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Thread: Help with which notes these are!

  1. #1
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    Post Help with which notes these are!

    Hello,

    I have recently enrolled in a music theory class at my college and am having trouble identifying these notes on the homework given. Th bad part is, they do not provide a tutor. So I was curious if someone might be willing to help me out a bit by looking at the paper and helping identify which octave and note they are. There is only a handful. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I am trying to learn but with no tutor and horrible in-class examples it is making it hard. The more learning I do by getting help, I feel the further I will be able to progress.

    In the image, the G Clef and the Bass Clef are side by side instead of on top of each other, which makes it difficult for me to read.

    I filled out the top two, but I don't even know if I did that correctly. If I at least did that part correctly maybe I can figure out the rest.

    Thank you again so much for your time and any help or advice that could help me.

    Sincerely,
    David Mann


  2. #2
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    Don't worry about the treble clefs and bass clefs being side-by-side - for this exercise just consider each treble clef pair, then each bass clef pair, then repeat - they are not in a Grand Staff which I can see is causing you some confusion.


    Looking at the first line:

    - The first note is middle C which he has marked as c', so I assume he is using Helmholtz notation - see the attached chart (bottom lines), which should help:

    - The second note is a G in the same octave so g'

    - The third note (now in the bass clef) is f

    - The fourth note is Bb


    Moving on to the second line:

    - The first note is d'' (not an F note - this is treble clef!)

    - The second note is is a'' (again this is treble clef!)

    - The third note (bass clef) is Eb

    - The fourth note is Ab


    See if any of this makes sense in conjunction with the chart, and let us know what you come up with for the next few lines or if you have any questions.




    chart:
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by walternewton; 09-07-2012 at 02:43 AM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by walternewton View Post
    Don't worry about the treble clefs and bass clefs being side-by-side - for this exercise just consider each treble clef pair, then each bass clef pair, then repeat - they are not in a Grand Staff which I can see is causing you some confusion.


    Looking at the first line:

    - The first note is middle C which he has marked as c', so I assume he is using Helmholtz notation - see the attached chart (bottom lines), which should help:

    - The second note is a G in the same octave so g'

    - The third note (now in the bass clef) is f

    - The fourth note is Bb


    Moving on to the second line:

    - The first note is d'' (not an F note - this is treble clef!)

    - The second note is is a'' (again this is treble clef!)

    - The third note (bass clef) is Eb

    - The fourth note is Ab


    See if any of this makes sense in conjunction with the chart, and let us know what you come up with for the next few lines or if you have any questions.




    chart:
    Thank you so much for all the help and for taking the time to write out the examples for me, as well as attaching the chart. It helped out a lot. I was very confused because I did not know the middle C was in the same spot in each chart. Knowing this and moving forward was pretty simple. I think I have done the rest correctly now that you have helped me. I have listed each note above it so that it is easier to read. Any feedback would be great.

    Thank you again for all the help!


  4. #4
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    You're welcome - looking at it quickly, I think you've got the idea! - though your last 2 notes are incorrect (they are bass clef, not treble...) and the 3rd note of the 6th line is g.

    (I should say that I've never actually used this sort of notation myself, with uppercase and lowercase and hash (') marks indicating octaves - but since you were asked to provide note names and octaves, and middle C is designated as c', I *think* it's what you're being asked for - you might add the "contra/great/small/one-line/two-line/three-line" octave designations as defined in this link-)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmhol...representation

    Finally, if you haven't come across any already, there are any number of mnemonic devices to help you remember the notes of the staves - "Every Good Boy Does Fine" being the classic for the lines of the treble clef - learn these (or some others, or make up your own!)



    pic:
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by walternewton; 09-07-2012 at 05:34 AM.

  5. #5
    Registered User Color of Music's Avatar
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    To go along with the pic, if you come across when studying intervals - especially bigger than an octave apart, but at least an octave ...

    When one note is on a line, the octave above and below will be on a space.

    The blue G and red G in the bass clef; the blue E and red E in the treble clef.

    If the blue F in the bass clef is on a line, the F an octave above and below will be where? The red C in the bass clef. The octave above and below will be where?

    Same is true with the treble clef. If B is on the third line, where will the subsequent B's (an octave above and below) be? If the A is on a space, the subsequent As will be where?

    This is called "Octave Displacement."

  6. #6
    Registered User JonR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidMann View Post
    Hello,

    I have recently enrolled in a music theory class at my college and am having trouble identifying these notes on the homework given. Th bad part is, they do not provide a tutor.
    A college class without a tutor?? How does that work then? Who checks your answers?
    Surely they don't expect you to ask on the internet???

    Good advice here, btw - nothing I can add. (You seem to have it sorted.)

  7. #7

  8. #8
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    Thank you all again for the helpful replies it all helped and greatly improved my confidence in reading music. Thank you again!!

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