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Thread: 10 most useful guitar instructional videos for U

  1. #46
    Registered User NickGT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-string
    Here is a free Marty Friedman video lesson:

    http://www.freelicks.net/Valley_of_eternity1.htm

    If by lesson you mean "hey, watch me play this" then yes.
    I'm a gangster. Hidden Content

  2. #47
    Hacked Account widdly widdly's Avatar
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    My favourites are..

    Paul Gilbert - Intense Rock II - Spent a whole summer in front of this one. Really great stuff and good fun.

    Tuck Andress - Fingerstyle Jazz Guitar - This one is a real mind blower. You really have to see him play a "Man in a Mirror", it's amazing. This video will keep you going for years. Each little section will take you months to master. Tuck is really humble and is a great teacher. This guy is better than Shawn Lane and George Lynch put together

    All the Frank Gambale videos are great too. The only trouble is Frank's wardrobe. He really needs a stylist

    The ones I really don't like are...

    Zakk Wylde - Pentatonic Wankfest -
    Zakk comes across as a complete wanker. Too much attitude not enough education.

    Yngwie Malmsteen - Everything Too Fast
    - Yngwie plays everything too fast. It's like he is scared you might learn all his riffs, buy some tight pants and put him out of buisness.
    ________
    Bdsm punishment
    Last edited by widdly widdly; 04-11-2011 at 07:03 AM.

  3. #48
    Frequent Jammer JailHouseRock's Avatar
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    I plan to get Marty Friedman, Exotic Metal Guitar or Melodic Control.
    Which one would be a better choice?
    The Mystical Potato Head Groove Thing

  4. #49
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    Definitely Melodic Control. If you can't use odd note groupings and odd scales, or don't like your phrasing, or something along those lines, get them both. Melodic Control was put out after EMG, which was from his Cacophony days, whereas Melodic Control came out after Countdown to Extinction, and by this time not only was his playing more recognizable, he was able to put his points across better.

    Rock On,
    The Jeffinator

  5. #50
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
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    I guess its the same as with choosing a teacher... some teachers you click with, some you donīt. Some people love Rock Discipline, others didnīt consider it useful. To me, that one is a good video... not as flashy as some of the REH videos ( which to me often seemed to be more of a promo-video. Greg Howe said that he wasnīt given enough time to prepare his vid thoroughly, for example )
    The good thing about RD is that John shows you how to use a metronome, actually demonstrates it. Many of the licks in those REH vids are played without.

    Iīd like to point out that I think the following: You should get one video at first, and then really work with that. The first one I got was "Intense Rock" ( still recommend it a lot ), and back then, I just didnīt have the money to buy 3 more the next week.
    And that vid had a lot of stuff to work on, so I spent weeks and months with it until I bought something else.
    The same thing that is true for books is true for videos: If you get too many of them at a time, you might find yourself skipping from one to the next, never really working with or focussing on one of them.
    Variety is good, but if you i.e. work with IR, the licks build onto each other. So if you watch IR, a Gambale vid, a Friedman vid and "Rock Chops" in one day, you might have some new ideas, but you donīt have a starting point.
    Focus on one thing for a while before switching to the next
    Eric

  6. #51
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    One video no-one has mentioned is Tony Macalpine's Master Session. Tony's shows some great licks including his unique hammer on from nowhere sweeps and his slap style! His picking is also really clean!

    The only place i can find these vids everyone is tlking about is sheetmusicplus.com. ne1 know of somewhere cheaper that ships to england?

    what were shawn lanes vids like? are they more instructional or motivational?

    cheers
    duncan

  7. #52
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    Amazon should have them - I know they have Rock Discipline, I've seen Marty Friedman's videos on there, and Paul Gilbert stuff is everywhere. I'm surprised that other stores don't, but it can't be helped.

    What I like about Rock Discipline, Intense Rock, and Melodic Control is that they are much more than lick videos, which Macalpine's video seems to be in more ways than not - it's more about having a bigger trick bag at the end of the video than really advancing and bringing new *concepts* in, like the first three.

    Shawn Lane's videos were very motivational *and* instructional (in the aforementioned *advancing* sense, not just cool licks). His was an entirely new approach, and rather than just having the viewer play the same licks he played he focused on incorporating all sorts of different elements and 'little things' that noone else would have thought of in a million years - even doing a descending 4 note coil run, he would go between picking and legato in ways that made no sense to anyone who wasn't writing it down, and rather than sounding like either an exercise or a Malmsteen rip-off he made it sound like it was all just coming out of thin air and not an elementary, rudimentary dexterity routine.

    Rock On,
    The Jeffinator

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by JGuitar
    Both really good videos with great info... but, you will have to develop a lot of speed to make a lot of the info contained in them usable.
    How much speed?

  9. #54
    Did I say that out loud ? joeyd929's Avatar
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    Unsung shred hero..

    Check out this link. http://www.jimibell.com/

    Jimi Bell came in second to Zak Wylde in 1986 for the Ozzy audition. Check out some of his shred videos at his site.. Gotta use Internet Explorer. One video is from 1985 of him doing a solo at the 1985 NAMM show in California..

    He lives in Connecticut, about 10 miles from me now and I used to go to the music store where he worked to watch and drool. He most plays locally now but he is an unsung hero of shred...fo sho. I just can't afford the 40 bucks an hour for lessons.

    Joe

  10. #55
    Registered User Crucifix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by widdly widdly
    My favourites are..

    Yngwie Malmsteen - Everything Too Fast - Yngwie plays everything too fast. It's like he is scared you might learn all his riffs, buy some tight pants and put him out of buisness.
    I fell off the chair reading this, great stuff.

  11. #56
    Did I say that out loud ? joeyd929's Avatar
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    Technique but not the music

    Quote Originally Posted by Crucifix
    I fell off the chair reading this, great stuff.
    If I had the technique that Yngwee has, I would love that but I HATE the music he uses. I would use that technique for Jazz or classical.

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by widdly widdly

    The ones I really don't like are...

    Zakk Wylde - Pentatonic Wankfest -
    Zakk comes across as a complete wanker. Too much attitude not enough education.

    Yngwie Malmsteen - Everything Too Fast
    - Yngwie plays everything too fast. It's like he is scared you might learn all his riffs, buy some tight pants and put him out of buisness.
    Agree with the top one - not much into ZW at all. His tone bugs me more than most people's tones usually do. Now that I think about it, I never got into the Rhoads tone either - too much fuzz, teddy bears just aren't that metal.

    As for the bottom one, I might have agreed if it weren't for all of the clones that completely failed to put him out of business. There seems to be a 'right' speed for most licks - just take a look at the all-too-common four note cluster that everyone knows (1234 2345 3456 and the other way around). At slow speeds it sounds like an exercise, at moderate speeds it has its place, at higher speeds it kinda goes back to sounding like an exercise. Turning again to all of the neoclassical clones, we see how tiring it gets, but then looking at how Shawn Lane did it, or how Arch Enemy put it to use in Ravenous, or how Yngwie throws it in on offbeats, it shows itself to have use. Same goes for the same old pentatonic licks that everyone has been using since the birth of blues - slowly they sound soulful, moderate to high speeds they can be used well in a more rock/metal context (think Judas Priest), too high and they're a mess. I don't think he has much of anything to be afraid of - he just wants the licks to sound like he thinks they should, and since they're not really that hard to figure out once you get used to him, I can't see where the problem is.

    Rock On,
    The Jeffinator


  13. #58
    Did I say that out loud ? joeyd929's Avatar
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    Ing-Vay (Yngwee)

    Quote Originally Posted by TheJeffinator
    Agree with the top one - not much into ZW at all. His tone bugs me more than most people's tones usually do. Now that I think about it, I never got into the Rhoads tone either - too much fuzz, teddy bears just aren't that metal.

    As for the bottom one, I might have agreed if it weren't for all of the clones that completely failed to put him out of business. There seems to be a 'right' speed for most licks - just take a look at the all-too-common four note cluster that everyone knows (1234 2345 3456 and the other way around). At slow speeds it sounds like an exercise, at moderate speeds it has its place, at higher speeds it kinda goes back to sounding like an exercise. Turning again to all of the neoclassical clones, we see how tiring it gets, but then looking at how Shawn Lane did it, or how Arch Enemy put it to use in Ravenous, or how Yngwie throws it in on offbeats, it shows itself to have use. Same goes for the same old pentatonic licks that everyone has been using since the birth of blues - slowly they sound soulful, moderate to high speeds they can be used well in a more rock/metal context (think Judas Priest), too high and they're a mess. I don't think he has much of anything to be afraid of - he just wants the licks to sound like he thinks they should, and since they're not really that hard to figure out once you get used to him, I can't see where the problem is.

    Rock On,
    The Jeffinator
    I think the thing that made Yngwee unique is his choice of melodic phrasing. Others have played fast..Jeff Gilbert, Vinnie Moore, etc.. But Yngwee had as you said, the right speed. I saw him play with Alcatraz in the 80's from front row and it was bizarre to see someone play that fast..and inspiring. Makes you want to either go home and play or trash your guitar.

  14. #59
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    People that are posting that they didn't pick up anything from videos are wrong. Even if you don't set down and learn every lick note by note, you (I will almost guarentee) the you will emulate what you have seen or go about doing your favorite little lick a little bit differently. I can say that I have always gone about emulating a (cioto? Some type of japense/chinese instrument that is kinda like a 12 string. Every note is also followed by the octave of the note higher. Kyoto or something like that) By sounding the lower note, tapping the higher octave, switch note, tap, switch note, tap, ect. But I saw john petrucci doing it as a "chord". He would play the lower note and then while sustaining it, play the higher note in the standard octave position. It emulated it alot better then I was with just tapping, and since they are the same note different octave, you don't have to worry about the distorion causing overtone "clutter". This wasn't even on an "instructional" video, just on the scenes from a memory dvd.

    The point is that whether they are teaching you or not, you can learn from them. Watch what they do, how they group notes, do they use octave displacement? If you want to learn you will. Just don't expect to learn everything at once. That is what practice is for, and its worked for centuries

  15. #60
    Did I say that out loud ? joeyd929's Avatar
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    Watching videos

    Quote Originally Posted by newamerikangosp
    People that are posting that they didn't pick up anything from videos are wrong. Even if you don't set down and learn every lick note by note, you (I will almost guarentee) the you will emulate what you have seen or go about doing your favorite little lick a little bit differently. I can say that I have always gone about emulating a (cioto? Some type of japense/chinese instrument that is kinda like a 12 string. Every note is also followed by the octave of the note higher. Kyoto or something like that) By sounding the lower note, tapping the higher octave, switch note, tap, switch note, tap, ect. But I saw john petrucci doing it as a "chord". He would play the lower note and then while sustaining it, play the higher note in the standard octave position. It emulated it alot better then I was with just tapping, and since they are the same note different octave, you don't have to worry about the distorion causing overtone "clutter". This wasn't even on an "instructional" video, just on the scenes from a memory dvd.

    The point is that whether they are teaching you or not, you can learn from them. Watch what they do, how they group notes, do they use octave displacement? If you want to learn you will. Just don't expect to learn everything at once. That is what practice is for, and its worked for centuries
    I personally learn alot from watching videos, or watching other players. I ususally watch things like how they hold their hands, how they play in positions, all kinds of things. I even watch piano players because there is always something to learn.

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