Welcome!
Just a few a ground rules first...

Promotion, advertising and link building is not permitted.

If you are keen to learn, get to grips with something with the willing help of one of the net's original musician forums
or possess a genuine willingness to contribute knowledge - you've come to the right place!

Register >

- Close -
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 29 of 29

Thread: Funky chords

  1. #16
    Mode Rator Zatz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Kiev, Ukraine
    Posts
    1,342
    Spino, we answered simultaneously
    Zadd9 -> A6 -> T#9b5 -> Zmaj7

  2. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    255
    Yeah Man! but what about the b7 ?

  3. #18
    Mode Rator Zatz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Kiev, Ukraine
    Posts
    1,342
    Quote Originally Posted by Spino
    Yeah Man! but what about the b7 ?
    Sure. I meant that. Not M7.
    Zadd9 -> A6 -> T#9b5 -> Zmaj7

  4. #19
    Did I say that out loud ? joeyd929's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    1,100

    Funk jam

    Here is a link to a little funk improv thing I threw together for laughs. It's just this drum beat with two chords and I enhansed the guitar with some effect just for fun. Check it out..

    http://www.onlinerock.com/musicians/...nkydrumjam.mp3

  5. #20
    Hacked Account widdly widdly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    a
    Posts
    381
    You dont even need chords for a lot of funk stuff. Just mute all the strings and follow the hi-hat pattern.

    Apart for 9th chords and the hendrix chord, dom13ths sound good and m7 sounds good too. Also changing the voicing you are using to create accents sounds cool too. For example you might be playing a E7#9 at the seventh fret then switch to a E13 at the twelve fret for some of the accented beats.

    You can get a lot of mileage out a simple two chord vamps. Something like Am-Bm or D7-E7.

    I know this is ibreathe but don't forget your wah pedal.
    ________
    Avandia Heart Attack
    Last edited by widdly widdly; 04-11-2011 at 07:29 AM.

  6. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,123
    I also like to use a lot of simple sus voicings, such as R, 2, 5 or R, 4, 5. Something you can grab real easy and concentrate on rhythm. Three note 4th voicings work well for this as well. May not be a lot of notes, but it allows you to create a lot of movement, which ends up being just as many notes.

  7. #22
    I like music.
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    316
    The funkiest chord progression lives in the nastiest of street hookers underwear. Its the tones their legs make when they walk.
    Hard luck and trouble...

  8. #23
    Resident Curmudgeon szulc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Jackson MS
    Posts
    2,223
    Take your favorite Dim7 Form and RAISE any tone 1/2 step.
    Since Dim7 = (rootless) Dom7b9
    You get (rootless) 9 because the note you raised is now the 9.
    Very cool for funk stuff especially with static dominant chords.
    "Listen to the Spaces Between the sounds."
    Hidden Content

  9. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    California
    Posts
    33
    I've had the pleasure of playing in 2 funk/R&B cover bands. Most of the tunes follow pretty much the guidelines people are saying here:

    For chord voicings I'm putting fret number from 6th thru 1st strings.

    1. 9th chord voicing, Example E9: x 7 6 7 7 7
    2. leave notes out, Example E9: x x 6 7 7 7
    3. slide around, Example: approach E9 from 1/2 step below, or from whole step above, or chromatically F#9 F9 E9 (like "play that funky music" by Wild Cherry).
    4. minor triads; actually for some songs the guitar plays major triads but the bassist is playing roots that cast those voicings as minor. At least that's the way Donna Summer's "Bad Girls" comes out when I play it
    5. smaller voicings (ie fewer notes) are generally better
    6. usually voiced top 4 strings of guitar, but if there isnt a keyboard you might voice them lower to make a fuller sound
    7. this dominant 7 seems popular: example D7 x x 10 12 11 12
    8. sus variation of above chord, ex: x x 10 12 11 13

    Above all get your rhythm tight. Here are some really great examples of funk guitar in no particular order:
    1. Kiss by Prince (doesn't come in till later in song)
    2. Love Rollercoaster by Ohio Players - intro kills
    3. Sex Machine by James Brown - less _is_ more
    4. Cut the Cake by Average White Band - busy guitar part w/ lots of chord fragments and slides
    5. Good Times by Chic - the muted parts are just as important as the chord

  10. #25
    Registered Crutmauler
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    256
    I think funk is more about rhythm than chords. Any chord can be funky.
    '

  11. #26
    a little freaked out cardello's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    athens, ga
    Posts
    167
    Quote Originally Posted by szulc
    Take your favorite Dim7 Form and RAISE any tone 1/2 step.
    Since Dim7 = (rootless) Dom7b9
    You get (rootless) 9 because the note you raised is now the 9.
    Very cool for funk stuff especially with static dominant chords.
    This is VEEEEERRRRY good advice.
    - Dave

  12. #27
    Resident Curmudgeon szulc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Jackson MS
    Posts
    2,223
    Thank you!
    "Listen to the Spaces Between the sounds."
    Hidden Content

  13. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    California
    Posts
    33
    Quote Originally Posted by szulc
    Take your favorite Dim7 Form and RAISE any tone 1/2 step.
    Since Dim7 = (rootless) Dom7b9
    You get (rootless) 9 because the note you raised is now the 9.
    Very cool for funk stuff especially with static dominant chords.
    That is cool. Same sort of thinking as Pat Martino. Unfortunately I wasn't bright enough to think like that on the fly.

    Know the dom7 grips, in all inversions. This helps also when it comes time to arpeggiate or solo over dom7 chords too. For any voicing raise the root up 2 frets (ie: a major 2nd).

    example
    A7: x x 5 6 5 5
    A9: x x 5 6 5 7

    same for minor chords:
    Amin7: x x 5 5 5 5
    Amin9: x x 5 5 5 7

    A good place to start trying this is w/ triads (there are only 3 inversions instead of 4). Plus you can experiment w/ subing 6 for 5 or 4 for 3. Once you know where each chord tone is in a grip it becomes easy to tweak voicings on the fly. I use the triad shapes in each chord as my crutch, and why not, its the core of the chord.

    For me the approach I described above (how to add extensions to a basic chord) is completely separate in my brain from chord substitutions (like iii-7 for IMaj7 or tritone substituion). When I play I do one or the other, not both---I can't think that much.

  14. #29
    excellent post, gentlemen. I'm a keyboardist, but the concepts are really relevant. you can never be too funky. In fact, I think I'll skip a shower tonight.

Similar Threads

  1. typical blues chords?
    By LarryJ in forum Getting Started
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 06-16-2010, 05:02 AM
  2. The Topic is...Chords
    By Bongo Boy in forum Getting Started
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 12-25-2007, 07:12 PM
  3. Different chords-->different modes ?
    By SE ´em all in forum Music Theory
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 10-28-2004, 04:07 PM
  4. Barre Chords
    By swebber-SG in forum Getting Started
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-21-2004, 10:51 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •