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Thread: Creating chords from the notes thats in your key

  1. #1
    dwest2419
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    Post Creating chords from the notes thats in your key

    Hey whatsup? List of chords that are acceptable in the key of A (can be used as substitutions.) Note: I think the thing I had found out is that you can get to use a certain specific amount of chords (that are safe), but they all have to have the same notes to the key your in (atleast I would say, thats just my opinion.)

    What I did was created the A Major scale, then I created the other six notes that comes along in the key of A including notes: B, C#, D, E, F#, and G#. Example: Take the D Major Scale for instance: D-(1)-E-(2)-F#-(3)-G-(4)-A-(5)-B-(6)-C#(7) (now I see only one note thatís not in the key of A, and that is G, thats in the key of D.) Say, if I wanted to create an D6add9 chord:1-3-5-9 all I would have to do is look at the number scale (thats in the key of D), and pick out the notes which is: D(1)-F#(3)-A(5)-E(9). But, first I had to make sure that this chord had to have the same notes that were in the key of A in order for me to use it, and sure enough, they did. You could say: "Hey, this chord is acceptable in the key of A because it has the same notes in the key of A, and this wouldnt throw me off, and could very well be acceptable.) But, when I started creating the major scale, for some of other the notes that were in the key of A, some I had to flattened (especially the B major scale), and some I had to sharpen, to see if I can use different chords that could be accepted in the key of A.

    I started doing this for all the notes that were in my key I was in. I started breaking down every note down that was in that key. I wanted to find out, for myself what else chords I can use beside the original min's, maj's, and the dim. I was able to find out that I have more chords I could use or have more options. But, sometimes you have to be careful because when you use alot of chords that has alot of notes in them, things can sound too cluttered (if you know what I mean!) Now you can look at the list of A Major Scale notes to determined if its possible. Can anyone even get this? Is this possible?


    A Major Scale: (1)-A-(2)-B-(3)-C#-(4)-D-(5)-E-(6)-F#-(7)-G#

    B Major Scale: (1)-B-(2)-C#-(3)-D#-(4)-E-(5)-F#-(6)-G#-(7)-A#

    C#/Db Major Scale: (1)-Db-(2)-Eb-(3)-F-(4)-Gb-(5)-Ab-(6)-Bb-(7)-C

    D Major Scale: (1)-D-(2)-E-(3)-F#-(4)-G-(5)-A-(6)-B-(7)-C#

    E Major Scale: (1)-E-(2)-F#-(3)-G#-(4)-A-(5)-B-(6)-C#-(7)-D#

    F#/Gb Major Scale: (1)-Gb-(2)-Ab-(3)-Bb-(4)-B-(5)-Db-(6)-Eb-(7)-F

    G#/Ab Major Scale: (1)-Ab-(2)-Bb-(3)-C-(4)-Db-(5)-Eb-(6)-F-(7)-G


    A major: A C# E Chord Formula:1-3-5
    Amajor7: A C# E G# Chord Formula:1-3-5-7
    Amaj9: A C# E G# B Chord Formula:1-3-5-7-9
    Amaj13: A C# E G# B F# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-7-9-13
    A6: A C# E F# Chord Formula:1-3-5-6
    Aadd9: A C# E B Chord Formula:1-3-5-9
    A6add9: A C# E F# B Chord Formula:1-3-5-6-9
    Asus4: A D E Chord Formula:1-4-5
    Asus2: A B E Chord Formula:1-2-5
    Asus2sus4: A B D E Chord Formula:1-2-4-5

    B minor: B D F# Chord Formula:1-b3-5
    Bmadd9: B D F# C# Chord Formula:1-b3-5-9
    Bm9:B D F# A C# Chord Formula:1-b3-5-b7-9
    Bm11:B D F# A C# E Chord Formula:1-b3-5-b7-9-11
    Bm13:B D F# A C# E G# Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-b7-9-11-13
    Bm6:B D F# G# Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-6
    Bm7:B D F# A Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-b7
    Bm6add9:B D F# G# C# Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-6-9

    C# minor: C# E G# Chord Formula: 1-b3-5
    C#m7:C# E G# B Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-b7

    D major: D F# A Chord Formula: 1-3-5
    Dmaj7: F# A C# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-7
    Dmaj9: D F# A C# E Chord Formula: 1-3-5-7-9
    Dmaj9#11: D F# A C# E G# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-7-9-#11
    D6: D F# A B Chord Formula: 1-3-5-6
    Dadd9: D F# A E Chord Formula: 1-3-5-9
    D6add9: F# A B E Chord Formula: 1-3-5-6-9
    Dmaj7b5: D F# G# C# Chord Formula: 1-3-b5-7
    Dmaj13: D F# A C# E B Chord Formula: 1-3-5-7-9-13
    Dmaj13#11: D F# A C# E G# B Chord Formula: 1-3-5-7-9-#11-13

    E major: E G# B Chord Formula: 1-3-5
    E6:E G# B C# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-6
    E7th: E G# B D Chord Formula:1-3-5-b7
    Eadd9: E G# B F# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-9
    E6add9: E G# B C# F# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-6-9
    E9th: E G# B D F# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-b7-9
    E11th: E G# B D F# A Chord Formula: 1-3-5-b7-9-11
    E13th: E G# B D F# C# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-b7-9-13
    E7sus4: E A B D Chord Formula: 1-4-5-b7
    Esus2: E F# B Chord Formula: 1-2-5
    Esus2sus4:E F# A B Chord Formula: 1-2-4-5

    F# minor: F# A C# Chord Formula: 1-b3-5
    F#m7: F# A C# E Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-b7
    F#m9: F# A C# E G# Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-b7-9
    F#m11: F# A C# E G# B Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-b7-9-11
    F#madd9: F# A C# G# Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-9

    G# dim: G# B D Chord Formula: 1-b3-b5
    G#m7b5: G# B D F# Chord Formula: 1-b3-b5-b7

    Here, I broke them down into groups:

    Amaj9: A C# E G# B Chord Formula:1-3-5-7-9
    Bm9:B D F# A C# Chord Formula:1-b3-5-b7-9
    Dmaj9: D F# A C# E Chord Formula: 1-3-5-7-9
    Dmaj9#11: D F# A C# E G# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-7-9-#11
    E9th: E G# B D F# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-b7-9
    F#m9: F# A C# E G# Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-b7-9

    Aadd9: A C# E B Chord Formula:1-3-5-9
    Bmadd9: B D F# C# Chord Formula:1-b3-5-9
    Dadd9: D F# A E Chord Formula: 1-3-5-9
    Eadd9: E G# B F# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-9
    F#madd9: F# A C# G# Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-9

    A6add9: A C# E F# B Chord Formula:1-3-5-6-9
    Bm6add9:B D F# G# C# Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-6-9
    D6add9: F# A B E Chord Formula: 1-3-5-6-9
    E6add9: E G# B C# F# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-6-9

    A6: A C# E F# Chord Formula:1-3-5-6
    Bm6:B D F# G# Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-6
    D6: D F# A B Chord Formula: 1-3-5-6
    E6:E G# B C# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-6

    Amaj13: A C# E G# B F# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-7-9-13
    Bm13:B D F# A C# E G# Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-b7-9-11-13
    Dmaj13: D F# A C# E B Chord Formula: 1-3-5-7-9-13
    Dmaj13#11: D F# A C# E G# B Chord Formula: 1-3-5-7-9-#11-13
    E13th: E G# B D F# C# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-b7-9-13
    F#m11: F# A C# E G# B Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-b7-9-11

    Amaj7: A C# E G# Chord Formula:1-3-5-7
    Bm7:B D F# A Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-b7
    C#m7:C# E G# B Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-b7
    Dmaj7: F# A C# Chord Formula: 1-3-5-7
    Dmaj7b5: D F# G# C# Chord Formula: 1-3-b5-7
    E7th: E G# B D Chord Formula:1-3-5-b7
    E7sus4: E A B D Chord Formula: 1-4-5-b7
    F#m7: F# A C# E Chord Formula: 1-b3-5-b7
    G#m7b5: G# B D F# Chord Formula: 1-b3-b5-b7

    A major: A C# E Chord Formula:1-3-5
    B minor: B D F# Chord Formula:1-b3-5
    C# minor: C# E G# Chord Formula: 1-b3-5
    D major: D F# A Chord Formula: 1-3-5
    E major: E G# B Chord Formula: 1-3-5
    F# minor: F# A C# Chord Formula: 1-b3-5
    G# dim: G# B D Chord Formula: 1-b3-b5

    Asus4: A D E Chord Formula:1-4-5
    Asus2: A B E Chord Formula:1-2-5
    Esus2: E F# B Chord Formula: 1-2-5
    E7sus4: E A B D Chord Formula: 1-4-5-b7
    Esus2sus4:E F# A B Chord Formula: 1-2-4-5
    Asus2sus4: A B D E Chord Formula:1-2-4-5

    Can this even be possible?
    Last edited by dwest2419; 10-16-2007 at 09:17 PM.

  2. #2
    bitter old fool Jed's Avatar
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    Well, it's a bit of the long way around but yeah, it looks right. All the extra work of learning this stuff the hard way may actually help you learn faster / better. Keep up the good work! Another way is to just stack diatonic thirds like so:

    Code:
    13    F#   G#   A    B    C#   D    E    F# 
    11    D    E    F#   G#   A    B    C#   D
     9    B    C#   D    E    F#   G#   A    B
     7    G#   A    B    C#   D    E    F#   G#
     5    E    F#   G#   A    B    C#   D    E
     3    C#   D    E    F#   G#   A    B    C#
     1    A    B    C#   D    E    F#   G#   A
    THe notes in grey are so-called "avoid notes"
    The bottom three rows give you the triad spellings
    The bottom four rows give you the 7th chord spellings
    The bottom five rows give you the 9th chord spellings (if diatonic)
    The bottom six rows give you the 11th chord spellings (if diatonic)
    All seven rows give you the 13th chord spellings (if diatonic)

    The highest consequtive chord tone (counting in 3rd's determines the chords base name. So if the highest consequtive note is the 7th, then it's some kind of 7th chord.

    For example:
    Amaj9 add13 = A C# E G# B F#
    Bmin13 = B D F# A C# E G#
    C#min7 add11 = C# E G# B F#
    Dmaj13 = D F# A C# E G B
    E9 add13 = E G# B D F# C#
    F#min11 = F# A C# E G# B
    G#min7 (b5) add11&13 = G# B D F# C# E

    cheers,

    PS Chords larger than 7th's are pretty rare. And by far the most important thing is to memorize the diatonic triads and later the 7th chords. The rest of this stuff will come naturaly / easily once the triads and 7th chords are memorized.
    Last edited by Jed; 10-12-2007 at 12:31 AM.

  3. #3
    Bedroom metalurgist LaughingSkull's Avatar
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    That is quite a long way to do it. I am doing things like Jed said. Stacking thirds. MUCH quicker, and it comes second nature. (Well i have them remember, without wanting them).
    But what you did have been a very good practice, from what you probably remembered a lot. So good work.
    And it's right, yes.
    By the way, you missed E13sus4 . Now start all over again.

    This is how I did it for C major scale:


    Cmaj Dm Em Fmaj Gmaj Am Bdim

    Cmaj7 Dm7 Em7 Fmaj7 G7 Am7 Bm7b5

    Cmaj9 Dm9 Em7b9 Fmaj9 G9 Am9 Bm7b9b5

    Cmaj11 Dm11 Em11b9 Fmaj9#11 G11 Am11 Bm11b9b5

    Cmaj13 Dm13 Em11b13b9 Fmaj13#11 G13 Am11b13 Bm11b13b9b5



    Note that some chords are not meant to be played (like Em7b9) ever ...

  4. #4
    dwest2419
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    Hey whatsup? Wow! Jed your way is much better! Thanks guys!

  5. #5
    bitter old fool Jed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jed
    For example:
    <snip>
    G#min7 (b5) add11&13 = G# B D F# C# E
    This chord should have been listed as:
    G#min7 (b5) add11 & b13 - G# B D F# C# E

    Please pardon the error . . .

    cheers,

    Jed

  6. #6
    Wordgirl: Jaded Musician jade_bodhi's Avatar
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    How do you use this information? I like Jed's chart but I don't know how to use it.
    Nobody ever shared
    what we have known...

  7. #7
    bitter old fool Jed's Avatar
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    The chart itself is just diatonic thirds stacked over a major scale. It's only value is as a way to see why various diatonic chords (or chord functions) have certain tensions that are available (because they are both diatonic and a whole step above a chord tone) vs other diatonic chords / chord functions that do not have certain tensions available (because although they are diatonic, they are not a whole step above a chord tone).

    The "diatonic and a whole step above a chord tone" requirement for available tensions / extensions is characteristic of functional harmony and it's application is limited to that kind of harmonic setting.

    In other words, it's a way to see why a IImin9 or a VImin9 is available in a functional harmonic setting but a IIImin9 is not (the 9th of the IIImin chord would not be diatonic). Similar extensions limitiation exist for all chord functions with each chord function having a unique set of available tensions vs avoid notes.

    I hope that makes sense, even to me it sounds like a complicated way to say something simple.

    cheers,

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