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Thread: Rhyming Dictionary for Singers (based on vowel sounds)?

  1. #1
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    Rhyming Dictionary for Singers (based on vowel sounds)?

    I'm looking for a rhyming dictionary especially for singers. Basically, most rhyming dictionaries rhyme both the VOWEL and the CONSONANT, and they only match rhymes based on both of these parameters.

    Us singers, we don't care about the consonants, only the vowels. However, I've yet to find a rhyming dictionary that matches vowels only.

    So for example, in the traditional rhyming dictionary if you look up "feel" you get "peel, seal, real..."

    Singers though, we require something that if you look up "feel" you get "me, see, plead, feed, ecstasy...." (basically, the 'ee' vowel).

    Anyone know of any?

  2. #2
    Registered User JonR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DukeOfBoom View Post
    I'm looking for a rhyming dictionary especially for singers. Basically, most rhyming dictionaries rhyme both the VOWEL and the CONSONANT, and they only match rhymes based on both of these parameters.

    Us singers, we don't care about the consonants, only the vowels. However, I've yet to find a rhyming dictionary that matches vowels only.

    So for example, in the traditional rhyming dictionary if you look up "feel" you get "peel, seal, real..."

    Singers though, we require something that if you look up "feel" you get "me, see, plead, feed, ecstasy...." (basically, the 'ee' vowel).

    Anyone know of any?
    That's not a distinction between singers and poets/songwriters (or whoever else you're thinking rhyming dictionaries are aimed at)! It's a distinction between exact rhymes and partial rhymes. Plenty of singers would care quite a lot about exact rhymes. And some songwriters (or even poets) might not.
    It's a good question, tho, because near rhymes are often fine in pop/rock songs. But how do you compile a rhyming dictionary that allows them? It would be huge.
    Eg, I just looked up "feel" in an online rhyming dictionary. Even words ending in an "eel" sound came to 299! Add all the other possible final consonants, and you'd spend all day reading the dictionary and forget the song you were supposed to be writing...

    Personally, I never use rhyming dictionaries, although I do often struggle for a rhyme - and I don't like partial ones personally. (Although I don't mind final consonants that are close, like "n" and "m", or "t" and "d".)
    I think if I was to use a rhyming dictionary, I'd then find myself struggling to incorporate the rhymes I found into the lyric.

    Anyway - just some thoughts, and sorry I can't offer practical help.

  3. #3
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    I would without a doubt suggest:

    "The Complete Rhyming Dictionary: Including The Poet's Craft Book"
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/044...ef=oss_product

    I would suggest Pat Pattison's "Writing better Lyrics" book, however as far as rhyming goes, you can get away with his more 'workbook' style book for a lot cheaper.
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/079...ef=oss_product

    That book will go through rhymes that aren't 'perfect rhymes' and gives you a ton of new possibilities that aren't cheesy/predicatable. I don't have the book in front of me now to show you what I mean, but it is certainly worth your $10.

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