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Thread: How long will it take to regain my ability?

  1. #1
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    How long will it take to regain my ability?

    Hey guys!

    I'm on a skiing trip in Colorado and I dont have my guitar! I'm extremly worreid that after a week when I get back I'll lose alot of my skill

    how long will it take to regain my skill?

    Sidenote I practiced about 5 hours a day every day and when I return I will play the same ammount as before!

    Help me!?!?

  2. #2
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    As soon as you get back go straight for your guitar, let's see you have been away for one week, IMO you will regain your skill level in 4 and 1/2 minutes.

  3. #3
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    I'd go one step further and say that the break from playing might do you some good and you'll play better when you get back.

  4. #4
    Registered User TheAristocrat's Avatar
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    I'm with Max, that's what happens to me. Once you reach a level you don't just lose that skill. After many years of not playing violin, I slipped back into the groove inside a few days.

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    you never lose the skill the brain part. and even the break away can stimulate creativity because you get out of your groove, and also physical ability as your body rests and recuperates.

    but too long away, and you will lose strength. it's like anything. if you want to compete in the olympics, you need to be in top physical shape, you can't just take months off and expect to be back where you were right away. you lose some muscle power. but the commands your brain sends to your muscles comes back real quick.

    so it depends on how much you are conditionned how much a few months will take off. if you're casual player you won't lose too much. i took a really long time off guitar, it took me a few months to get back where i was.

    one week, as stated above, will not hinder you, in fact, it will likely improve you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MusicMadMax View Post
    I'd go one step further and say that the break from playing might do you some good and you'll play better when you get back.
    Thanks guys!! I was worried a little but now I feel better

    and yeah! I've noticed that it can help! I was sick a day and I was unable to play, the next day when I went down I found I was playing so much better! Thanks guys! Also on a side note is there anything I can do to help when I don't have my guitar? I've been reading music but is there anything else?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikeman9412@gma View Post
    Thanks guys!! I was worried a little but now I feel better
    and yeah! I've noticed that it can help! I was sick a day and I was unable to play, the next day when I went down I found I was playing so much better! Thanks guys! Also on a side note is there anything I can do to help when I don't have my guitar? I've been reading music but is there anything else?
    One thing I do, is to play through scales and modes in my mind (ie without the guitar) - just sit quietly, relax (say in bed before going to sleep), and imagine the scale patterns on the fretboard ... in your head, go through all the interconnecting patterns.

    Eventually the aim is to go to any note anywhere on the fretboard, name the note to yourself, and then start playing any scale or any arp in any interval pattern from there. Ie, so that you are not merely starting a well known scale from it's root note, but instead starting your chosen scale from any note within the scale (or even from a note outside the scale, ie as a passing tone), and then playing any intervalic pattern within any of the interconnecting patterns anywhere on the neck.

    To make that more musical or meaningful, I do it for specific chord progressions. Eg, suppose I have a song which starts with the chords AbMaj7 - Gmin7 - Cmin7 - G7#5 - C#13sus, then maybe I'd want to imagine playing Ab-Lydian over the Ab-Maj chord, G-Nat.min over the Gmin7, C-Dorian over Cmin7, then Ab-Melodic minor over G7#(5), and B.Ma7arp over the C#13sus chord.

    Anyone who's got to the end of Scott Henderson'd DVD may notice where I got that approach from - at the end of the DVD he plays over quite a complex tune called Peru. If you watch him as he plays through the examples over each chord, then you see he usually begins playing off a note in the middle of his chosen scale (often a root note, but not always).

    So to play as fluently as he does, it seemed to me it's necessary to know all your scales and arps so well that you can instantly create a musical phrase from any note in the scale or arp anywhere on the neck (not just from a well known scale pattern in a specific position). The "musical" bit is down to you! (you probably need the guitar for that, to hear the sounds).

    Another thing you can try (again in your mind), which is not quite so demanding, is to play scales up and down one single string (say the top-E string to start with), in any intervalic pattern (ie again not necessarily starting from the root note). And then do the same thing but switching between two adjacent strings (eg playing the same scale, but moving between E and B strings). Etc.

    Again, anyone who's read the first few pages of Mick Goodrick's book will recognise that idea.

    In both cases, the idea (obviously) is to make you really fluent with numerous scales/modes and arps over appropriate chords. So that, as Henderson says "it's instant recall, like if you see the colour red, then instantly you say "boom, it's red!").

    Ian.

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    Thanks! I'll try those! That brings up another point though...

    I'm stuck starting on the root of a scale!

    I mean I can sometimes just start in other places but mostly I always start on the root!

    Any way to break this habbit? Or like learn to start in different places!

    Btw i've memorized all the scales so once I start playing them I can do just fine but it's that first note that always seems to be the root!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikeman9412@gma View Post
    Thanks! I'll try those! That brings up another point though...
    I'm stuck starting on the root of a scale!
    I mean I can sometimes just start in other places but mostly I always start on the root!
    Any way to break this habbit? Or like learn to start in different places!
    Btw i've memorized all the scales so once I start playing them I can do just fine but it's that first note that always seems to be the root!
    OK, you need to learn your intervals really well. Then you will instantly know where the next scale note/interval is in relation to the root.

    Eg, your first thought might be the root note, but then instantly you will know where the 5th is in relation to the root. In the same way, you will instantly know where the Maj-3rd or min-3rd is, or the 9th, or #4th etc. etc. So although you may first think of the root, you can instantly start playing from your prefered interval note.

    How do you learn intervals that well? Easy (well fairly easy lol , ) - buy Guthrie Govan's first book (Creative Guitar vol-1), where he has a unusually clear double-page spread of all the main arpeggio patterns, and play through those making a mental note of all the intervals (they are chord tones, so they are all specific intervals, eg root to min-3rd to b5th to b7th etc.).

    Ian.

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    Yeah for the most part I know the intervals like I know maj3 min3 maj5 etc...

    Like I don't have to play the root note but i just use it to get set up in the shape is that ok?

  11. #11
    bitter old fool Jed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikeman9412@gma View Post
    I'm stuck starting on the root of a scale! I mean I can sometimes just start in other places but mostly I always start on the root! Any way to break this habbit? Or like learn to start in different places!
    Sure. Just commit to never starting a scale from the root for one year. It's February, so start every scale from the 2nd, next month start every scale from the 3rd, etc, etc. In August just go back to the 2nd since you've missed half of February.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mikeman9412@gma View Post
    Btw i've memorized all the scales so once I start playing them I can do just fine but it's that first note that always seems to be the root!
    Have you memorized all the scales - or just a bunch of scale shapes? There's a huge distinction here. It takes years of effort to really get to know the just the major scales in all the keys and in all the positions. Few people that actually have memorized all of the major scales in all positions would ever say that they have them memorized.

    Here's a simple way to test yourself: Take any one triad and write out all the arpeggio fingerings you know. Submit that to the group and we'll tell you if you've found them all. Then ask yourself if you can play each possible arpeggio fingering in any key and actually name the notes in real-time as you play. Alternatively, can you play all of the 2-octave triad arpeggios for each diatonic chord in each position of each key - naming every note as you go. Can you "see" the notes on the fretboard or are you just reciting the chord spellings? Can you do the same for the pentatonic forms for each chord in each position in each key? Can you play your scales as melodic sequences - naming every note as you go?
    Last edited by Jed; 02-16-2010 at 09:09 PM.

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    Yeah I guess I don't know all of them, but the basic ones.

    I'll try to start on different notes like you said!

  13. #13
    bitter old fool Jed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikeman9412@gma View Post
    Yeah I guess I don't know all of them, but the basic ones.

    I'll try to start on different notes like you said!
    Mike,

    I'm not trying to rag on you but you would be well served to learn to do all those things for say the key of C major (at least). Doing so for all keys is best but possibly not realistic for most amateur guitarists (pro's have no excuse). Going through this process for at least the key of C major, will put a lot of questions, misunderstandings and confusion about theory behind you. Then you can use these new found perspectives to help guide your learning going forward.

    cheers,

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikeman9412@gma View Post
    Yeah for the most part I know the intervals like I know maj3 min3 maj5 etc...
    Like I don't have to play the root note but i just use it to get set up in the shape is that ok?
    Yep, that's fine. But of course it's also OK to start & end on the root note too, & obviously you might want to emphasise the root note in any lick/phrase anyway (ps, there is no Maj-5th ... it's either a perf-5th, or a #5 or b5 )

    But apart from that - I'm very firmly with Jed here re. "memorising" all the scales and modes. Frankly I'd say that even the best guitarists in the world rarely achieve that ... at least not in the sense of being able to move fluently between any of the notes in any of the patterns to make creative/improvised licks & phrases.

    That's why I emphasised what Scott Henderson was doing in his DVD - he knows the scales and arps so well he can just begin playing from almost any note anywhere, in whatever mode, scale or arp he decides to use over any passing chord ... that's how well we really need to know things ... though frankly I doubt if there are more than a handful of guitarists who can genuinely do that ... but it's a goal to aim at, a way to practice improvising over chord progressions with scales/modes and arps.

    But despite all that, at the end of that DVD, Henderson even say's about all those scales/modes/arps " If you've got all that stuff down already, then great, in fact I wish I had it down a little better myself " ... and that's from guy who can apparently play any note from any of those scales/arps/modes instantly, so that as he says " you see the colour red, and boom instantly you know it's red ... you hear the chord, and boom instantly there's your scale of choice " .

    Put it a simpler way - I'd expect anyone to take around 10 years practicing scales 4 hours a day, before they could say anything like " I've memorised all that stuff ".

    Alternatively, maybe we could all play a lot more off chord tones, without memorisng so many scale patterns. But that's also why I mentioned learning all those arpeggios & intervals ... those are the chord tones.

    Incidentaly - for anyone reading this who is not so totally committed ... don't let the the size of the above task phase you ... you can get a long way by just learning 5 pentatonic scale patterns (as long as you don't want to play jazz, or much else outside rock & blues) ... and you might even be a better musician if you get really good with pentatonic phrasing, rather than attempting to master the world with every scale, arp & obscure chord known to man.

    But hey, what do I know .

    Ian.

  15. #15
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    Yeah I really need to work on all those things you mentioned! Like visualizing the notes. Is it just practice? Or is there anything spacific that you should do to acheive the things you mentioned above?

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