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View Full Version : Arpeggios (who needs em)



LuisSavesTheDay
04-21-2004, 02:38 AM
Okay. Arpeggios on guitar i jsut do not see a way of improvisation or anything. There sint enough room on the fretboard. With piano its a different story... But with gutiar i jsut cant use em. This is verysrupid of me to say, but i need someone to tell me waht is so good about them. Im very open-minded and will probably understand afteryou explain. Help my ignorance of arpeggios!

snufeldin
04-21-2004, 03:17 AM
When you're playing music with complex key changes it's sometimes easier to think about the chords changes instead of just the key changes. Also being able to locate the different notes of a chord all over the fretboard is helpful when developing your ear to fingers connection.

Plus they just give you another option when your soloing... which is always a good thing.

EricV
04-21-2004, 08:25 AM
Snufeldin made a really good point there... when you´re soloing, being able to think in both scales and arps, you just have more options. You don´t get stuck in a "scales rut", just playing scales up and down or get stuck with small intervals.
There IS enough room on the fretboard. Think about the range you have on the guitar. If you skip strings, you can get HUGE intervals. If you i.e. play a C on the low E-string, and then play the same fret on the high E-string, you´re skipping two octaves there. And it isn´t that much of an effort.
Playing an arp on the guitar usually doesn´t require wide stretches, because you have more than one string.
Eric

tom_hogan
04-21-2004, 10:42 AM
i play by ear cant be arsed with all this scale stuff

phantom
04-21-2004, 11:17 AM
i play by ear cant be arsed with all this scale stuff

well.. lucky you!!!

as we others are all born without having ears we have to relay on
mathematics and theory. we have to struggle through scales and arps and all the things we hate.

one day i hope i grow ears and i am finally able to hear what i play.

... until then i just practice...


:D sven :D

SkinnyDevil
04-21-2004, 01:04 PM
I have to use my hands to play - I tried my ears, but I can't stretch them around the neck (haha!).

Practicing arps or scales or licks or whatever just gives you options and a better understanding (intellectually AND intuitively) of the fretboard and the sounds. If it all seems mechanical, then grab up some study pieces so it's happening in a musical context - then it'll make more sense.

Bongo Boy
04-21-2004, 01:30 PM
i play by ear cant be arsed with all this scale stuffIt's very much like not having to understand the idea of sentences in order to write, I suppose.

phantom
04-21-2004, 01:34 PM
*lol* bongo....
and tom will give you a thumbs up on this one.....


"i'm vegetarian" said the blond one and swallowed the chicken nugget.... :rolleyes:

tom_hogan
04-21-2004, 01:56 PM
i play by ear cant be arsed with all this scale stuff

Sorry that was not a constructive post at all.

When I was a child I was extensively taught violin by Suzuki method (concentrates on the ear). This has helped me a unbelievable amount on my guitar playing, having a good ear helps with nearly all theory and i can understate how much it needs to be developed

i am far from a virtuoso its just I believe this is a quicker way to becoming sufficient at improv.

Just my opinion on what worked for me ;)

ps sorry if i sounded like a *******

phantom
04-21-2004, 02:22 PM
I believe this is a quicker way to becoming sufficient at improv.

hey tom, i absolutely agree with you. and i agree of course that having a good ear helps, in every way. improvising without feeling bound to a certain scale is great. especially if you have a good ear i'm convinced you'll get the most musical and personal result.

what i am wondering is, how do you save all the information you receive by ear?
i find it easier to handle if i know the name of the things that i play (chords, scales, intervals, relationships ....). also if you share stuff with other musicians it is better to know the common musical language.
also i find it easier to learn from others when they can explain me what they are doing..

p.s.: excuse me if i sounded like a ****** as well ;)

Alan(Lost)
04-21-2004, 02:44 PM
Arps are a good way of getting from A to B if a large gap is involved and you want to played notes up to B.

I don't ever imrpov with band stuff (apart from throwing the gtr around abusively a bit!). At home I do, for hours, just mess around playing along to everything, and I find myself using arpeggios to get me around the fretboard in between riffs and bits of scales.

RandyEllefson
04-22-2004, 12:46 AM
The best melodies revolve around chord changes, so if you're aware of the chords via arps while playing lead, it is easier to make effective melodic changes. I often drop down a "chord tone" or jump up to one, not for speed as sweeps are done, but to strike another solid note and then fill in the gaps (if the chord is A major, and I'm sitting on A at the moment, jump up to C# and walk down musically - or drop down to E and work my way back up to A).

chris
04-22-2004, 01:04 AM
The best melodies revolve around chord changes, so if you're aware of the chords via arps while playing lead, it is easier to make effective melodic changes. I often drop down a "chord tone" or jump up to one, not for speed as sweeps are done, but to strike another solid note and then fill in the gaps (if the chord is A major, and I'm sitting on A at the moment, jump up to C# and walk down musically - or drop down to E and work my way back up to A).

This is interesting! I smell a good IB lesson from this... maybe something on writing melodies? Even effective improvising using arp theory? I think Guni wrote in an article along time ago something about doing this but never did?

Bongo Boy
04-22-2004, 01:43 AM
ps sorry if i sounded like a *******No, that's too harsh. And I was only having some fun, and yes, please also excuse me if I too sounded like an *******. Man, iBreathe is just such a decent society, it's making me feel all goofy inside. :)

LuisSavesTheDay
04-22-2004, 02:19 AM
LOL bongo... Your great man...

RandyEllefson
04-22-2004, 02:59 AM
An article - that's a good idea. Just wrote a "note to self" to do it.

chris
04-22-2004, 11:23 PM
An article - that's a good idea. Just wrote a "note to self" to do it.

Yes Randy, I'll be looking forward to reading it as it was your comments that interested me. I really don't know exactly what your are saying but I got the point and it makes sense. That's why I'd like to see an in-depth article to really let it sink in. Hey, can you post a link to your articles else where? :cool:

RandyEllefson
04-23-2004, 01:18 AM
Sure. I post all articles on my site first, so it's the best place to check :)

http://www.randyellefson.com/Writing_Guitar_Licks.htm

http://www.randyellefson.com/Double_Tracking_1.htm

Part 2 of the latter is almost ready, but this new article idea is the best one in my "queue", so I'll do that right after! It IS an interesting subject and VERY useful. I would say that whatever melodic talent I always had finally come out all over the place largely to this.