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Thread: Something I came across

  1. #1
    dwest2419
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    Smile Something I came across

    Hey whatsup you guys?

    As I started out playing my instrument today I notice something new that I never done before and that was starting on any note other than the note you want to land on. And once I grasp this new concept I started coming with many new licks and ideas. And I notice that there so many ideas out there ready to be explored. For example in the key of C, this new concept says to start on any note other than the note you want to land on. So if I wanted land on the note D I wouldnt start on the note D to begin a phrase. I could start with the one, two, three, the five, the sixth, or the seventh note and end the phrase to land on the two, get it? For instance say if I started with the sixth note now the challenge is to play a phrase where you start on the sixth note and land on two, this can done with ease. And now I have that mentality when I pickup the guitar. I know this may not be theory wise and a correct way to establish something, but I see no fault with this new concept. So that's my two cents.

  2. #2
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    I don't think this is a "New" concept. Why do you think there is anything new or different here.

    True, I'm really not sure what you are describing.

    But if you are trying to create your own licks using a scale, then you can start and finish on any notes you like. And you can also play any notes that you like in between the start and finish. You can play any of the scale notes, it's just a matter of what you think sounds good.

    Also, of course, you can play the passing notes in between the usual scale notes.

    There's absolutely nothing new there.

    Perhaps, without mentioning it, you are actually talking about the idea of hitting notes which match certain tones in the backing chords? Eg, when the backing chords change, you might get a better more professional sounding effect by hitting the scale note which is actually the root of the next chord (or you could hit any other note of the chord, eg the 3rd, 5th, 7th). Is that what you are talking about?

    If you really want to know about hitting the best chord tones when the chords change, ie what is called "voice leading", then yet again that is well explained in the same book I already told you about several times recently.

    But otherwise, I think you might do better to forget all these different little pieces of disjointed theory ideas, and just learn 2 or 3 of your favourite guitar songs from a songbook with full TAB (and notation).

    You can learn a lot and improve a lot if you really try to learn playing a few favourite songs all the way through, as close as you can to what the original record sounded like.

    If you just practice hard at perfecting that, then that's great practice for any of us.

    Later, after learning how to play the song, you can look more carefully at what notes you are playing and notice that they are probably coming from one or two well-known scale patterns. That should give you ideas of using those same scale notes to invent a tune of your own by playing something very similar to what you just learnt in the song, ie just play the licks of the song but change them a bit by repeating parts, adding other scale notes, removing some notes etc. You can quite easily create lots of your own songs like that.

  3. #3
    dwest2419
    Guest
    This is a good example of what Im talking about when I say you could play for example in a phrase you could play a C ionian mode and you dont have to start on the note C you could start on D E F G A or B but the thing is you have to land on the C note in order to make sound like C ionian.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tkVz...feature=relmfu

  4. #4
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    This reminds me of a few other ideas beginner musicians come up with:

    Paul Gilbert thought you were only allowed to use up strokes!

    A drummer friend of mine thought it was a cardinal sin to hit the snare and kick simultaneously.

    A guitarist friend thought major songs could have only major chords and minor songs could have only minor chords.

    Of course they saw the error of their ways later and can now see the funny side of their 'ideas'


    Quote Originally Posted by dwest2419 View Post
    This is a good example of what Im talking about when I say you could play for example in a phrase you could play a C ionian mode and you dont have to start on the note C you could start on D E F G A or B but the thing is you have to land on the C note in order to make sound like C ionian.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tkVz...feature=relmfu
    He is playing E phrygian, his backing track/pad sets the tonal centre as E.
    simply playing the C major scale over an E tonal centre will create a phrygian sound.

    He doesn't need to finish his licks with an E note to get that phrygian sound**, in fact ending all licks with the key note can sound predictable and boring.
    Ending on a note other than the key note can add drama and tension.


    Music needs tension, without it there can be no resolution



    ** (one could even argue ending licks on F will give the strongest phrygian flavour as the b2 is phrygians distinctive note, it's 'colour' note.)

  5. #5
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    [QUOTE=dwest2419;151169]This is a good example of what Im talking about when I say you could play for example in a phrase you could play a C ionian mode and you dont have to start on the note C you could start on D E F G A or B but the thing is you have to land on the C note in order to make sound like C ionian.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tkVz3GhxeI&feature=relmfu[/QUOTE]



    I didn't listen to the clip (I've heard lots of clips lol) - but if you think you must start and finish on certain scale notes then that is simply wrong.

    You can play any notes you like.

    Just experiment yourself with trying to create licks from a scale pattern (try, say, A minor pentatonic pattern-1 ... 90% of guitar players use that almost all the time!). Start your invented lick on any note you like ... then just make the lick as short or as long as you like using any of the other scale notes.

    As I said before - if you examine a lot of sheet music for a lot of guitar songs, you will find that licks often start and finish on notes that match certain notes in the backing chords. That often sounds good if you can do that. But it's not essential ... if you find it difficult to synchronise your licks with the chord changes like that, then just start and end your licks/solos/phrases/riffs, on any scale notes you like.

    There is a simple inexpensive book by a guy called Barrett Tagliarino ("Chord Tone Soloing") which explains this in detail.

    Actually, everything in that book is brilliant for anyone learning modern electric guitar stuff. You should do yourself a favour and shell out a few dollars for a copy. Use it for your everyday practice ...

    ... obviously you won't buy that book or any other books. And that's entirely your choice. But if you don't use books like that, then you have precisely ZERO chance of ever learning to play with the ideas they explain.

    Here’s the book http://www.amazon.com/Chord-Tone-Soloing-Guitarists-Improvising/dp/0634083651/ref=cm_cr_pr_pb_i

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