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Thread: Why doesn't the G major pentatonic scale box pattern include the notes C and F#?

  1. #31
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    James - can I ask a couple of very basic questions please?

    First - how long have you been playing guitar? Maybe you've had the guitar for a year and been practicing 1 hour a day, or what? How long and how much practice each day?

    Second - where are you learning things from, who is giving you the info. on how to play? You are now getting some good advice here (though I think you should definitely stick with pentatonic scales for now), but where else are you getting your knowledge about how to play and what to practice? ….

    … are you using some instructional books or instructional DVD‘s? Or are you trying to learn from free stuff you find on your computer? What are you using in order to teach yourself?

    Ian.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crossroads View Post
    James - can I ask a couple of very basic questions please?

    First - how long have you been playing guitar? Maybe you've had the guitar for a year and been practicing 1 hour a day, or what? How long and how much practice each day?

    Second - where are you learning things from, who is giving you the info. on how to play? You are now getting some good advice here (though I think you should definitely stick with pentatonic scales for now), but where else are you getting your knowledge about how to play and what to practice? ….

    … are you using some instructional books or instructional DVD‘s? Or are you trying to learn from free stuff you find on your computer? What are you using in order to teach yourself?

    Ian.
    I actually have been playing off and on for years now, but I always took a non-technical approach to learning the guitar. Over the years, I have gotten really good at playing chords and changing chords smoothly and with good rhythms. I have also gotten good at playing guitar and singing catchy vocal melodies at the same time. I spend a lot of time focusing on vocal melodies and playing rhythms on the guitar to match the melodies or vice versa(usually humming melodies while strumming through progressions). Now I really want to understand the guitar better and be able to play leads to my songs. People say I am a great rhythm guitarist and songwriter, but when it comes to play lead or anything really technical I am still a beginner basically. I am willing to put a lot more hours each day learning the technical side of the guitar, but I am still trying to figure out the best sources/methods for me to use in taking the first steps in getting into it. I really didn't want to at first, but I am thinking of just practicing leads of songs that I like that are in similar styles and tempos to my own songs? Just to get a sort of feel for how the notes are arranged? Then again, when I start to write my own solos...won't they wind up sounding like rip-offs of the solos I learned? I know most of soloing is creativity. What do you suggest I do for diving into all this?

  3. #33
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    I was reminded of an old post so I looked it up.
    Think about this. Take that pentatonic scale and make a melody from it.

    Melody lines and chord lines should share like notes. When they do those two lines harmonize and sound good together. The chord's pentatonic scale will have three chord tones for harmonization and two safe passing notes for interest. Lets say the chord you are playing over is the Cmaj7 chord. See how many different melodic phrases you can make using the C major pentatonic notes. Put your scale work to use.

    C major pentatonic scale = C, D, E, G, A.
    First melodic phrase in Mary had a little lamb (in the key of C) has these melody notes: E-D-C-D-E-E-E-D-D-D-E-G-G.

    Just notes from the C major pentatonic scale. My point - those 5 notes will let you compose many melodies. Instead of running scales make melodies.
    In another old post -- we heard about Louis Armstrong improvising his solo with improvised riffs and the band director took him aside and asked; "Boy, why are you using all that fancy stuff, just play the song's tune the melody." Of course I paraphrase.

    Grab some simple songs and analyze the melody notes used in that song. Once you understand why they work in simple songs, I bet the same rules will apply to the fancy songs.

    Good luck, it's a journey.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrJamesVagabond View Post
    I am thinking of just practicing leads of songs that I like that are in similar styles and tempos to my own songs? Just to get a sort of feel for how the notes are arranged?
    I don't think you can go wrong transcribing/playing/analyzing music you like - it is the classic way to learn to improvise.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrJamesVagabond View Post
    I actually have been playing off and on for years now, but I always took a non-technical approach to learning the guitar. Over the years, I have gotten really good at playing chords and changing chords smoothly and with good rhythms. I have also gotten good at playing guitar and singing catchy vocal melodies at the same time. I spend a lot of time focusing on vocal melodies and playing rhythms on the guitar to match the melodies or vice versa(usually humming melodies while strumming through progressions). Now I really want to understand the guitar better and be able to play leads to my songs. People say I am a great rhythm guitarist and songwriter, but when it comes to play lead or anything really technical I am still a beginner basically. I am willing to put a lot more hours each day learning the technical side of the guitar, but I am still trying to figure out the best sources/methods for me to use in taking the first steps in getting into it. I really didn't want to at first, but I am thinking of just practicing leads of songs that I like that are in similar styles and tempos to my own songs? Just to get a sort of feel for how the notes are arranged? Then again, when I start to write my own solos...won't they wind up sounding like rip-offs of the solos I learned?
    That depends how many you learn. The more you learn, the more you take what you like from each one, the more it becomes your individual vocabulary. No one else is going to steal exactly the same things you do!
    There's no such thing as total originality. The greatest improvisers - the most "original" composers - are simply those who've absorbed the most influences (translates as: "stolen the most stuff" ). You can ask any of them; they will talk about their own influences, and how they began by copying stuff.
    You can't help but be yourself in the end. You're playing music because something inside makes you want to do it; that's where your "originality" - your individual approach - comes from.
    Of course, you don't (usually) consciously play something you know you've heard before. But the things you've heard (especially those you've tried copying) all go into your subconscious, and come out in different combinations when you improvise.
    Language is a good metaphor. As a child, you learned a load of English words and phrases; you did that purely by listening and copying. (It didn't come from within you, and you didn't get it from books.) But pretty soon you didn't just parrot what the adults were saying; you worked out what you wanted to say, how to shape their words to convey your meaning. (Of course, you got more from books later; but you could speak pretty well before ever looking at a book.)
    Same with music.
    Quote Originally Posted by MrJamesVagabond View Post
    What do you suggest I do for diving into all this?
    OK, forget about learning scales. Even forget about copying other improvisers (for the moment).

    You say - "I spend a lot of time focusing on vocal melodies and playing rhythms on the guitar to match the melodies or vice versa(usually humming melodies while strumming through progressions)."

    You're talking there about writing songs - but improvising is the exact same process! (IOW, referring back to what I said above; this proves you've already absorbed a lot of music, because you can create. Everything you play has come from something you've heard before, whether you're aware of it now or not. You've just got to the stage where it's subconscious.)
    Just take one of your completed songs, play through the chords, and try singing a new melody, or adapt the melody you've already got. That's the beginning of improvisation. The only difference from composing is you don't need to worry about perfection: just try a load of different things and keep going.

    The next stage is to transfer what you're singing on to the guitar. You probably already do this to some extent, as you're trying to match your voice and guitar when writing. But focus on single-note lines. Take a chord, sing a phrase, then try and find that phrase on the guitar: note by note if necessary.
    Or try it vice versa: play a note on guitar and sing that note; play another one and sing that.

    If your ear is as good as you're suggesting - and you're good at coming up with catchy melodies - then that's half the battle. You only have to find a way to do it all on the guitar and not with your voice; and to do it on the fly while playing a song. (Don't worry about getting it perfect, like I say.)
    Last edited by JonR; 08-19-2011 at 02:03 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm View Post
    I was reminded of an old post so I looked it up.


    In another old post -- we heard about Louis Armstrong improvising his solo with improvised riffs and the band director took him aside and asked; "Boy, why are you using all that fancy stuff, just play the song's tune the melody." Of course I paraphrase.

    Grab some simple songs and analyze the melody notes used in that song. Once you understand why they work in simple songs, I bet the same rules will apply to the fancy songs.

    Good luck, it's a journey.
    Here is something I came across that kind of made sense to me:

    If, for example, I wanted to highlight that 3rd tone of the major scale in a sequence, I could create a run that ends on the 3rd. The starting note is not so important, as the quick succession of notes will blur the context.

    We're in the key of B major for this...


    The red text highlights how I've broken up the sequence. We start on the 3rd, followed by 3 notes, 2nd, 3 notes, 7th, 3 notes and ending on a lower 3rd. This is a typical run, where you have a "sequence within a sequence". Those highlighted tones can be seen as "marker points" that put the entire sequence into context.

    I know this is a run and not a phrase, but I looked at each individual note in this run and noticed a pattern that stays within the B major scale. For example: It starts off on the 3rd(D#), then quickly after with C# and B, then jumps to the next string and plays A#, C#, B, then A#, G#, B, A#, G#, F#(x2) and then finally E and D#. I can understand how playing 3 notes and if the 3rd note is B, that would harmonize the B chord and sounds good if the song is in the key of B, but I don't understand why towards the end the B notes are not being hit anymore(A#,G#,F#?). I know that as long as the notes are within the key of B, they will still sound good, but I am still trying to understand the theory behind this pattern. I am also unsure why the pattern doesn't end with a B note, but instead with a D# note...is that because the run started off on a D#? If the run ended on a note other than D#...would the run or phrase sound incomplete? If I can understand this I think it would make coming up with phrases and runs to play along with my songs easier because I am starting to see a pattern, although things are far from being clear.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrJamesVagabond View Post
    Here is something I came across that kind of made sense to me:

    If, for example, I wanted to highlight that 3rd tone of the major scale in a sequence, I could create a run that ends on the 3rd. The starting note is not so important, as the quick succession of notes will blur the context.

    We're in the key of B major for this...


    The red text highlights how I've broken up the sequence. We start on the 3rd, followed by 3 notes, 2nd, 3 notes, 7th, 3 notes and ending on a lower 3rd. This is a typical run, where you have a "sequence within a sequence". Those highlighted tones can be seen as "marker points" that put the entire sequence into context.

    I know this is a run and not a phrase, but I looked at each individual note in this run and noticed a pattern that stays within the B major scale. For example: It starts off on the 3rd(D#), then quickly after with C# and B, then jumps to the next string and plays A#, C#, B, then A#, G#, B, A#, G#, F#(x2) and then finally E and D#. I can understand how playing 3 notes and if the 3rd note is B, that would harmonize the B chord and sounds good if the song is in the key of B, but I don't understand why towards the end the B notes are not being hit anymore(A#,G#,F#?). I know that as long as the notes are within the key of B, they will still sound good, but I am still trying to understand the theory behind this pattern. I am also unsure why the pattern doesn't end with a B note, but instead with a D# note...is that because the run started off on a D#? If the run ended on a note other than D#...would the run or phrase sound incomplete? If I can understand this I think it would make coming up with phrases and runs to play along with my songs easier because I am starting to see a pattern, although things are far from being clear.
    The strong notes are all chord tones - except for the C# (2nd), but that makes a good chord extension (it's part of the pentatonic too).
    The other notes are just passing notes: not accented, not lasting too long, and falling between the stronger notes which are chord tones.
    This phrase works because the notes are all fairly short - I'm guessing they're intended to be 8ths or 16ths. It would probably also work if they were quarter notes, but any longer and you might feel that those in between notes needed to be harmonized with a different chord; IOW, they would stop being "passing" notes, and assume a stronger identity: how they sounded against the B chord might become more critical.

    The notes that fall on the beats (those highlighted in red) will naturally draw more attention, and you'd probably accent them a little more. So because they are chord tones, they sound like they fit. It basically sounds like you are spelling out the chord (the arpeggio), but linking them with other notes - just like a join-the-dots sketch, where you might add other dots between to smooth the lines out.

    The phrase ends on the 3rd, but it could end on any chord tone: they all sound good, but have different effects. Eg, ending on the root sounds more "final", especially if that note is also the keynote. Ending on the 3rd or 5th sounds more like some other phrase might follow. Ie, it's more like ending on a comma or semi-colon than a full-stop.
    Ending on the 7th would be even more "unfinished", and other scale notes (non-chord tones) sound increasingly less "final"; one or two might sound really odd (even "wrong") to end on.
    However, jazz musicians often think it sounds cool to end a song on the maj7 or 9 of the key. There's a sweetness to that lack of resolution.
    IOW, it's not wrong to not "put the period on the sentence" - it's just another creative effect, and you need to appreciate the differences.

    In this case, the chord being spelled out is a Bmaj7 or Bmaj9 - because the run includes accents on the 9th (C#) and maj7 (A#). The other notes are all B major scale, so that implies the key too. There are actually 2 other major scales that would fit the chord, and a couple of minor ones too. Those other scales would be chosen depending on the context of the B major chord (the key of the sequence it was being used in).

    Try playing the following chords, to hear the effect of a maj7 or maj9 (imagine this is the last chord of the song):

    Bmaj7
    -11-
    -11-
    -11-
    -9--
    ----
    ----

    Bmaj9
    ----
    -14-
    -15-
    -13-
    -12-
    ----

    Nothing wrong with those, right? Just a little more interesting (bittersweet?) than a boring old B major triad. If you like those sounds, then you'll want sometimes to end a solo phrase on the maj7 or 9 of the chord, to get that same effect (even if the chart doesn't say "maj7" or "maj9").

    You're thinking the right way about that run (you're analysing it well), but you really need to set up a B backing chord and play it, to see how it sounds. And then play it a little differently - maybe shifting the timing, so the accent pattern is different; maybe leaving one or two notes out; maybe ending on a different chord tone, or on a non-chord tone. Or play the exact same phrase over some other chord from the key of B, like E, F# or G#m.
    What does that sound like? (All the theory in the world is no use unless you know what this stuff sounds like.)

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    Ok well I messed with this solo to a simple B major backing and saw how it went along well. Now I am trying to add a few simple runs and phrases to a song a wrote that is in the key of B and in 4/4 timing. I know that which patterns to hit in which order to get a good sound depends on the vocal melody and the chord progression. The progression is really simple: B, C, A and this is the same for the verse and the chorus all the way through. The guitar strumming is in 16th notes because it is a fast rock style song. The B is strummed for 2 beats(8 strums), then the C is strummed for 1 beat(4 strums) and then the A is strummed for 1 beat as well and this is how the progression goes and the progression just loops from B to C to A and then back to B again and so on. With these chords and this timing in mind...do you have any ideas of which notes to accent? I don't mean to ask you to write a solo for me or anything haha. I just mean are there common phrase or arpeggio patterns that are commonly used when playing over this 3 chord progression in using 16th note strumming? Once I have a kind of basic idea I think even approaching a solo will become easier. The whole just play from your heart philosophy has only taken me as far as very mediocre solos that I would never take seriously.

    Thanks again,

    Robert

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrJamesVagabond View Post
    The progression is really simple: B, C, A and this is the same for the verse and the chorus all the way through.
    Robert
    How/why did you decide on a B, C, A progression?

    The B major scale is B, C#, D#, E, F#, G#, A#, and the chords in the key are........
    B, C#m, D#m, E, F#, G#m, A#dim.

    No really, I think we may have hit on something here. Looks like you need to back up and get your fundementals down before trying to write songs.

    Taking the following scale chart start with what notes are in each scale and then by stacking 3rds - using every other note - build the chords that key has.

    B, D#, F# = B major chord
    C#, E, G# = C#m chord, etc.

    Major Scale Chart
    C D E F G A B...............Notice the C scale has no Sharps
    G A B C D E F#.............and the G scale has one, the F#
    D E F# G A B C#...........and the D scale keeps the F# and
    A B C# D E F# G#.........adds the C#. Then the A scale keeps
    E F# G# A B C# D#.......everything and adds the G#. See how
    B C# D# E F# G# A#.....it builds on it's self.
    F# G# A# B C# D# E#
    C# D# E# F# G# A# B#
    F G A Bb C D E.............Look what happens with the flat scales
    Bb C D Eb F G A...........F has one the Bb, then the Bb scale keeps
    Eb F G Ab Bb C D.........it's self and adds the the Eb. Same thing
    Ab Bb C Db Eb F G.......the sharp scales did...
    Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C
    Gb Ab Bb Cb Db Eb F
    Cb Db Eb Fb Gb Ab Bb

    Memory pegs:
    See God Destroy All Earth By F#irey C#haos. Order of the scales with sharps.
    Fat cats go down alleys eating birds. Order of the sharps.
    Farmer brown eats apple dumplings greasily cooked. Order of the scales with flats.
    The key signature is showing three sharps. What scale has three sharps? C has none, G has one, D has two, A has three. Which sharps? Fat = F#, Cat = C# and Go = G# so the A major scale has three sharps, F#, C# and G#.

    Natural Minor Scale Chart
    A B C D E F G ................Notice how the 6th column of the
    E F# G A B C D................Major scale becomes the 1st column
    B C# D E F# G A..............in the minor scale and how the 7th
    F# G# A B C# D E............column of the Major scale is now the
    C# D# E F# G# A B..........2nd column in the minor scale. And
    G# A# B C# D# E F#........yep, the 1st column in the Major scale
    D# E# F# G# A# B C#......is now the 3rd column, etc. etc.
    A# B# C# D# E# F# G#....Ask your self why? Hint, think relative minor.
    D E F G A Bb C
    G A Bb C D Eb F
    C D Eb F G Ab Bb
    F G Ab Bb C Db Eb
    Bb C Db Eb F Gb Ab
    Eb F Gb Ab Bb Cb Db
    Ab Bb Cb Db Eb Fb Gb

    Answer the why you decided on B, C, A and then we will go from there.
    Last edited by Malcolm; 08-19-2011 at 06:43 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm View Post
    How/why did you decide on that progression?
    I know it seems like a strange and random progression. Basically every once in a while a really catchy melody pops into my head and if it is good enough I will find out which chords go along with it and just so happens that the melody goes perfectly with this progression.

  11. #41
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    OK it's your song. If you are happy I'm happy.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrJamesVagabond View Post
    Ok well I messed with this solo to a simple B major backing and saw how it went along well. Now I am trying to add a few simple runs and phrases to a song a wrote that is in the key of B and in 4/4 timing. I know that which patterns to hit in which order to get a good sound depends on the vocal melody and the chord progression. The progression is really simple: B, C, A and this is the same for the verse and the chorus all the way through. The guitar strumming is in 16th notes because it is a fast rock style song. The B is strummed for 2 beats(8 strums), then the C is strummed for 1 beat(4 strums) and then the A is strummed for 1 beat as well and this is how the progression goes and the progression just loops from B to C to A and then back to B again and so on. With these chords and this timing in mind...do you have any ideas of which notes to accent? I don't mean to ask you to write a solo for me or anything haha. I just mean are there common phrase or arpeggio patterns that are commonly used when playing over this 3 chord progression in using 16th note strumming? Once I have a kind of basic idea I think even approaching a solo will become easier. The whole just play from your heart philosophy has only taken me as far as very mediocre solos that I would never take seriously.

    Thanks again,

    Robert
    If those are all major chords, and not just power chords, they don't share a key scale. Also, the changes are too fast to worry about different scales for each chord.

    I would go with the strategy I suggested above: use the notes in each chord, with notes from the other chords as passing notes (if you have time for any passing notes!).

    Eg, on the B chord, start with the notes in that chord (B D# F#), and for any passing notes use the notes from the C chord (C G E) or the A chord (A C# E).
    But the changes are so quick I would probably be thinking only about chord tones, something very simple - because the changes are so unusual (chromatic), grabbing all the attention, a solo needn't be fancy.
    A good idea is to play a phrase that goes in the opposite direction to the root movement. Eg, if you start on the root of the B chord, don't go up to C on the C: go down to the G, perhaps via A. Then from the G, you could go up to A on the A chord, but again, don't go on up back to B, but come down to F# (5th of B); then you can go down to E on the C chord, and stay on E for the A chord.

    Here's that little phrase tabbed out:
    Code:
    CHORDS: B           C     A     B           C     A     B
            -----------------------|-----------------------|---
            12-------10-------10---|-----------------------|-------
            ------------12---------|11-------11-9-----9----|8---
            -----------------------|-----------------------|----
            -----------------------|-----------------------|----
            -----------------------|-----------------------|---
            1  .  2  .  3  .  4  .  1  .  2  .  3  .  4  .  1
    notes:  B        A  G     A     F#       F# E     E     D#
            R       b7  5     R     5        5  3     5     3
    Chord tones are shown underneath. There's only one passing note, the first A between B and G.
    I use A rather than A# or Ab, because A is (obviously!) in the A chord.
    Ie, I'm not going with any theory about the B major scale, jsut using the material in the chords themselves. As I said before, you need no theoretical knowledge for this: apart from knowing what notes are in your chords, I guess!
    Notice that I'm mixing up the chord tones, trying to use roots 3rds and 5ths, to make for variety.
    It would be possible to use a lot of other passing tones, in those gaps. As long as you hit a chord tone on the first beat of a chord, almost anything is fine as a passing note.
    But there's no need for any more notes than that. Quantity doesn't mean quality! IMO, it's only if you have a long groove on a single chord, that it becomes interesting to start piling on the notes and developiong really fancy phrases. The quicker the chords move - and especially if they don't share a key, as here - the simpler a solo can and should be.

    These ideas are about trying to suggest a logic in the chord sequence, to tie it together - because the chords don't share a key, IMO the solo needs to show how they can belong together, by highlighting shared notes - such as the two Es in the above phrase, on the C and A chords.
    You might also find that other notes will work on 2 or 3 of the chords, even tho they're not chord tones.
    Eg, I think A and B both sound OK on all 3 chords. A is the b7 of B and 6th of C. B is the maj7 of C and 9th of A. Some of these are slighty dissonant, but can easily be made to work.

    BTW, when you find a good phrase, repeat it! Eg, I would probably play the above phrase 2 or 3 times before looking for something else. At least I'd repeat those last 3 notes (E-E-D#) a few times, which I think sound pretty cool.
    Repetition adds another level of organisation to the music, which is good. And it also means you don't have to think too hard! Repeat a phrase and just change one or two notes in it, or change its rhythm. That way, it sounds to a listener as if you are intelligently developing your idea. If you keep coming up with new phrases all the time, it can just sound random and disorganised - unless every phrase happens to be brilliant! (But then if they are, they bear repeating anyway! Even a dull phrase is hugely improved by repeating it.)

    BTW, your "song" is really only a riff. What's the melody that goes with it? Could you tab it out? As I said before, make sure that whatever melody you are singing, you can play it on the guitar. That should give you ideas for how a solo might begin.
    Last edited by JonR; 08-19-2011 at 07:50 PM.

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrJamesVagabond View Post
    I actually have been playing off and on for years now, but I always took a non-technical approach to learning the guitar. Over the years, I have gotten really good at playing chords and changing chords smoothly and with good rhythms. I have also gotten good at playing guitar and singing catchy vocal melodies at the same time. I spend a lot of time focusing on vocal melodies and playing rhythms on the guitar to match the melodies or vice versa(usually humming melodies while strumming through progressions). Now I really want to understand the guitar better and be able to play leads to my songs. People say I am a great rhythm guitarist and songwriter, but when it comes to play lead or anything really technical I am still a beginner basically. I am willing to put a lot more hours each day learning the technical side of the guitar, but I am still trying to figure out the best sources/methods for me to use in taking the first steps in getting into it. I really didn't want to at first, but I am thinking of just practicing leads of songs that I like that are in similar styles and tempos to my own songs? Just to get a sort of feel for how the notes are arranged? Then again, when I start to write my own solos...won't they wind up sounding like rip-offs of the solos I learned? I know most of soloing is creativity. What do you suggest I do for diving into all this?
    OK, that's all fine but it didn't really answer my question about where you have been getting your practice material from and where you are getting information about what to learn?

    Do you have any instructional books that you practice from and learn from? .... what do you practice, where do you get your practice material from?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crossroads View Post
    OK, that's all fine but it didn't really answer my question about where you have been getting your practice material from and where you are getting information about what to learn?

    Do you have any instructional books that you practice from and learn from? .... what do you practice, where do you get your practice material from?
    Well when I first started learning the guitar, I had some instructional to teach me how to play a lot of different chords and then I would watch video tutorials on youtube and other sites that would teach me how to play songs I liked, but once I was able to play chords and progressions smoothly, I was able to put all my focus on making my own music(the reason why I wanted to learn guitar in the first place). Once I started to focus only on songwriting, I stopped learning songs written by others and I stopped focusing on technique, which has left me a very unbalanced guitar player. I am really good at playing chords, progressions, singing and playing at the same time and rhythm, but I am still a terrible lead guitarist and I still haven't fully memorized all the notes on the fretboard, although I can figure them all out with a moment to think(I want to know them by heart without having to think). Besides analyzing leads written in songs that I like to get a better understanding of how they work...do you recommend any other sources to look into or any other sources for better understanding the guitar in general?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrJamesVagabond View Post
    Well when I first started learning the guitar, I had some instructional to teach me how to play a lot of different chords and then I would watch video tutorials on youtube and other sites that would teach me how to play songs I liked ....
    etc. ....
    ...do you recommend any other sources to look into or any other sources for better understanding the guitar in general?
    Yes that’s the point - if you are relying on the internet for your guitar learning then I think you have absolutely no chance. Zero.

    Suppose you were hoping to be a professional mathematician. Would you really hope to do that from free advice on the net? Or suppose you wanted to be classical concert violinist, do you think the teachers at the Royal College of Music would tell students that they don’t need to study at the college any more, because they can just learn from what anonymous people say on the net?

    No. That’s never going to work. That’s not a serious approach to learning a musical instrument in any way at all.

    To cut the story short - if you are teaching yourself, then bite the bullet and pay for your own instructional books (or DVD’s in certain cases), and work through those by reading and practicing all the stuff every day. Practice it and study it hour after hour, until you can play it all and understand it all (I‘ve recommended what I think are the best books and DVD‘s many times here before).

    There’s just no substitute for that, and no other short cut will ever work.

     

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