Welcome!
Just a few a ground rules first...

Promotion, advertising and link building is not permitted.

If you are keen to learn, get to grips with something with the willing help of one of the net's original musician forums
or possess a genuine willingness to contribute knowledge - you've come to the right place!

Register >

- Close -
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: complete newbie

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Uk
    Posts
    3

    complete newbie

    Hi guys and gals,
    i have been playing/trying to play now for around a month, i know this is not very long.
    i am learning chords and practicing everyday but i would like to start playing tunes i can recognise.

    i have found a type of riff on the internet. its b string and the intro to paint it black. i know its not the right way to play the tune but its recognisable.

    Basically i have 2 queations

    1) should i be cutting corners like this?
    2) anybody know any similar things

    the tune i know is 5 7 8 10 8 7 5 5 4 7 5 4. (b string)

  2. #2
    Artistically Bankrupt
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    869
    I highly recommend cutting corners and learning a few things you recognize and like. Plenty of time to learn to play later. I see too many starters quit because it becomes "work" too fast and not fun at all.

    Unless you're an academic, you should "work" only toward your current goal. That is, whatever you current skill level, you should only work when it is fun (as in trying to learn a few songs from Player X, etc.). I have been playing over 30 years, and am right now working on the simplest things that I pretty much skipped all these years. Never really needed them. Now I do. Thus, getting them is "fun," whereas if I didn't need them it'd be "work."

    Academics, of course, have a much tighter goal, and can't waste too much time mucking about with personal goals when they have established criteria to pursue. Note that one doesn't need to be enrolled in school to be an academic. Some players find much fun in pursuing theory and study. But they probably have borderline personality disorders. Well, okay, maybe not.
    "If a child learns which is jay and which is sparrow, he'll no longer see birds nor hear them sing."

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Uk
    Posts
    3
    it did encourage me, but i am just worried about learning bad habits and stuff.
    although i do use alternate picking on my one string!

    i still want to learn but use it as almost messing around as a break from learning chords and things.

    should i take lessons as soon as i can or can i work on my own for a bit?

  4. #4
    iBreatheMusic Modthor phantom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Following the changes
    Posts
    2,809
    I'd recommend taking lessons first and then maybe later go on with your own thing.
    As you mentioned, bad habbits are easily grown on you and it will be harder afterwards to get rid of them - even for a good teacher.

    So, try to get a good teacher and let him show you some standart basics and go for your own trial and error a little later.

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    67
    Hey gord_reid! Congrats on picking up the guitar!

    Okay, so first you talked about taking lessons with a teacher. I think that many pple around here will agree that when you start guitar, taking a few lessons with a teacher can help you make sure you don't mess your technique up. The problem with that is that not all teachers are good, and a bad teacher may not be able to correct your technique.

    Personally, I think that taking lessons when you start is not entirely necessary, if you are ready to make your own search and ask questions whenever there is something you are not sure about (IBM is good place to do just that ). That is mostly how I've learned over these last 3 years, and according to my current teacher (who I know is a really good teacher), I've got a pretty good technique.

    I think whether or not you decide to take lessons is up to you. Listen to your guts, if they tell you to get lessons, then do it. However, make sure you read Tom Hess' article on finding a guitar teacher. It should help you out.

    As for what to learn, I think Blutwulf got it right. Don't just focus learning scales and theory. Learn stuff that you want to learn. Don't start getting huber techinical right away, you'll bore yourself out.

    Lastly, here is a youtube video which could be of interest to you:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_ATg...ion%20Problems

    Good luck with everything.
    Last edited by irinamarella; 02-18-2008 at 08:07 PM.

  6. #6
    iBreatheMusic Modthor phantom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Following the changes
    Posts
    2,809
    Just want to add that even if you watch all the videos on the planet and read every single forum post on the net - nothing will replace someone who is able to tell you:
    "That sounds horrible - hold your hand like this, and your fingers like that and voila - much better".

    All that massive info on the net is nice to have and a good resource, but when it comes to the real stuff a one on one situation with a good teacher is priceless.

  7. #7
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Deep East Texas Piney Woods
    Posts
    3,145
    ......but i would like to start playing tunes i can recognise.
    OK IMHO this will have you playing recognizable tunes in no time. Now a G C D7 G chord progression will get you started and will work for hundreds of songs --- and pretty much sounds the same between one song and the next, i.e. is not going to be all that unique from one song to the next -- but that one progression will let you play hundreds of songs.

    The chords provide background harmony and rhythm, the melody notes provides the tune. And it's the tune that sets one song apart from another. So IMHO you have a choice to make if you want to play recognizable tunes; 1) learn tabs like you are doing now -- 5 7 8 10 8 7 5 5 4 7 5 4. (b string) or 2) find some other way of providing the melody.

    Well, your voice can handle the melody and your chords can provide the background harmony and rhythm. Using this method you will be playing and singing recognizable tunes in no time. All you need to know is how to read fake chord sheet music --- and sing while you play chords -- that will take a little time, to get the two working together, but, well worth the effort. And you do not have to have a great voice to pull this off - so don't let that stop you.

    Here are some fake chord sites:
    http://www.guitarnoise.com/easy.php
    And this site will go into detail how to read the sheet music.

    This site will have dirt simple three chord songs.
    http://www.roughstock.com/cowpie/songs/

    I agree with the other posts an instructor will get you there in half the time it will take you. But you can save a few dollars and get the basic under your fingertips and then go take lessons. There is enough stuff on the Internet to find out how to make a correct G chord or an F chord; so you pick up a few bad habits, if you take lessons in 6 months you will not have picked up THAT many bad habits and they will not be so ingrained that you can not change them.

    Go make some music and have fun, find out if you and the guitar are going to be long time friends. You'll know when it's time to go get some help from an instructor and have a better idea what you would like the instructor to help you with. Right now all you can tell him/her is; "I want to play the guitar". So you get the basic starter guitar course. I think you can do most of that yourself. Then let the instructor help you with improving your backup rhythm guitar and start you on providing an instrumental solo for the tunes you sing. You will understand enough that you can be very specific with your instructor.

    Good luck on your journey.
    Last edited by Malcolm; 02-18-2008 at 05:39 PM.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Uk
    Posts
    3
    cheers for your help people its basically what i wanted to hear, its still quite unnerving playing as i can get all strings to ring and things like that, but am i making hard work for myself?
    only time will tell. thanks for the links but the first one wont work and the second says it is being worked on but i will check again later.
    dont suppose anyone knows a good instructor in the north east of england?

  9. #9
    Bedroom metalurgist LaughingSkull's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Slovenia
    Posts
    928
    Quote Originally Posted by Blutwulf
    Unless you're an academic, you should "work" only toward your current goal. That is, whatever you current skill level, you should only work when it is fun (as in trying to learn a few songs from Player X, etc.).
    Listen to Blutwulf.

    Quote Originally Posted by Blutwulf
    Some players find much fun in pursuing theory and study. But they probably have borderline personality disorders.
    Don't listen to Blutwulf. Theory is fun!

  10. #10
    Registered User Jackpunk3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    24
    Yeah what i can add to what all the other said is that you have to have fun with it and patience

Similar Threads

  1. Another newbie
    By soulpumpkin1974 in forum New Members Zone
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-20-2005, 08:42 AM
  2. Newbie .. hello... and where can I post some mp3 files?
    By FretShock in forum Getting Started
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-03-2003, 09:47 PM
  3. First Time Newbie
    By bparham77 in forum Getting Started
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 12-03-2003, 05:17 AM
  4. a few questions from newbie....
    By gl2gz in forum Music Theory
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-02-2003, 12:48 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •