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Thread: chord tones

  1. #1
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    chord tones

    does anyone have a pdf or a site that explains chord tones... in its most basic form? I've watch a few youtube videos on it but not much explanation is given. of if someone can explain to me how to solo using chord tones would be great also. Thanks

  2. #2
    JazzNerd gersdal's Avatar
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    If you know a little about chords you know that a major chord is built from 1-3-5, major 7th 1-3-5-7, minor 1-b3-5, minor 7th, 1-b3-5-b7, and dominant 7th 1-3-5-b7. In C that would be C-E-G for the major chord, C-E-G-B for major 7th, C-Eb-G for minor, C-Eb-G-Bb for minor 7th and C-E-G-Bb for dominant 7th. Chord-tone soloing is essentially soloing using the chord tones rahter than a scale.

    There's a good book on chord tone soloing on amazon. Recommended:
    http://www.amazon.com/Chord-Tone-Sol...6331044&sr=8-1

  3. #3
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    Second vote for the Barrett Tagliarino book (and it's cheap too! and it inc. a good demo CD ... absolute bargain) ...

    ... oh, and imho - free stuff off the net is almost always a path to getting precisely nowhere (honourable exception for Paul Gilbert's brief clips ... but even in his case, still waaay better to pay for his instructional DVD's).

    Ian.

  4. #4
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    A bass player will use chord tones - most of the time. What he is doing and what you could do for a solo is about the same. Bass lines are pretty much left up to the bass player, i.e. what he uses to gather / build the groove is left up to him. I think that would also apply to soloing. For example.
    Music is being played over the C chord here is what can be done:
    The root C repeated 4 times per measure or 8 to the bar - whatever- is always safe. Boring but safe.
    R-5 is safe except over diminished (b5) chords.
    R-3-5-3 fills out a 4/4 measure nicely.
    Invert all you like, i.e. 3-5-R-3
    Two chords per measure - R-5 on both is all the time you have. Say R-3 on the first then R-5 on the second.
    Now the bass will ignore a long fancy chord and use only the structure part - I never go beyond the 7ths, but, in a solo you would include the 9th, 11th, even the 13th in your solo.

    A google on Chord melody - where the chord and the chord tones are played in tandem may give you some ideas.

    Good luck.

  5. #5
    bitter old fool Jed's Avatar
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    Search for Guni's articles about triads, harmonizing the major scale, chord scales etc. Then make a commitment to really learn that stuff in a bunch of different keys.

    http://www.ibreathemusic.com/article/31
    http://www.ibreathemusic.com/article/56
    http://www.ibreathemusic.com/article/95
    http://www.ibreathemusic.com/article/105

    . . . the ball is in your court.
    Last edited by Jed; 02-16-2010 at 10:19 PM.

  6. #6
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    I think Barrett Tagliarino: Chord-Tone Soloing is good to go.Barrett Tagliarino analyses and presents a detailed guide to finding exactly those notes you are looking for.This is a good tutor book,it starts with basics and then goes into depth.

  7. #7
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    haha chord tones are found in the chord.. nuff said..

  8. #8
    SteveH
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    I did put a few pages online regarding minor, major arpeggios, and their 7th variants.

    It's a bit light on the theory, as I just wanted to focus on the layout of the notes on the neck.

    There's a good number of scale charts too, if you're interested.

    http://www.jambole.com/scales/

  9. #9
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    +1's for Barret and Guni's work.

  10. #10
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    Place your major scale pattern then play notes of the scale. Which ones, well chord tones make since.

    Chord tones are the 1-3-5 thus those are the resolve notes.
    Then 2, 4, 6 and 7 are the passing or tension notes.

    Now that is not complicated. OK what to do with that.

    Sound a 6 and take it to the 5. Ahha.
    Sound a 2 and take it to the 1. Ahha again.
    Make your phrase from the pentatonic notes, i.e. 1-2-3-5-6 you get three chord tones and two safe passing notes. Change the pentatonic to match the chord you are improvising over.

    http://www.amazon.com/Pentatonic-Kha...der_0757994474

    Common melodic movements:
    1) Start on 5 followed by a gradual movement to 1.
    2) Center the melody around the 3 then the inevitable decent to 1.
    3) If you start on 1 you are giving the punch line before the joke. Withhold 1 until later in the phrase.

    Check out... http://www.javierarau.com/lesson-Ana...dy1Article.pdf
    Last edited by Malcolm; 06-05-2010 at 04:05 PM.

  11. #11
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    Steve, what you have listed is much better for a beginner such as myself. I appreciate the work you have done. I have been trying to figure out the best ways to learn music and have been spending a lot of time checking reviews online. There are some pretty interesting reviews and i am getting a great sense of who to go to. Do you guys ever peek at www.angieslist.com?
    Last edited by MetroGnome; 06-27-2011 at 06:45 PM.

  12. #12
    Registered User Pieter-Jan's Avatar
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    I have read the articles by Gunharth Randolf on this website and I recommend them very very much! I keep a bundled version of all of them in my bookcase and pull them out frequently. I have spent many hours with them, and will spend many many more. They are the foundation to what I play today.

    Another very good lesson on chord note soloing can be found here:

    http://www.acousticguitar.com/lesson...oloing/1.shtml

    This has a more practical approach. It's actually 3 lessons, you'll find the others if you want to.

    Cheerz ...
    You can't have a theme and variations if you don't have a theme.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pieter-Jan View Post
    I have read the articles by Gunharth Randolf on this website and I recommend them very very much! ...
    do you have the link to where i can find this article?

  14. #14
    Registered User Pieter-Jan's Avatar
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    Sure,

    http://www.ibreathemusic.com/browse/...t=author&aid=1

    I recommend in this order:

    - Triads - the first chords (if you study this properly, you will get to know the position of the triads all over the neck - the base for a consistent solo)

    - 7th Chords

    - Improvisation Tools - Part 2: Arpeggios (this is a biatch to get through, a lot of work! ...)

    Good Luck!

    Oh, and two more things:

    When reading these articles, make sure to DO everything on your guitar. Don't just read it ... I used to learn music theory without a guitar in my hands, thus not playing everything I was reading, and have developed a huge gap between playing something and the theory behind it. This is something I regret and would like to fix as fast as possible.

    Don't try to be a perfectionist and learn all the arpeggio's (or triads or whatever you're learning) sequentially. What I mean by this is that you don't have to master the major arpeggio's before you can start working on the minor ones etc. It's the little differences between them (the position of the 3d in this case) that will make you remember them more rapidly and define their colors better when playing a solo. It's a good idea to emphasize the differences between chords when soloing over them. So knowing the function of every note is a real must!

    BTW: The search button on the main page is broken and a lot of the article overview pages too! This makes it really hard to find articles, even if you already know they exist! (hope someone fixes this ...)
    Last edited by Pieter-Jan; 06-22-2011 at 11:21 AM.
    You can't have a theme and variations if you don't have a theme.

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