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wiechfreak
05-23-2005, 12:54 AM
Ive been writing songs, for sort of a one man folky thing and i wanna start playing open mic nights and gigs and such soon, but the problem is i cant play acoustic at all while standing! I have the guitar insanely uncooly high. Whenever i play a barre chord, some strings are dead notes, no matter how hard i try to press. I can play electric fine standing I dont know what I can do.

Any tips? http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/images/smilies/confused.gif

tucker97325
05-23-2005, 01:16 AM
but the problem is i cant play acoustic at all while standing! I have the guitar insanely uncooly high. Whenever i play a barre chord, some strings are dead notes, no matter how hard i try to press. I can play electric fine standing I dont know what I can do.

Any tips? http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/images/smilies/confused.gif

First, let me state my assumptions.

1: By acoustic, you mean a guitar with nylon strings rather than steel, which to me implies a classical guitar rather than acoustic. (If this is not true, then I have no idea what the problem is, since I don't find a huge difference between my flatbody electric, and my acoustics.)

2: You have no problem playing your classical guitar using the "proper" posture.

Assuming these assumptions :p are true, I would ask why you wish to stand? As far as I know, the sitting position, with your left foot raised approx 6" to 8" on a block, the guitar held in position on your left leg, against your chest, by your right forearem, as you lean gently forward is the correct posture for playing a classical guitar.

I've seen many artists, both folk and classical, performing from this position. If you're just worried about looking cool, remember there are a lot of great guitarists that play this way. Besides being correct, and I think cool, it's also a lot easier on your back when playing long sets. :D

Just my $.02

wiechfreak
05-23-2005, 01:54 AM
No I mean steel string acoustic.

with the thicker strings i cant even hold entre barre chords while standing, without strings being muted because i cant seem to press hard enough while standing. And as I said i already have it quite high so i dont know how to work on it

tucker97325
05-23-2005, 02:20 AM
Ok, I see. I thought you were talking about a different problem. (I have a problem standing with my classical, it just doesn't work for me with the extra wide neck and all.)

Now that I think about it, I think I did experience a similar problem when I played the electric a lot more than the acoustic. It could just be a matter of strengthening your fingers. They have devices to help with that, although I think just playing the acoustic more often helped me. You could try the old rubber stress ball, or those spingloaded finger exercisers.

On the other hand, it could be the action is set too high on the acoustic, or the string gauge is a little too heavy you.

There is also a tendancy, I have noticed, for electric guitar players to "roll" an acoustic guitar. That is to say the bottom of the guitar is moving away from the body, the top moves in (in extreme cases, it could look like the guitar is laying flat on the players lap). This rolling action moves the fret board away from your left hand by twisting the neck, making it difficult for you to reach the fretboard effectively. If you find you are doing this, try unrolling it. In fact, try under rolling it, and see if that makes a difference.

But, my bet is still on the finger strength/string gauge thing.

wiechfreak
05-23-2005, 02:26 AM
well im using .012 to .053, is that heavy compared to other acoustic strings?

wiechfreak
05-23-2005, 02:30 AM
hey man, u were right on with the rolling thing, I didnt even realize i was doing that! You rule!

Alright, but Im still wondering if the gauge strings im using is normal or not.

Poparad
05-23-2005, 03:03 AM
Your gauge is normal. I use .013 on mine, which is on the heavier end of things.

tucker97325
05-23-2005, 03:29 AM
I think the .012 to .053 isw consider by most manufacturers as a light gauge string. But, if you're still having problems you could try ultra light gauge. I think you lose too much with those, but they are easier to play. (Or go real crazy and slap some superslinkys on there. Just kidding.)

tucker97325
05-23-2005, 03:34 AM
So you unrolled and it mad a difference. Cool! Glad I could help.

So, between watching out for the roll thing, and strengthening your fingers either by exercising them or just playing the acoustic more than the electric, by jove I think you've got it!

tucker97325
05-23-2005, 03:53 AM
I just thought of one more thing you could try, to help with that role thing. Check out the guitar strap Willie Nelson uses. I don't know what they call them, but they come around the bottom of the guitar and hook into the sound hole, rather than being attached at the tail piece and neck. Seems like that type of strap might counter the tendency to roll the guitar.

Los Boleros
05-23-2005, 08:17 PM
Here is an excersise that will increase your finger strength on those bar chords.

Do this by holding a bar with your number 1 finger (Index finger) and using fingers 2,3 and 4 in their respective frets. Do it down the neck and back up as a warm up a few times before you play. The numbers below represent finger numbers and not fret numbers. Do this by barring anywhere on the fret board. Frets five through seven are very comfortable for begining but as you get better, work your way to the one fret.



E -------------------------------------------------1-2-3-4-----------
B----------------------------------------1-2-3-4-----------
G-------------------------------1-2-3-4-----------
D----------------------1-2-3-4-----------
A------------1-2-3-4-----------
E---1-2-3-4-----------
It looks alot like a cromatic excersise but its mainly designed to do two things:
1.Increase the strength of your bar.
2.Increase agility between your other fingers.