that DVD is still a great buy if you’re prepared to work a bit harder on it.

    Just to mention some other publishers - the Classic Masterclass series are all priced under Ł10 and whilst they’re much shorter and not so clear as LL, some of them do have collections of great licks. Eg I like Wolf Marshall’s one on Yngwie Malmsteen…Marshall looks pretty crazy, and the playing is fast of course, but it has loads of great sounding licks if you like neo-classical shred stuff. Also the Signature Licks series from Hal Leonard, which are DVD versions of their well known songbooks/CD’s covering various famous players in some detail, eg Scott Ainslie has a very good, albeit short, DVD on Robert Johnson’s acoustic blues style (impressive presentation from Ainslie).

    Also - the Joe Satriani DVD from Cherry Lane publishing is really excellent with 6 titles nfn on two disks, but surprise surprise that’s also taught by Gill and was even made in association with Lick Lib lol! Anyway, if you like Satriani, then that’s a terrific DVD (it’s all teaching, no time wasted on performance footage).

    Finally 2 other titles I like, but really for more advanced players (don’t say I didn’t warn you lol) – Paul Gilbert “Get Out of My Yard” in which he describes his approach to songwriting and lick construction for the titles on that album. And Robben Ford “The Blues and Beyond”, which covers his style of Blues-jazz fusion (so expect lots of strange jazz chords lol).

    Ian.

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