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Thread: Hearing problem...

  1. #1
    Born Guitarist
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    Jan 2013
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    Post Hearing problem...

    Hello guys,

    I'm a new guitarist and so far I only play chords. I am trying to hear chords but sometimes it is not possible for me. I was wondering if you could help me with that song:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3l-E4HfY2Q
    I think that the chords are: Dm C Am but it doesnt sound good... Can you help me?


    Thanks! And by the way, sorry for my bad English.

  2. #2
    Registered User Color of Music's Avatar
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    Jul 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by natoni View Post
    Hello guys,

    I'm a new guitarist and so far I only play chords. I am trying to hear chords but sometimes it is not possible for me. I was wondering if you could help me with that song:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3l-E4HfY2Q
    I think that the chords are: Dm C Am but it doesnt sound good... Can you help me?


    Thanks! And by the way, sorry for my bad English.
    Well, first of all, the reason it is difficult is because there are three guitars (at least) and they're playing each individual voice. (This is very common with monophonic instruments - although guitars are not. Instruments such as those of the wind/woodwind/brass sections of the traditional orchestra) Monophonic means that only one note at a time can be played. To get the polyphonic sound (many sounds: ie chords), you would need the required quantity of instruments.

    To play a C chord with the flute, one would need three of them each playing the appropriate voice. Flute 1: Root, Flute 2: Third, Flute 3 Fifth (Flute 4 if it's a seventh; Flute 5 if it's a ninth on up to seven instances if it's a thirteenth.) (It is much easier to see this on a polyphonic instrument - preferably of the chordophone (keyboard variety: ie: piano)

    You also need to grasp intervals as these are how chords are formed. Now, I've heard only the being, but I hear three triads right of the bat:

    Dm-Bb-A and then there are some what are called substitutes for those chords, but I won't bother you with those right now.

    Now, I'm also hearing an Am in the bridge. This chord is the V in Dm where the A while the V in Dm comes from the HM scale. So, the four main chords are Dm-Bb-Am-A. I could go into greater detail, but I won't.

    If you're having trouble hearing the chords pick out the individual notes and play them on a piano to hear what they sound like while grasping the concept of intervals.

    For any major chord (traids), you have the R-3-5 (ie: C-E-G) An interval is the distance between two notes and we count this distance in halfsteps or semitones. Therefore, from C to E (R-3), there are four halfsteps - C#-D-D#-E; (don't count the note you started on) The next intervl would be from E-G. Here, we have a minor third - or three semitones between notes: F-F#-G (again, don't count the note you started on)

    Minor, Augmented and Diminshed chords work in the same manner; therefore, if you just remember these numbers:

    43 = Major chord (C-E-G)
    34 = Minor chord (C-Eb-G)
    33 = Diminished chord (C-Eb-Gb)
    44 = Augmented chord (C-E-G#)

    Using this method also works with sevenths:

    433 = Dominant Seventh (C-E-G-Bb)
    434 = Major Seventh (C-E-G-B)
    343 = Minor Seventh (C-Eb-G-Bb
    344 = Minor-Major Seventh (C-Eb-G-B

    I remember telling Mom to write/learn music with/in/using numbers as this method makes learning it much, much easier. (Then again, if you aren't good at math ... j/k) This'll seem difficult at first, but practice until you're comfortable and can do it instinctively.

    So, back to that song: The first chord is minor (34), the second chord is Major (43) as is the third chord (43) until you get to the Am chord (34)

    I joked earlier, but if you're not good at math - this method won't work because math and music are closely related in more way than you may think. Learning intervals is only the second notch. Learning scales is the first part. And of course, there's rhythm, but rhythm is at the heart of music and you got to see the math connection here! I don't know how you can't!

    Anyway, I hope this somewhat helped. Again, I avoided going into too much detail because I felt I didn't need to hearing the song, but as you can see, listen out for the thirds, sevenths and/or both as these are your chord factors which determine the chord type. (There are more, but seems like you aren't there with extensions + alterations, yet; so I won't touch on that)

    I hope this helps and welcome to the forums. If you have any more questions, ask! We'll help you as best we can!


  3. #3
    Registered User
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    Mar 2015
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    And this 9/8 backing track in Bb (dorian mode) is a little more advanced, but really fun when you get the hang of it...














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