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Thread: Scale Positions on guitar

  1. #31
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    Scale Postions

    Quote Originally Posted by hellogoodbye View Post
    It isn't as complicated as you think. In fact. it's quite easy, really!

    In order to play in major in ANY key you only have to learn one big pattern (which can be divided into 5 easy to handle parts). By shifting this big pattern up and down the fretboard you will play in different keys.

    Let's say you let the big pattern start at fret 5 and you would be playing in A (depends on how you picture the pattern of course...): well, if you move the complete pattern up 2 frets (=2 semitones) you will be playing in B!

    So the patterns is the exact same (you only have to learn one) but the position on the fretboard determines the key!


    With this big major pattern you are also able to play all modes: the pattern is the same, only the root note changes.

    Example: minor. If you are playing in C you are playing all the notes that belong to Am too! So... the patterns is the same too, only the rootnote has changed: it was the C but it went 3 frets down to A.

    To play in C Dorian, just play the C major pattern but start at the second note! Etc. etc.

    Hope this makes any sense... Things always look very easy when you understand them...

    Anway, with learning just ONE (big) pattern you will be able to play (most) scales, keys, modes, whatever.

    If you want it I can send you a pdf I recently made with the 'big' pattern and some extra info on this all.

    Edit: forgot about your pentatonic scale: since the pentatonic is nothing but the major scale with two notes left out, the pentatonic scales are also in the same big pattern!

    hellogoodbye

    I realise that you posted this comment a fair while ago. But, if you still have the PDF it would be a great help if you could send it to me.

    regards

    Waldo48

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by hellogoodbye View Post
    I've attached the pdf to this post, so everyone who wants it can get it. Saves me a lot of time...

    Edit:
    You have the same icon as LarryJ... I already thought: I already send pdf to you! But he is not you and you are not him. You might consider changing your icon. Or is it the same on purpose...? Not that I have anything to do with it, of course...
    Mate Sweet effort on the .pdf file plain and simple it's a great road map.

    Just nit picking but in the blues scale it is referred to as a b5.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by waldo48 View Post
    hellogoodbye

    I realise that you posted this comment a fair while ago. But, if you still have the PDF it would be a great help if you could send it to me.

    regards

    Waldo48
    on post #23.

  4. #34
    UptempoMusicLessons
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigmentaljonny View Post
    Hey, since recently starting practicing scales daily during my practice, I have become confused with all the so called "positions" ie when u start the scale at a different point on the fretboard.

    Now I know all the positions of the pentatonic scale, and since there are 5 notes and 5 positions for the pentatonic, I figured after starting that this would be the same for the major scale. Well when I got a page of scales for G major it only had like 5, and the same with a page off the net. Reading further I picked up on the idea of modes, which is essentially just playing the scale starting from a different note, but then the modes often go past the root at the top of the scale, so surely when u descend it will sound different slightly because u started on a different note?

    Since scales on the guitar seem a lot more complicated than I ever remember them being on the clarinet, my old instrument I wonder if someone could shed some light on this problem, or point me in the direction of where I can find out, my goal is to resolve the problem then when learning scales to write out all the positions/modes in Powertab and learn a new set of positions each week.

    Thanks a lot,

    Jonny

    Hey Jonny, your best bet is to learn all 5 major scale fingerings first (there are 2 ways to play these, one is the "jazz way" with easy fingerings and little to no stretches, the other way is the "classical way" which involves 2 fret spans on many of the shapes.

    I will be posting information on exactly how to play your 5 major scale shapes both ways on my website in the coming weeks.

    As for your modal conundrum, get the major scales down first starting with the key of C then working outward on the circle of 5ths. Next key would be G, then F, then D, then Bb etc.

    You can think of modes as belonging to a major scale starting from a different note than the root. This is fine but the best way to get the sound of a mode is to play the chord that corresponds with the mode you want to hear.

    Here are the chords in the key of C:

    C Ionian scale - Cmaj7 chord
    D Dorian mode - Dm7
    E Phrygian mode - Em7
    F Lydian mode - Fmaj7
    G Mixolydian mode - G7
    A Aeolian mode - Am7
    B Locrian mode - Bm7(b5)

    So, what you do is, record each chord and let ring then play the scale over top and try to HEAR the mode. Do this enough and you will begin to recognize the sounds of each individual mode.

    Another thing to note. When you are playing over a tune, you cannot choose any mode. The mode is chosen for you by whatever the chordal instrument is playing. I have had several students in the past confused about his. "Hey, why can't I play Mixo over Crazy Train?" Well, Crazy Train uses chords that outline Ionian mode so you cannot hear Mixo over that progression.

    Hope that helped.

    www.vancouverguitarlessons.net

  5. #35
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UptempoMusic View Post
    ....... So, what you do is, record each chord and let ring then play the scale over top and try to HEAR the mode. Do this enough and you will begin to recognize the sounds of each individual mode.

    Another thing to note. When you are playing over a tune, you cannot choose any mode. The mode is chosen for you by whatever the chordal instrument is playing. I have had several students in the past confused about his. "Hey, why can't I play Mixo over Crazy Train?" Well, Crazy Train uses chords that outline Ionian mode so you cannot hear Mixo over that progression.

    Hope that helped.
    +1 Gotta have something droning to sustain the modal sound, I call it mood. Everyone learns how to make modes, then for some reason the how to use them drops between the chairs.

    Good luck.

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