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Thread: Starting Over

  1. #1
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    Starting Over

    Sorry if this is in the wrong spot or redundant. I feel a little overwhelmed.

    I used to play guitar, and knew a little theory and could read music, but I never really knew many scales or chords and had poor understanding of the notes on the guitar in general.

    Getting back into it, I still have the muscle memory to blues solo a bit, and absolutely nothing else.

    I'm thinking I need to brush up on some theory, but don't really know how beginner to go. I sort of am looking for some books or a book lay out a clear path for really learning how to find the chords and scales I need. I think that's what I am looking for. I'm confused. I'm looking at these, but don't know if they cover enough or if they are good or if they are what I want or if what I want is smart:

    http://www.amazon.com/Guitar-Fretboa..._img_1_russss0

    http://www.amazon.com/Only-Chord-Boo.../dp/0976434784

    If someone could offer me some guidance I would appreciate it.

  2. #2
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScottRox View Post
    Sorry if this is in the wrong spot or redundant. I feel a little overwhelmed.

    I used to play guitar, and knew a little theory and could read music, but I never really knew many scales or chords and had poor understanding of the notes on the guitar in general.

    Getting back into it, I still have the muscle memory to blues solo a bit, and absolutely nothing else.

    I'm thinking I need to brush up on some theory, but don't really know how beginner to go. I sort of am looking for some books or a book lay out a clear path for really learning how to find the chords and scales I need. I think that's what I am looking for. I'm confused. I'm looking at these, but don't know if they cover enough or if they are good or if they are what I want or if what I want is smart:

    http://www.amazon.com/Guitar-Fretboa..._img_1_russss0

    http://www.amazon.com/Only-Chord-Boo.../dp/0976434784

    If someone could offer me some guidance I would appreciate it.
    Any time a book cover says - All you ever need - I suspect not.

    As far as chord patterns and the notes in a scale http://www.looknohands.com/chordhous.../index_rb.html does all I need.

    But that does not help with how to use those chords or scales to make music. There are some great articles on this site check them out. http://www.ibreathemusic.com/browse/index.php?ltr=A

    Give some thought to an instructor for a month. Four or five lessons is probably all you need to get back into the swing. That will set you back $75 to $100, but, save you months of time.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by Malcolm; 03-26-2010 at 02:16 PM.

  3. #3
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    Hi Scott
    Of the two books you linked, I'd choose the Fretboard Workbook. It seems to have a pretty clear layout / plan. The other book makes some statements that specifically tell me to look elsewhere,...."500 of the most important chords"..??,...."all you'll ever need"...??

    I agree with Malcolm, lessons would be a good start and that teacher could probably do a better job recommending books to suit your needs. You may find the articles on this site to be helpful, as well.

    -best,
    Mike

  4. #4
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    The first book is pretty good for the purpose of learning the notes on the fretboard and finding basic chord and scale shapes using what essentially amounts to the "CAGED" system (though the book doesn't use that terminology) - lots of exercises filling in blank fretboard diagrams, etc. - it doesn't get into any practical application of music theory.

  5. #5
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    Get Guthrie Govan's Total Guitar 1. The second one isn't necessary, as it's all two-finger tapping patterns etcetc, but the first one is great for explaining all the basics of theory in a nice, humourous way that never gets tedious.

    And it's cheap too

  6. #6
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    Agree re Guthrie Govan book-1 - invaluable for clear scale patterns and arpeggio patterns. It also contains a discussion of basic theory (though not the clearest imho). I still use it often as reference for scale & arp diagrams. But it has no chord diagrams.

    For what ScottRox wants, I think the best bet is Barrett Tagliarino's book "Chord Tone Soloing" (cheap too, and inc. a good demo CD for all the stuff in the book).

    For more advanced players who already know all their scale patterns (inc. modes) and all their arpeggio patterns, plus a good knowledge of basic theory of keys & chords etc., then the Scott Henderson DVD is unbeatable for in-depth explanation of how to improvise with scales and arps ... use it in conjunction with Guthrie Govan's book if you don't already know all those scales, modes & arps (and use Tagliarino as well if you need a clearer theory explanation plus some chord diagrams etc.).

    Here are some links to each of those three -

    http://www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/0404214/details.html

    http://www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/042224/details.html

    http://www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/0436450/details.html

    Ian.

  7. #7
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    I bought the Scott Henderson DVD because of Crossroads' constant promotion of it. And I don't regret buying it at all. It's in my top 3 DVD list of "stuff you need to own". His guitar tone tends to be horrrribly 80s and synth-ish... but it's great nonetheless:P


    I have no comma button.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Jan View Post
    I bought the Scott Henderson DVD because of Crossroads' constant promotion of it. And I don't regret buying it at all. It's in my top 3 DVD list of "stuff you need to own". His guitar tone tends to be horrrribly 80s and synth-ish... but it's great nonetheless:P
    I have no comma button.
    Cheers . But just to be clear for general readers here - I have no connection to that Henderson DVD ... I just keep recommending it because there really is nothing comparable covering so much detailed ground on improvising...plus he's very good at explaining things, and you get a lot for your money (that DVD will last most players for years!)...close to the perfect instructional DVD for my money...but you need to work hard with it.

    Yep I know what you mean re. the dated 80's sound of that guitar synth. But just to explain for those who haven't heard that DVD - the DVD itself is relatively new, but it's re-cut form Hendersons original two video tapes which are now about 25 years old.

    Actually I really love his guitar sound through most of the DVD, it's just the few parts where he's using a heavier synth sound where the tones get a bit dated sounding ... but that's a tone/sound issue which I suppose is very subjective, and some guys may like that sound anyway. But there's nothing wrong with sound quality of the DVD recording itself, we're just talking about whether you like Hendersons guitar tone & use of synth.

    I know some people say they hate Paul Gilbert's tone, both on his instructional DVD's and his general playing ... it's usually a very harsh thin sound with lots of treble. I've got used to it from using his DVD's, but I can see how many guys would think it far too harsh and "scratchy/tinny" sounding.

    I think most guitarists obsess about their tone. But I guess we'd all have slightly different ideas about what makes good or bad tone. And I expect we also go through phases where we think one particular tone is great, but a few months/years later we've changed our ideas and think a different tone is best (and obviously that may depend on what sort of music you're playing ... blues, jazz, metal, etc.)

    Just chatting about all that stuff .

    Ian.

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