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Thread: Extreme Music Notation Book Suggestion

  1. #1
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    Extreme Music Notation Book Suggestion

    I want to buy an music notation book.

    1) I play electric guitar but i want to write parts of other instruments. I want to learn mimics and characteristics and their notations of variety of instruments.

    2) I want to learn extreme mimic notation.

    For electric guitar example; sctraching strings with a pick up and down, raking with different frets, disordered timed bends, using expression pedal effects, creating tremolo effect noodling with the switch and that kind of crazy things.

    Which book or books do you suggest for those?

    I found it. Is it proper to my needs?

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/057...=ATVPDKIKX0DER

  2. #2
    Registered User JonR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zanshin777 View Post
    I want to buy an music notation book.

    1) I play electric guitar but i want to write parts of other instruments. I want to learn mimics and characteristics and their notations of variety of instruments.

    2) I want to learn extreme mimic notation.

    For electric guitar example; sctraching strings with a pick up and down, raking with different frets, disordered timed bends, using expression pedal effects, creating tremolo effect noodling with the switch and that kind of crazy things.

    Which book or books do you suggest for those?

    I found it. Is it proper to my needs?

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/057...=ATVPDKIKX0DER
    It does look like an excellent book, but (a) it's expensive, and (b) it may not contain ways of notating the effects you mention.

    On question #1, you really need a book on orchestration, not just notation. I have this one:
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Essential-Di.../dp/0739000217
    It's small and concise, but gives all the basic essentials (instruments ranges, transpositions, clefs, etc and important characteristics, such as difficulties at extremes of range).
    It doesn't go into the craft of orchestration or arranging - ie, why you might want the sound of a specific instrument in the first place (you can get bigger books on that).

    I also have the companion volume on notation:
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Essential-Di...d_bxgy_b_img_y
    Again, concise, with all the essential information. Not specific to instruments, but just details of various elements of notation that might apply to any instrument.

    What neither of them contain is any guide to those specific electric guitar effects you mention - and I don't know of any book that does. Those things are normally indicated through a mix of notation, tab, and words. Ie, staff notation will show pitches produced (if any) and timings, tab will show where to play them, and choice of effects would be in words.
    Eg, an on-off switching of a pickup might be indicated as repeated notes and rests, with some kind of phrase like "toggle pickup on-off".

    IOW, AFAIK there is no general dedicated system of notation for such effects. If there were, the problem would be players understanding the new symbols. It's a kind of chicken-and-egg thing, in that notational systems are no good unless widely understood; but new ones can't get widely understood unless they're used somehow. They just have to catch on slowly.
    I think there are tab signs for things like pick scrapes.
    Anything "disordered" or "random" could not of course be notated precisely. It would have to be some sort of descriptive phrase, with perhaps an indication on the notation for how long it lasted.

    There are various kind of 20th century notations, used for indicating those kind of improvised effects in avant garde classical music. But again, musicians need to be trained in how to read them.

    Eg, this is a page from a piece by Glenn Branca (Symphony no.6 for electric guitar):

    The source website describes it as featuring "totalist rhythms". I've no idea how to read that. Have you? (There's enough information - in notes, instructions and presumed timings - to work some of it out, but I wouldn't be able to play from it without some kind of demonstration.)
    The website shows examples of other alternative notations:
    http://www.artsjournal.com/mt4/mt-se...19&search=budd

    Or there's pretty graphic systems like this:
    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/7b14f656-2...#axzz2qC29kAiA
    Again, it kind of gives a vague idea of how the music might sound, but only vague. It certainly doesn't address the technical issues you're asking about (how those sounds might be achieved).

    But I'm guessing some kind of combination of all these approaches might do the job.

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