Welcome!
Just a few a ground rules first...

Promotion, advertising and link building is not permitted.

If you are keen to learn, get to grips with something with the willing help of one of the net's original musician forums
or possess a genuine willingness to contribute knowledge - you've come to the right place!

Register >

- Close -
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: pay for studio work

  1. #1
    Registered User 12bar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    iowa city, ia
    Posts
    54

    pay for studio work

    i have recently started to do a lot of studio work but i have know idea about how much i should expect to be paid. i was wondering if anyone could tell me what is the average pay so i can tell if i'm getting screwed.

    thanks in advance
    "WIDDILY WIDDLY WHAAAA, yea I wrote that. It's called 'I Wanna Rock Your Body'." -Carl, aqua teen

  2. #2
    iBreatheMusic Modthor phantom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Following the changes
    Posts
    2,809
    Hey,
    that really depends on many things - i suggest this for useful read:
    http://www.ibreathemusic.com/article/171

    Basically you should have an "am i getting ripped off" attitude before you have played a single note - especially not as a beginner in that subject.

    good luck!

  3. #3
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    6,039
    Svens right, and I recommend to check out his article. it really depends on where you are, what kind of session, length of session, available budget.
    Problem is, if you set your prize too low, it might come over unprofessional, yet if you set it too high, they might call someone else before they even bargain, because they might consider that unprofessional too (the high prize).
    You could try to explain that you arent quite sure yet what is expected/possible, but then again, that might lead them to pay too low a prize... however, it would be a learning experience in any case.
    Eric

  4. #4
    iBreatheMusic Modthor phantom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Following the changes
    Posts
    2,809
    Right.

    Not easy.
    I may add, that it should be of your primary interesst to deliver phenomenal work with as least as possible holding up other processes the studio has to care about.
    Remember that it is not about you, but a project that has to be finished.
    Musicians are tools (in most of commercial productions).

    So, be a perfect tool and behave professional. It will be a loooot easier for you to get an even better price across if people know you deliver premium work and you are easy to handle.
    You will be paid to both sides satisfaction (depending on the project that might not be much, but there is no "ripping off"-action behind), since they know they can use you in other occasions and projects, and you might get a lot more next time when the budget is bigger as well.

    Work with them, be open and honest and ... convince!

  5. #5
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    6,039
    Quote Originally Posted by phantom
    So, be a perfect tool and behave professional.
    Of course, I agree! =)

    The behaviour-thing is just as important as the abilities and gear you bring to the production. It might take some time to do so, but eventually, you should try to figure out what the person you works for wants.
    Some producers expect you to be just that, the tool, to play exactly what they want, the way they want it, most likely having to be able to offer some variations based on his request. They might not appreciate if you make suggestions, while others might want you to do just that - I have worked with some people who were grateful for suggestions and small ideas.
    Some producers really KNOW the guitar and its capabilities and have a clear vision of what they want from you. Others might like the guitar, but might go by the "YOU are the guitarist, not me, so if you can think of something from that perspective, by all means, suggest it!" approach.
    I fortunately havent worked with many... well, "meanie-heads", but if you get hired by one of those, someone who just expects you to do your job and nothing more, and reacts kinda allergic to suggestions and ideas, then its a case of adjusting to it and just delivering what that person wants.
    Even if you work for someone who clearly has NO CLUE about the guitar... he pays the bills, and unless he expects you to play something which is completely unrealistic, your job is to play what he asks you to.

    Just like with every other branch of being a professional guitar player, professional behavior and good attitude are just as important as the skills for a session player.

    By the way, a nice reading recommendation: "Confessions Of A Guitar Player" by the late, great Tommy Tedesco. A fun read, with some insanely funny anecdotes from Tommys long and illustrious career as a session-player.
    I also watched his video a couple of years ago. Its REALLY hard to find that one today, but if you can, get it, its worth it. Very entertaining!
    Eric

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    485
    Maybe contact some kind of musicians union in your area or state. There are set award rates, at least in Australia. Here it is based on a 2-3 hour minimum which is around $150-200, depending on what they want you for exactly.

    Obviously your not always going to get this amount and you will have to negotiate. It is a good way to start the negotiations though.

  7. #7
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    6,039
    yeah, in the states, they have a scale system, single to triple, 250-750 bucks per session usually, but those are the rates from about 10-15 years ago, there are variations though, it really is a matter of looking at the situation, budget and everything, and then to figure out where to start negotiating.

Similar Threads

  1. Woodsheding...with bills to pay...
    By rythmicillusion in forum Mental Stuff
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-25-2006, 01:41 PM
  2. Hard work
    By Rizla in forum Guitar Technique
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 02-07-2005, 10:23 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-24-2005, 09:46 PM
  4. Robert Johnson's Rhythm Work
    By UKRuss in forum Composition, Arranging & Analysis
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 01-10-2005, 04:27 PM
  5. TIPS for doing STUDIO work
    By Sjonesmusic in forum Guitar Technique
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-22-2002, 09:17 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •