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theHeaters
08-25-2004, 05:49 PM
Hiya there, I was wondering if anyone could give me a hand regarding solfege. I'm having real trouble getting the pitches and syllables to stick. I mean i'm fine just going up and down the scale, but when it comes to the more useful stuff, figuring out melodies, I can sing the note, but haven't a clue about what the corresponding syllable is, unless I sing throught the scale from the root.
Do I just need to get aquainted better with the scale or wha? :)

Thanks Folks,
-Matt

Guni
08-25-2004, 11:12 PM
Practice and then practice some more...
- Use scales, up and down and in little sequences ...
- Sing different intervals, different chords...
- Focus on the bass line of a song that's being played on the radio and translate it into syllables ...
- sing songs that you know...

Get into the habit of using solfege whenever you hum or sing a song. It will take a bit of time to get into the swing of things.

J4mmy
08-26-2004, 07:31 PM
i feel so stuipid... whats solfage?

rmuscat
08-26-2004, 07:36 PM
:p !!!
http://www.ibreathemusic.com/article/44

:)

davidvanhalen
08-27-2004, 02:03 PM
hey guni i have a question for ya. is the method where you explained thatfor example in the cmayor scale whenever a sharp or flat came in it was called do sharp:di,
re sharp:ri,etc used in all countrys or just english language countrys?. i'm asking this because i'm from venezuela(we speak spanish) and all the books i have on solfege say that if there's a sharp or flat in a natural scale or a chromatic sacle it's pronounced just the same. for example: do sharp: do.
i'm real confused about this cause i really wanna learn solfege for ear training

Jamessesb
08-30-2004, 10:57 PM
hey guni i have a question for ya. is the method where you explained thatfor example in the cmayor scale whenever a sharp or flat came in it was called do sharp:di,
re sharp:ri,etc used in all countrys or just english language countrys?. i'm asking this because i'm from venezuela(we speak spanish) and all the books i have on solfege say that if there's a sharp or flat in a natural scale or a chromatic sacle it's pronounced just the same. for example: do sharp: do.
i'm real confused about this cause i really wanna learn solfege for ear training
hi Guni,
got the same problem here. i teach the choir to sing solfege & i encountered some "old" choir members who prefer to sing the same note syllables whenever there are accidentals attached to them. my other organist & i have the same opinion that there should be distinction between la(#)sharp & la(b)flat. another problem that i see is, if we are to sing the same note syllables irregardless of the accidentals, then how can you distinguish the differences between sol, sol(#), & sol(#-#)-double sharp??? is this opinion valid? if yes, how can i convince these choir members to sing different note syllable when it has accidental marking? btw, i gave your article 10, it was really helpful, but the "love me tender" solfege has a glitch, but it's great, thanks!!!!

Guni
08-31-2004, 12:12 AM
Sorry for the delay in my response!

First of all, there are a few different approaches when it comes to solfege, and it clearly reflects what musical background the person comes from. Classical musicians do have a different approach / usage of solfege. As far as I know there are many schools which teach the 'fixed DO system', ie C is always DO, whatever key you are in. I learned the 'movable DO system' ie DO always corresponds to the tonic. And protoganists of both systems can get into quite heated debate when it comes to one being better than the other :-)
Since I learned the 'movable DO system' from the start, I would not be able to sing even a tiny melody with the fixed DO system (except in C major :-)
The advantage of the 'movable DO' method is that someone has to analyse a tune / melody before picking a syllable. Without this, the system would be worthless. This clearly is a modern approach - yes, a jazz theory approach in it's flexibility and modularity....

I'd say it's tough to convince someone to sing a different syllable if
- he/she has been used to singing a different syllable for quite some time
- he/she isn't bothered about why, theorywise, a syllable is wrong.

ok, "wrong" is quite harsh word to use, but I hope you get my point.

About the syllables themselves: there are different variations depending on nationality, language, or even continent.
Continental Europe refers to the major 7th as si instead of ti... this can make things quite confusing. (si was replaced so that every syllable starts with a different letter)

But to be honest I have never heard of a system where 2 different notes get the same syllable. Not that it might not exist (I once heard that there is a solfege system out there that uses 3 FAs within one octave - yep, quite crazy ... ) but honestly I cannot see such a thing working for modern music, nor for worthwhile and fundamental eartraining. I am just imagining bII7 resolving to Imaj7 - singing twice DO ...??? mmmm


Finally, let me list what I believe to be a good summary of the most internationalized syllable system:



Interval, Syllable, Pronounciation (engl)
Unison, Do, dough
Augmented unison, Di, Dee
Minor second, Ra, Rah
Major second, Re, ray
Augmented second, Ri, like reach
Minor third, Me, May
Major third, Mi, like the word me
Perfect fourth, Fa, 'a' as in father
Augmented fourth, Fi, like feet
Diminished fifth, Se, say
Perfect fifth, So (or Sol), long 'o', like sold
Augmented fifth, Si, see
Minor sixth, Le, lay
Major sixth, La, 'a' as in large (like Fa, above)
Augmented sixth, Li, like lean
Minor seventh, Te, like take
Major seventh, Ti, tea