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Thread: Four-Part Harmony Exercise

  1. #106
    MMus, MA, PGCE JumpingJack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarata View Post
    As usual, please give your oppinion about the solutions I've used.
    Generally fine, though you've doubled the third of the third chord which is not to be recommended. Also, between chords 3-4 in the tenor you've leapt a diminished fourth. This is forbidden.

  2. #107
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    Hi JJ

    Generally fine, though you've doubled the third of the third chord which is not to be recommended.
    I've done so to avoid consecutive octaves between bass and tenor (chords 2 and 3). In this case I'm assuming the tenor of chord 3 is a B (if the root was the doubled note) because in the movement from chord 3 to chord 4 one must keep the common tone (Alto = F#, in this case).

    Also, between chords 3-4 in the tenor you've leapt a diminished fourth. This is forbidden.
    This one came under the radar. The program checker I use didn't signaled and I didn't knew why. But I've found this in the help file.

    Objectionable melodic movements: Augmented and diminished melodic intervals (including the succession of two minor or major thirds, forming respectively a diminished or augmented fifth) should be avoided at first stage studies, trying to keep as much clear the music writing. Some diminished intervals are permitted (fifth, seventh, etc…) when they resolve by conjunct and contrary motion.

    I don't know but, probably this was not the rule in Bach's era. What do you think?

    Thanks
    Last edited by rbarata; 10-29-2014 at 10:27 PM.

  3. #108
    MMus, MA, PGCE JumpingJack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarata View Post
    I've done so to avoid consecutive octaves between bass and tenor (chords 2 and 3).
    Good thinking, but in that case maybe you could have re-voiced the second chord?

    Quote Originally Posted by rbarata View Post
    What do you think?
    Rules for melodic intervals as follows:

    - Leaping a seventh is forbidden
    - All augmented intervals are forbidden
    - Leaping a diminished fourth is forbidden
    - Leaping any other diminished interval needs to be followed by notes within the interval (ideally by step)
    - Leaps of sixths likewise need to be followed by notes within the interval
    - Leaps of octaves need to be followed AND preceded by notes within the interval

    As with all things there are exceptions, but I recommend sticking to the above guidelines.

  4. #109
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    Good thinking, but in that case maybe you could have re-voiced the second chord?
    Well, I think the voicing I did (chords 1 and 2) provides the smoothest voice leading, I think (see bellow):

    B B
    F# G
    D E
    B E

    The alternative would be:

    B B
    F# E
    D G
    B E

    Maybe I'm not seeing it correctly... That D-G is not so good as the D-E.

  5. #110
    MMus, MA, PGCE JumpingJack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarata View Post
    That D-G is not so good as the D-E.
    All other things being equal, you would be correct.
    However, if there has to be a compromise somewhere, then this would be an acceptable one. It would certainly allow you to be smoother with what follows (eliminating the ungainly diminished fourth).

  6. #111
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    ...if there has to be a compromise somewhere, then this would be an acceptable one.
    I see. Understood!

    One question... in the case of compromises such as this one, is there any melodic interval more acceptable than others? Just like chords, where we have primary and secondary (on which the primary are "more important").
    Last edited by rbarata; 10-30-2014 at 07:11 PM.

  7. #112
    MMus, MA, PGCE JumpingJack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarata View Post
    is there any melodic interval more acceptable than others?
    Well, you sometimes see leaps of sevenths, to avoid a part going out of range for example (but I'm not suggesting you do this by any means), but augmented intervals should be avoided at all costs (although there are exceptions even here such as on the approach to a chromatic appoggiatura, but you don't need to worry about this).

    In these kinds of exercises, there shouldn't be any need to disobey any of the the above rules. If you find you have done so, it's always best to go back and change it.

  8. #113
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    New exercise...this one has a problem, consecutive 5ths in the last two chords, between bass and tenor.

    9.1.9.jpg

    The given bass is too high and the soprano (also given) too low and this is causing lots of problems in the voice ranges. I tried to change the voicings from the start but I always get crossed voices.

    Any sugestions to eliminate the consecutive 5ths?

    Thank you

  9. #114
    MMus, MA, PGCE JumpingJack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarata View Post
    Any sugestions to eliminate the consecutive 5ths?
    Just switch the C# and E around in the penultimate chord.
    As this is an authentic cadence, you can happily have the leading note move somewhere other than the tonic - Bach did this all the time.

  10. #115
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    Hi, JJ. Thanks for the reply.

    One question...am I allowed to move the LT to any note (avoiding aug and dim, obviously)?

    I'm asking this because I got this info: The leading note at cadences (in the Alto or Tenor) will rise either a fourth (to the third of the next chord) or drop a third (to the fifth of the next chord).

    And, based on this, what if the LT is in the soprano or bass?

  11. #116
    MMus, MA, PGCE JumpingJack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarata View Post
    One question...am I allowed to move the LT to any note (avoiding aug and dim, obviously)?
    At authentic cadences, yes.

    Quote Originally Posted by rbarata View Post
    I'm asking this because I got this info: The leading note at cadences (in the Alto or Tenor) will rise either a fourth (to the third of the next chord) or drop a third (to the fifth of the next chord).
    Well, the only likely possibility not covered there is the leading note rising to the tonic (which is the "normal" way so no special rule is necessary).

    Quote Originally Posted by rbarata View Post
    And, based on this, what if the LT is in the soprano or bass?
    Then it should normally rise to the tonic.

  12. #117
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    Here's another exercise, in A major.
    This time, the only voice given is the soprano.
    I could only find a problem to be solved: too large interval between bass and alto, in chord 4.

    cgworksheet01.jpg

  13. #118
    Registered User JonR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarata View Post
    Here's another exercise, in A major.
    This time, the only voice given is the soprano.
    I could only find a problem to be solved: too large interval between bass and alto, in chord 4.

    cgworksheet01.jpg
    Looks to me like the issue with chord 4 is no 3rd! (3 roots and a 5th). Why not raise the tenor to C#?
    AFAIK, the interval between bass and alto (two octaves) is no problem.

  14. #119
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    Looks to me like the issue with chord 4 is no 3rd! (3 roots and a 5th). Why not raise the tenor to C#?
    Hello Jon. In fact, why not? And doing it, the interval problem is solved.

    I couldn't notice this one.

    Thanks.

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