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Jeansen
01-09-2004, 05:52 AM
hi guys, yesterday i 've gone to a store. it's amazing, i've found a lot of instructional videos available there but really, it turned me headache wheni must choose them! there's a lot of rare stuff also there such from blues saraceno, brian may, george lynch, bret grassed, shawn lane allan hplloworths and many more...

i really don't know what should i pick. can you help me? please, write down 10 most useful guitar instructional for you and if you would give the reason also. ( ex cause it's help me build the speed etc. ) thanx guys.

:)

DanF
01-09-2004, 12:51 PM
I've never actually bought any guitar videos (well except for Legends of Jazz but that's a performance DVD) but my friend let me borrow Joe Pass Solo Jazz Guitar although I had only been playing (if you could call it that) jazz for about 2 months so it was only good for blowing my mind.

I do plan to come back to it in a few months though now that I'm not so green :P That same tape had a bunch of Star Licks on it (some shred crap etc.) the only other one I liked was Larry Carleton's but his wasn't particularly useful to me either (again, could have been my lack of experience).

I'm kinda of interested in suggestions. I have noticed that the quality of Hot Licks videos seems to be pretty consistent and I'd say any of them is probably safe. What type of music do you like?

EDIT: Wait! I lied; I forgot I bought that Joe Stump Shred video from Berklee and it was horrible! Don't buy Chop Builder or whatever from Berklee, the only 2 good clips from it they put on the web for free at http://www.berkleeshares.com

-Dan

Oceano
01-09-2004, 01:23 PM
I always found books better for me. The only video I have is a Flamenco video by Juan Serrano.

However, I made the same mistake as DanF, and bought Chop buider by Joe Stump. It's a pieca of crap, and there is very little useful information there. The way it was advertised, was very misleading.

Anyway, I suggest you by a couple of videos of players that you like, or that play a style of music that you like.

JGuitar
01-09-2004, 02:07 PM
Hi there....

depending on your preferences, you could try John Petrucci's Rock Discipline, or Paul Gilbert's Intense Rock

Both really good videos with great info... but, you will have to develop a lot of speed to make a lot of the info contained in them usable. Lots of sequences and patterns that only sound good when performed fast.

To see these guys pull some of this stuff off is really incredible, so for "knock your socks off" value, these are top notch.

Cheers

Koala
01-09-2004, 03:25 PM
Yep, im not much into the videos but if i had tpo recommend one itd definitely be rock discipline with pertucci.

forgottenking2
01-09-2004, 03:41 PM
Rock discipline is very very good, it covers a lot of ground and you can use its concepts forever (I still use some of his approaches to practicing) the downside of that is that Petrucci's video can be extremely boring (specially if you're just starting out) Paul Gilbert's videos are a lot more fun (even though the concepts exposed there aren't as "eternal" Both videos are great and they both have helped me out, if you can, get them both and work on PG's first and then do JP.

I hope this helps.

Regards,

Oceano
01-09-2004, 03:53 PM
I never got into videos, mainly because here in Canada they are 2 or 3 times more expensive than the same book with a CD.

LarryJ
01-09-2004, 04:14 PM
I second the Rock Discipline video. It's probably the best out there, and theres a review of it on this site.

If you want to learn how to play, then the metal method series gets my bet. It covers pretty much everything possible, and its how I learned to play. Enjoyable to watch as well.

But for 'expanding' on what you learn, rock discipline gets my vote, as does "Speed Kills" by micheal angelo batio. You might not like his playing, but he's definitly got a good video/dvd out when it comes to speed picking. Petrucci covers a ton of stuff in his, and while its pricey (I think about 50) its worth it. I saw it once online for 35 though, so shop around.

NMucci
01-09-2004, 09:17 PM
Hello, here's a review of most of the videos I own

"Speed Kills" by Micheal Angelo, it really helped my picking. His "Star Licks" Video is cool too. I also have his "Jam with Angelo" video, song #3 is worth the price of the video, it's an acoustic number. Mikey's not a bad teacher either.

John Petrucci's "Rock Discipline" is cool, it's not terribly musical, but the excersises will help you alot. John's a pretty good teacher.

I have Paul Gilbert's "Intense Rock" and "Terrifying Guitar Trip" videos, bith are great. "Intense Rock alot of cool shredder ideas. "Terrifying Guitar Trip" is a bunch of stuff.
Paul, of course, is an awesome teacher.

Ok I'm gonna get made fun of for this, but I own Chris Impellitteri's REH video. It's actually not bad, some of the licks are cool except he plays them so fast that you have no idea what he just did. Oh well, Chris is actually a good teacher too.

George Lynch's REH video. It's actually better than I thought it would be. George gives away some cool licks. He's not a great teacher though.

Yngwie Malmsteen's REH video. Ok, has a bunch of cool Malmsteen licks, but Yngwie is a horrible teacher.

I have Terry Syrek's "Shred is not Dead" video. It's good, has alot of advanced soloing concepts in it. Get the book too. Terry's a good teacher.

Oh this isn't a video, but Guthrie Govan's "Creative Guitar 2" is an awesome book, go get it, NOW.

flathead
01-09-2004, 10:40 PM
I'm not big on videos but I absolutely love Rusty Cooley instructional CD's. I have all 3 and they are all great.

Anubis
01-10-2004, 03:29 AM
and that it's not really fair for him to be called a "guitar hero" or "guitar god" when a real god like Shawn Lane was unbeknownst to a large population of the guitar playing world.
I wonder why Lynch was more famous then Shawn Lane?
I think I have the answer but I won't tell you.
Lynch is one hell of a player.
The best ever in the whole universe if you ask me.

DanF
01-10-2004, 04:10 AM
I know Anubis! It's because in some way George WAS better than Shawn Lane and that's why he's more well known!

Take Justin Timberlake and Joe Satriani. Justin is obviously a FAR superior musician because he has millions and millions of fans where Joe probably has a million even (if that).

erm.

-Dan

PS Before anyone says it I actually do think Justin Timberlake is a hell of a singer (see: The acapella Beegees tribute they did at last years Grammies).

EricV
01-10-2004, 04:37 AM
I am gonna be the stick in the mud again and will throw in my 2 cents. :)

OK, I have seen a BUNCH of vids... some of them I watched and actually sat down and did the exercises on there ( Intense Rock I and II helped me tremendously back then... maybe even inspired me more than they taught me stuff )
I still like to watch a few of those vids for inspiration and...well, fun ( sure, it´s not as much fun as watching a concert video or a good movie, but hey, it can be quite inspiring to watch the Greg Howe-vid )

Now, the point is, a lot of the vids I didn´t consider that helpful. I mean, sure, if you have the money to buy a bunch of them, go ahead... you´ll sure be able to pick a lot of great licks, ideas and inspiration from them.
But then again, I sometimes doubt the actual "instructional value" of those vids.
I hate to mention names, cuz it´s not fair. I don´t mean to be disrespectful in any way, hope that´s clear. But take the Richie Kotzen-vid.
Yes, there are some cool licks on there, but then again... I have that video, and I take it out occasionally and watch... the intro-solo and the outro-solo.
Because those are amazing technique-wise, and watching them makes me wanna play. But then again, a lot of them were more like promo-videos. The Kotzen-vid is like "OK, here´s some mindboggling riff, here it is slow, I am playing a D on the low E-string..." etc
No chords are given, the licks are given away without any harmonic or rhythmic context. And showing them that slowly, note by note, well, that doesn´t really explain th idea behind the lick, or how to practise it. The notes can be seen in the TAB book anyway.
Well, I don´t blame Kotzen. I have heard that many of those were done "on the fly", very quickly, without much time to prepare anything. greg Howe once mentioned that, so did Vinnie Moore.
I am sure that some people consider those vids great. If you´re an intermediate or advanced player, or if you´re really interested and motivated, you can sure get something out of the vid.
But the things that I often miss are:
- No metronome or anything going on. Some of the subdivisions used really are tough or hardly possible to be used in the context of a song
- No harmonic background. Sure, you could just go "K, this lick is in Eminor, so I´m gonna play it over an E5". But there are so many cool things you can do by applying some "harmonically simple" riffs over some unusual chords. And some people just don´t have an idea yet how to figure out what chord to play over a certain lick
- Often, there´s no advice at all on how to practise that stuff. How the player himself developed and everything

That´s what I appreciated most about vids like the Petrucci-vid and Intense Rock, that´s what makes them stanbd out for me.
Petrucci actually shows how to use a metronome, and uses the metronome quite a bit throughout the video.
He focusses on how to develop good technique.,
Paul´s vid is a bit mor...flashy, you might say. But the PG-lick, the idea of working on very small segments like that and using them as "building blocks", in combination with him playing this stuff very accurately with a very dry (! ) or even clean ( !!!) sound is something I really appreciate.
But anyway, just my opinion... take it for what it´s worth
Eric

EricV
01-10-2004, 05:18 AM
Originally posted by Anubis
I wonder why Lynch was more famous then Shawn Lane?
I think I have the answer but I won't tell you.
Lynch is one hell of a player.
The best ever in the whole universe if you ask me.
Yu´re kidding, right ?
That has got to be a joke =)

Because... you´re not gonna say that he´s more famous because he is a better player ? Well, because if you go by that, then there are a bunch of players who are better than Lynch cuz he is not really one of the 10 most popular players ever ( and please, not another Hammett-pun... )
None of them was better. You can´t even compare them. Lynch played a different style of music than Lane, Lane was technically better, Lynch played in the context of vocal-songs ( rock, metal ) while Lane released instrumental stuff.
Noen of them is or was better. If you wanna speak technique... Lane sure was faster, has a better knowledge of theory, and plkayed over some pretty sophisticated music.
That doesn´t mean that Lynch is a worse player.. he has a very distionctive style himself, wrote some great riff, plays some great rock-solos.
But his popularity sure also is based on the fact that he was in Dokken. For a while, they were pretty big, more so in the States than in other countries. They had video-clips, airplay on MTV and the radio, toured the world.
Lane gained some popularity when he released "Powers oOf Ten" which was an instrumental album and pretty far away from AOR rock a la Dokken or Lynch Mob.
I am sure he was aware that he wouldn´t get a lot of airplay or play stadiums with that kinda music. But he did it anyway.
He never was in a hugely successful band ( Black Oak Arkansas wasn´t THAT successful ), never was feature in guitar mags a lot ( even though they´re GUITAR MAGS, they preferred to cover players that were selling records with their bands... after all, someone has to buy guitar mags too )
Anyway. Just my opinion. Yiou gacve yours, I gave mine. SSDD
:)
Eric

Anubis
01-10-2004, 08:59 AM
DanF wrote:

I know Anubis! It's because in some way George WAS better than Shawn Lane and that's why he's more well known!
In my opinion yes.
Shawn Lane was a decent guitar player but I never heard many lines he played that I cared to much about. But most of all. He didn't write any songs that moved people.
He is a bit like Holdsworth. A good guitar player but he writes music that people don't care to much about.
George Lynch did some great songs with Dokken and some great solos and he continued to do the same thing as a solo artist.




Take Justin Timberlake and Joe Satriani. Justin is obviously a FAR superior musician because he has millions and millions of fans where Joe probably has a million even (if that)
Yeah I think so. I rather listen to Justin Timberlake then Joe Satriani. Satriani gets boring after a few minutes but Justin has a better voice and also writes better songs. He is also a decent guitar player. From what I've heard Justin can shred on guitar. I think he might be a better guitar player then Joe Satriani.





EricV wrote:
Yu´re kidding, right ?
That has got to be a joke =) I never joke about guitar playing. I take this very very serious ;)




Well, because if you go by that, then there are a bunch of players who are better than Lynch cuz he is not really one of the 10 most popular players ever
Well I consider him to be one of the top 10 of the 80's and the 80's is the only decade that's ever been interesting to me.
What happened before or after is something I don't care to much about.
But as with everything else. This is all about taste and there is no right or wrong.

I just thought that what ajdowton was unfair and wrong.
Even though I don't like some players I can see why they are popular and I would like to hear other guitar players play over some of Dokkens song and try to come up with solos as cool and good as Lynch did.
Lynch has a certain kind of attitude and attack in his playing that I like and explains why he is as big as he is.
He also knew how to write songs that was of interest to more then guitar players which is something Shawn Lane couldn't do.



George Lynch is a Guitar God and a guitar hero.
The master of the universe on guitar to my ears.
I think that when Lynch dies and goes to heaven God will say "Hey Shawn Lane now Lynch is here. Can you move down a bit"



Now I will go and listen to some Justin Timberlake. Guitar playing is fun but bores me pretty quickly.
Justin rocks. Right Justin?

http://www.justintimberlake.com/images/teenppl.jpg

Anubis
01-10-2004, 10:17 AM
When MTV wanted dudes with long hair, spray painted guitars and hard rock songs, they deliveredWhat a bunch of crap !!
How old are you? 9? 12?
I was there in the 80's and MTV had NOTHING to do with Dokken. I cant even remember seeing them on MTV. MTV NEVER liked Metal. They had Headbangers ball for a while but that was a long time ago.
Do your homework before opening your mouth.
Not even Iron Maiden who was very very big in the 80's was played on MTV.
They sold out five nights in a row at Long Beach Arena but didn't get any videos played on MTV.





Shawn played for the music, never tailored his imageDon't you think George Lynch plays for the music!?!?








Have you listened to what's topping the charts now? At least here anyway, the top 40 is plagued by idol contestants, pretty boy bands, and women in men's clothing rock act's like Nickelback
Yes and I love it. What you and other narrow-minded guitar players who hangs out here doesn't understand is that music is more then guitar playing. Most guitar players can't write a song and that is why Nickelback is way much better and more fun to listen to then Shawn Lane.









Well, that's cool, but when was the last time that music moved you, changed your life or made you stop and thinkJustin and Christina moves me every day. I find it much more fun trying to imitate Aguileras voice on my guitar then copying Shawn Lanes boring licks. She has soul in her voice.








If talent = popularityMany guitar players likes to think like that because they can't live with the fact that most people on MTV is much more talented then most guitar players. Guitar players can do ONE thing. Play guitar. But they can't write songs, they can't sing and they can't dance or do anything else that people in general cares about.
So simply speaking. The talent factor is much more high on MTV then on this forum.
Sorry people but that's just how it is. We suck. Well at least I do.

And what's wrong with Japan?
Do you thing the world only consist of the Western Civilization?

And you are just spitting out a bunch of crap about Lynch which proves what I wrote.
You are a guitar players and guitar players in general sucks as musicians.
The only thing you seem to understand when we're talking about improving is guitar playing.
Everything else is like "What's that?" songwriting? huh? singing? huh?
Lynch has done some really brilliant albums the last few years. Wicked Underground for example.
You don't seem to know anything about George Lynch so don't open your mouth about him or anything else until you have done some homework.
Can anyone name ONE album that Shawn Lane did that more then 3 people actually cared about?









It really makes me sad to think that people could doubt Shawn's talentThe truth always hurts for some people. Shawn Lane was a decent guitar player but there are thousands of guitar players in Nashville who also is good on guitar but that's all they can do.
Talent to me is much more then just being able to play an instrument.










I've read and heard stories about guitarists often featured in top ten mags who heard Shawn play and fell off their chairYou've heard stories?
I didn't hear them I read them. Those few stories was all in the 80's and the only thing people was impressed with was the speed he had. The one who fell of his chair was Billy Gibbons but stories like that is usually not very true. Gibbons was probably drunk at some bar and fell off because of that.
I also consider Billy Gibbons to have WAY much more talent then Shawn Lane.









I have live footage of satch, scolnick, vai, gilbert and a whole load of shredders on stage on a jam of "goin' down", these guys are the real guitar gods, whose jaws drop! when it's time for Shawn to playNot true. None of those guys dropps any jaws when hearing Shawn Lane even though they think he was okay.









Every one has they're own favorite player/band etc. I just can't listen to people comparing Lynch to LaneNot me either. It's an offense again Lynch to be compared to a mediocre guitar player such as Shawn Lane.









There is no comparison. I could name a hundred guitar players better than LynchImpossible because there is none. he is the best ever.








You're baggin' Holdsworth too? He is a major-ly influential guitarist!Not true. Very few guitar players says he is an influence.








I read in a music mag recently that JT has been copying Michael Jackson pretty much exactlyNothing wrong with that. Everyone copies someone and copying the greatest pop artist in history isn't a bad thing.









NO ONE COULD TRY TO COPY SHAWN. SORRYI can't see any reason why someone would even like to do it.
I mean who is going to listen to it?

EricV
01-10-2004, 01:08 PM
Ok... let´s get back to topic.... it has gotten to the "personal opinion, not much sense in continuing this" point, so let´s get back to the video-part, otherwise this thread might be closed down...
Eric

Spin 2513
01-11-2004, 08:03 PM
I agree with those who said the first Paul Gillbert Video , and the First Vinnie Moore video. They both had some really good warm up exercises , which can get the picking happening.
I would recommend , a Stevie Ray Vaughn Concert Live Video ,too ,it's very inspiring.There is alot to be said of seeing how it 's done Live ,in Concert.That is the best commercially availible Video i can think of , he really had great Dynamics , "Tin Pan Ally" is incredible.
Unfortunatly Johnny Winter doesn't have any Non-Bootleg Footage that is really good , his playing is a bit easier to follow than Stevies' , in the Blues/rock style.
Johnny's Bass Player and Drummer,later became Vaughn's Band, Bass player ,John Paris, got his start with Johnny in the 70s , and toured with SRV in the 80s.
I 'm sure there's some inspiring Paul Gilbert Footage Avalible somewhere, he's good like that. Some players ,and Lables ,don't care if there marketed in Video, fortunately some do .

Any suggestions?

ash
01-13-2004, 01:58 AM
anubis wrote : I think that when Lynch dies and goes to heaven God will say "Hey Shawn Lane now Lynch is here. Can you move down a bit"

just like to say thats a pretty average comment. thats got nothing to do with recommending instructional videos.

eastwood
01-13-2004, 09:39 AM
ajdowton,

I just can't believe my ears man !

Lynch was / is one of the most influencial and respected guitarists of the 80's / 90's.

I can't see how you can justify calling him over-rated !

Everyone back then 'borrowed' licks from lynch, everyone wanted to have that 'sound' and attitude.

I haven't heard a player since that has such an original 'tone' coupled with a such a very impressive technique.

The guy can write songs too and also perform what he has written in front tens of thousands of people.

I can't remember when MTV were 'Dokken friendly' either infact the time I remember their tunes been aired was late at night...perhaps on the Headbangers Ball or something.

Can you play as well as Lynch ajdowton ?

Are you even better (Whatever that word means !)

If your not.....I don't think that your qualified to call him 'Over-rated'.

Bye Bye,

Daz

Spin 2513
01-15-2004, 12:38 AM
Did anyone like the Dio Strange Highways album?

Jeff Pilson , Dokkens , Bass Player , was on bass , a wrote on some of the songs , Tracy G on Guitar .

Oceano
01-15-2004, 01:06 PM
Heve you ever watched SRV "Live at the El Mocambo"?
Amazing concert video. Well shot, at a small club here in Toronto, I believe early 80's. Power Trio blues/rock at it's best. You are right, it's very inspiring. Everytime after I watch it, I don't play anything else but my Strat for the next two weeks.

Jeansen
01-19-2004, 08:50 AM
hi, i understand about ur words Eric..i've bought the joey taffola's video..it's horrible..too fast for me...yeah..i think i'll focus on john petrucci's and Gilbert and Gambale's stuff..but i think ritchie's is good..really inspiration for me..how about Bert grased ( sorry if i spell it wrong ), Eric? :)

flathead
01-31-2004, 06:29 PM
I'll also add Mike Campese's instructional cd rom to my list. Just picked it up yesterday. Learning alot of things from it. Stuff I wouldn't have thought of.

EricV
01-31-2004, 06:56 PM
Cool. Unfortunately, I haven´t seen that one yet. But I am sure it rocks. Why don´t you review it for the rest of us ? =)
Warm regards
Eric

KFCshred
01-31-2004, 08:11 PM
frank gambales "chops builder" is an awesome video. It gives you a well structured workout that covers just about everything you should work on to "build chops".

I just ordered Paul Gilberts intense rock, I hope its as good as everyone says.(I'm sure i is)
I'm also thinking of checking out John Petrucci's Rock Discipline.
.................................................. ...............................

I would not advise anyone to ever watch Tony MacAlpine's Starlicks video, it is in no way helpful unless you already know everything he tells you.

Spin 2513
02-02-2004, 02:53 AM
Someone said Joey Taffola had an Instructional Video, Being as Taffola and Gillbert recorded "Out of the Sun" together .I would think Taffola's Video would be much of the same A minor E Phrigian, kind of scale work .

How does Taffola's Video compare to Paul Gillbert s 1st Video?

EricV
02-02-2004, 01:55 PM
Tafolla´s vid was recorded around the time of "Infra Blue", his second solo-album. If you have heard that one, you know that it is very different from "Out Of The Sun"... it´s more bluesy, even has some Morse-style country-licks, not really a neoclassical album.
So, on his video, there aren´t really any neoclassical licks. The video deals with stuff like chromatics, combining chromatics and the pentatonic scale, open string-licks ( very cool stuff ). Also, you get to see a few live-performances of songs from "Infra Blue" at the MI.

I think the main difference to the PG-video is that Paul shows you a bunch of techniques and licks you can use, while Joey shows you runs and little etudes based on playing-concepts... and doesn´t go too much into the actual playing techniques required to play those.
So you COULD say that before trying to work through the "Shredding" video, you should work through the exercises on "Intense Rock" to develop your picking and legato technique.
Hope this helps
Eric

Spin 2513
02-04-2004, 08:20 AM
oh yeah thanks , Eric ,


It's sounds good , like a demonstration , more than a slow the lick down , video .
Blues Saraceno , had an instructional , which was okay , but it only had a couple of actual usable Riffs . I concentrated alot on getting different sounds and effects from the guitar , and equipment and using the Whammy bar , which before i saw the video , i didn't realize Saraceno even used a Whammy .
He talks about doing Volume swells with a delay , similar to Eddie Van Halens "Cathedral" . And he shows how to play one of his tunes , from the Hair pick album .

The best part of that one was the actual playing in the beginning, and end of the video , and the Song he plays to the backing track .

Paul Gillbert intense rock II actually got more into what"Blues Scales " scale Patterns to use , and Improvising with them , Fast and Slow , and how to write riffs to play on ZZ top Texas Boogie jams , and stuff .
That was a really good intermediate level Video .

Much different approach than the "shred videos"

like Yngwies "watch me shred video " which is good for a different reason .You get the Riff at two speeds
Fast , and faster .

If Taffolas is a shre video like that , but with , Jazzy blues type shredding , it would be a good thing , i'm sure

EricV
02-04-2004, 11:30 AM
Hey there...

Haven´t seen the Saraceno-vid, but I know what tune you´re talking about... "A Lighter Shade Of Plaid".


The best part of that one was the actual playing in the beginning, and end of the video
Sounds a lot like the Kotzen-video to me =)
I guess it depends on the viewer too... after all, someone said he got some good exercises out of the Kotzen-vid, while I mainly enjoyed the intro- and outro-solos and considered a "motivating video" instead of an "instructional video"


Paul Gillbert intense rock II actually got more into what"Blues Scales " scale Patterns to use , and Improvising with them

Yeah, I know. I´ve worn out two copies years ago...watched it pretty much every day. I loved that part about phrasing, analyzing the rhythm of melodies, and dynamics.
Great stuff, one of the best... wrote a review of it for ibreathe, too

Tafolla´s video is less "general", has more licks and runs instead of focus on specific techniques. He also explains how to play "Wrecking Ball", a wacky shred-solo from his album...
Eric

Relaxation
02-08-2004, 04:59 AM
HAve you seen Morse's power lines video? What's in it?

Bizarro
02-08-2004, 05:31 AM
like Yngwies "watch me shred video " which is good for a different reason .You get the Riff at two speeds

Isn't that the truth! That was so dang funny/depressing when I first saw it. He really is a fast mo-fo.

Spin 2513
02-14-2004, 03:05 AM
Yeah i here ya,

When Yngwie plays "Far Beyond the Sun" at the end of the Video , and starts soloing with his Teeth , it's great , you know he's having a blast , doing it .

After rereading this thread i see Eric V and A.J. Downtown , have seen most of the Vids out there . From looking on line i see most of the instructional Guitar Videos , are on the DVD "Young Guitar" Lable now . My guss is the REH and Hot Licks shred Videos with "Out of Context " Riff , with no backing track , or reference to a chord to play the Riff over are ,some of the "First Ever " Guitar Instructional Videos ,put on the market .

And speaking of the older videos I was wondering if anyone has seen the "Vinny Moore II"
Video , i understand it has some good sequencing exercises in it .

EricV
02-21-2004, 11:31 AM
Hey guys

I was going through my box of videos yesterday, and two videos I forgot to mention that helped me a LOT, or at least I consider very very cool and helpful are the two Scott Henderson videos by REH.

The first one is about jazz & fusion soloing... what scales and arps to use over which chord etc. He comes up with some very very cool lines there.

The second one is even better... it´s about phrasing. And Scott really explains those well. He compares soloing to speaking ( now I guess you can see where I got that comparison from, since I studied with Scott at the MI ),a nd he explains it very well.
Even if you are not into jazz or fusion, this might be a great inspiration for you !!! ( He also plays a lot of bluesy stuff )
There´s some stuff in there that I haven´t seen covered in any other video, with a very unconventional approach

That second vid inspired me greatly... it´s has a lot of the stuff Scott taught me at the MI... he´s a great teacher, a very cool, funny guy, and an amazing player.
Maybe I should review those vids for ibreathe, huh ?
Eric

dinein
03-03-2004, 04:13 AM
There are a couple of vids that I have found very useful.

The B.B. King trio of DVDs from WB video are very interesting and offer a lot of great insight to his playing.

The Starlicks Tbone Walker with Duke Robbilard is good as well.

Both get into a fair amount of theory and structure and you can come away with some pretty solid licks under your belt.

Also, I have to give it up to Metal Method with Doug Marks. If you are a raw begginner and want to play hard rock... it works well.

Troy Stetina, the Alfred Essentials and Kieth Wyatt's vids are excellent as well. I've found lots of good advice and playing tips from these.

zoso
03-08-2004, 09:45 PM
Sorry guys but I want to answer to Anubis who seems to consider himself a GOD when we talk about music....
I don’t like your attitude man! I don’t disdain the controversy but it’s not a good reason to offend (insult) people (I refer to what you said to ajdowton). The polemic is good when is civil!


Shawn Lane was a decent guitar player but I never heard many lines he played that I cared to much about. But most of all. He didn't write any songs that moved people.

He is a bit like Holdsworth. A good guitar player but he writes music that people don't care to much about.

…..It's an offense again Lynch to be compared to a mediocre guitar player such as Shawn Lane.

Shawn Lane is a mediocre player!!! Oh my god!!! You’re crazy! He was technically phenomenal…. he was different compared to most of the other guitarists, he probably came from another planet!! He toured across the US when he was only 14 when other kids play guitar in their rooms!!! ! Lane's playing is demented, original and exciting and that’s enough to me. He was just great.

Read what these journalists say about Shawn:

...Lane is a truly awe-inspiring guitarist, a man who can seemingly play anything that enters his head, and yet who shows remarkable restraint most of the time.
Rick Anderson

…As much as fusion has grown stale over the years, this trio is pumping some stark vitality into it, keeping it alive. Shawn Lane is the man, and Hellborg has to sit back and marvel at what he's capable of.
Michael G. Nastos


Guitarist Allan Holdsworth is widely considered to be one of the finest instrumentalists in all of jazz fusion, yet has never truly received the recognition that he so rightfully deserves.
Anubis certainly doesn’t know that in 1972, Holdsworth had joined progressive rockers Tempest, appearing on the group's self-titled debut a year later.
He doesn’t know that Holdsworth appeared on the Tony Williams recordings Believe It and Million Dollar Legs.
He doesn’t know that Holdsworth joined up with French-English prog-rockers Gong, in addition to guesting on recordings by Jean-Luc Ponty, Bill Bruford, Gordon Beck, Jack Bruce, UK, and Soft Machine.
So, he was quite busy before launching his solo career!! This means that Holdsworth is certainly a player with a great experience.
I think he’s a true innovator and experimentor and he’s the master of legato technique so if you like it or not Anubis Holdsworth is a point of reference for many players.

S.Lane once said:

I saw Allan Holdsworth when I was about 14 in 1978. I never dreamed a guitar could be played like that and that really changed my whole life. If I hadn't had seen Holdsworth I may have just continued to play some blues and rock music and might have even given it up later or something, but when I saw him at 14, that really inspired me to try to play guitar in my own way at another level.

It’s just another level Anubis!! It’s not for everyone! I know sometimes this music it’s difficult to digest (it can be boring) but when is done well it can be considered pure art!


George Lynch is a Guitar God and a guitar hero. The master of the universe on guitar to my ears. I think that when Lynch dies and goes to heaven God will say "Hey Shawn Lane now Lynch is here. Can you move down a bit"

Lynch is a good guitar player but as Ajdowton said I could name a hundred guitar players better than him……Shawn Lane is one of them.


Well I consider him to be one of the top 10 of the 80's and the 80's is the only decade that's ever been interesting to me. What happened before or after is something I don't care to much about.

Anubis, you think you’re a GOD who can say what is wrong and what is right but all you care about is the music of ‘80’s !!? You’re too presumptuous!! George Lynch wasn’t the first musician to play on this planet so before him maybe there were groups and musicians that even influenced him!!! Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Deep Purple (to name a few) surely played hard music before Dokken many years earlier but who cares about that!! We had the 80’s!! We had George Lynch!!


Zoso

mattyvegas43
09-02-2005, 02:18 PM
Hey that would be great if you could do a review! I'd really like to know about the phrasing video, the only problem is I can't find a shop selling it in England !

Jeansen
09-03-2005, 07:17 AM
how about Stanley Jordan's " guitar master class" n Allan Holdsworth's video? thx u ;)

MattW
09-03-2005, 08:13 AM
Aww I wish I had been here earlier to join the fray, nevermind, let's just say it should be pretty obvious who's side I'm on.;)

TheJeffinator
09-03-2005, 05:31 PM
1: JP's Rock Discipline - I think this is the best technique video I've seen. Michael Angelo's video had some fast licks and he explained different fast playing styles well, but as far as dedicated exercises go, the only thing he offered was trem picking on one string. Rock Discipline covers everything from the minute you pick up your guitar to the minute you put it down - chromatic exercises, scale fragments, combining scalar modules, alternate picked arpeggios, sweep picking, even some chord stuff. Book's good too - you don't get to watch him playing the exercises, but there's more notation and it's easier to work with the big pages than with the VHS/DVD size booklet.

2: Rusty Cooley's Shred Guitar Manifesto - This blew me away. I still don't know what the hell I'm doing when I listen to this guy - if I had heard the cd before the video I wouldn't have believed it. As it was I still had to go get my vision checked after seeing SGM for the first time.

3 & 4: Paul Gilbert's Intense Rock 1 and 2 - very good in terms of playing cleanly and with good articulation, tons of cool licks, and some very useful guitar tricks - some shows just need a rabbit pulled out of the guitar.

5: Marty Friedman's Melodic Control - when I started improvising it was one thing to have a rhythm part to back me up, and another thing entirely to solo on my own with only a drum track, or only a drummer and bassist - before this I didn't really get a grasp of how well outlining chord tones would improve my playing over changes.

6: Frank Gambale's Monster Licks and Sweep Picking - before this video I could play fast but not for very long periods of time. After playing it through a few times I can play fast for just about as long as I need to, provided I don't start cracking up thinking about his cheerleaders trying to keep up with him.

7 & 8: Shawn Lane's Power Licks and Power Solos - Like Rusty Cooley's video, these left me with a hell of a lot to shoot for in terms of technique.

9: Allan Holdsworth's Only For The Curious/Just For The Curious - I hadn't given scales much thought until this, before I had just used target notes and threw in some passing tones, but this helped me think of things in a whole different way.

10: Vinnie Moore's Speed, Accuracy, and Articulation - helped my picking, and gave me a different perspective on modes.

That's it for me.

Rock On,
The Jeffinator

DemonSorcerer
09-03-2005, 07:28 PM
Ok, guys, here we go...

There are certain videos that definitely made a huge impact on my playing...most of them have been discussed here, so i'll just name them...in case there's one that hasn't been named here, i'll be glad to tell about it...here we go, kiddos...

Brett Garsed's Rock Fusion

Paul Gilbert's Intense Rock Series

Greg Howe's Hot Licks: In this one, Howe covers lot of unusual but really helpful techniques techniques, like barring with your fingers...also there are a whole bunch of different arpeggio ideas that can be applied in the REAL WORLD.

Shawn Lane's Power Series ---> NOT TO MENTION THAT I'M A VERY BIG FAN OF SHAWN LANE..."hope you don't mind about that, guys".

Cutting Loose with Reb Beach: For those who love AOR music and tasty guitar playing, you should check this one...Reb's an amazing guitarist, and he's very down-to-earth...he covers a lot of ideas, such as tapping rythm playing and whammy bar manipulation, to name a few topics...he's very detailed when it comes to explaining things, and he's quick to point out that that HIS PERSONAL APPROACH...Love the Intro Song, it has some whammy thingie in the riff...you just gotta love it...plus, it's very ear-catching!!!

Ritchie Kotzen's Hi Tech Rock Guitar: This is one of the newer Kotzen clinics...he plays a nice telecaster on the video and explains sone interesting fusion-oriented licks, as well as many other techniques covered in his virst video...a cool thing he does in the video is that he explains and plays the intro song from beginning to end...the song's called Flashback, and it's a hell of a challenge...it's fusion!!!

Marty Friedman's Melodic Control

Michael Lee Firkins's Mastering Lead Guitar: For those who loved the Saraceno video, you have to take a look at this monster clinic done by a monster player...for those of you who don't know who's Firkins, he's the one that did the song "The end of the beginning" in Jason Becker's Perspective album...going back to the video topic, the guy covers a lot of different styles and techniques, from fiongerpicking to whammy bar manipulation, rythm playing and shred techniques and licks...pretty interesting, and a truly learning experience, even when his teaching style can be a lil' boring...not everyone was born to be a guitar tutor, i think...

Well..that lil' list is actually top-of-mind...there are, of course, more videos, it's just that i can't remember about them..if i do, i'll be glad to post it with a lil' review if necessary...

David

Dushan S
09-03-2005, 10:49 PM
I was dissapointed with a lot of videos I had to chance to watch. A lot of them are just recycling of already known material, especially videos from various "shred" virtuosos. Exceptions may be Gilberts and Vinnie Moores videos, they are really usefull, and give some basics to build on.

Lot of people raves about "Rock Discipline" video, but it was of no use to me. Like Petrucci was trying to put too much in it and ended saying nothing at the end.

On the other hand most usefull videos I had chance to watch were Eric Johnson videos, they really made me realise how many new doors are there to open, highly reccomended.

Watching Lee Firkins video was like "Hey this guy has really unique style, great playing". And it was clear that most of it is useles if I do not want to play in that specific style. At least for me. Great vibrato arm technique!

Gambale is nice. I could accurately say that it was half-good for me :D as after working on his exercises I have incorporated sweep picking in a very strange way, I mostly sweep while descending, and tend to play alternate when ascending, somehow it works best for me that way. :)

b-string
09-06-2005, 01:22 PM
Here is a free Marty Friedman video lesson:

http://www.freelicks.net/Valley_of_eternity1.htm

:)

misery
09-11-2005, 10:22 AM
Both of Scott Henderson helped me/is still helping me and I highly recommend them.

The Holdsworth video is fun for those who want to study his approach to playing. For funk, you don't get a better video than Funk Rhythm Guitar by Ross Bolton. For country playing, Brent Mason's video is cool and for jazz/blues, I'd recommend Robben Ford's videos.

Have anyone seen the new Garsed DVD?

I've gotta get hold on that Michael Lee Firkins video, as my relationship with the whammy is similar to the one I've got with my... my... uh. :p

DemonSorcerer
09-11-2005, 08:53 PM
Have anyone seen the new Garsed DVD?

Hopefully, it will arrive at my door in the coming days...i ordered straight from Brett's site (well, i didn't, actually...i told my best friend to order it, since she lives in Australia, and Brett's living over there atm)...i'm dying to watch that video, since i'm a fan of the Rock Fusion one...

David

NickGT
09-13-2005, 01:26 AM
Here is a free Marty Friedman video lesson:

http://www.freelicks.net/Valley_of_eternity1.htm

:)

If by lesson you mean "hey, watch me play this" then yes.

widdly widdly
09-14-2005, 01:59 AM
My favourites are..

Paul Gilbert - Intense Rock II - Spent a whole summer in front of this one. Really great stuff and good fun.

Tuck Andress - Fingerstyle Jazz Guitar - This one is a real mind blower. You really have to see him play a "Man in a Mirror", it's amazing. This video will keep you going for years. Each little section will take you months to master. Tuck is really humble and is a great teacher. This guy is better than Shawn Lane and George Lynch put together ;)

All the Frank Gambale videos are great too. The only trouble is Frank's wardrobe. He really needs a stylist ;)

The ones I really don't like are...

Zakk Wylde - Pentatonic Wankfest - Zakk comes across as a complete wanker. Too much attitude not enough education.

Yngwie Malmsteen - Everything Too Fast - Yngwie plays everything too fast. It's like he is scared you might learn all his riffs, buy some tight pants and put him out of buisness.
________
Bdsm punishment (http://www.****tube.com/categories/247/punishment/videos/1)

JailHouseRock
09-15-2005, 03:38 AM
I plan to get Marty Friedman, Exotic Metal Guitar or Melodic Control.
Which one would be a better choice?

TheJeffinator
09-16-2005, 12:50 AM
Definitely Melodic Control. If you can't use odd note groupings and odd scales, or don't like your phrasing, or something along those lines, get them both. Melodic Control was put out after EMG, which was from his Cacophony days, whereas Melodic Control came out after Countdown to Extinction, and by this time not only was his playing more recognizable, he was able to put his points across better.

Rock On,
The Jeffinator

EricV
09-16-2005, 12:16 PM
I guess its the same as with choosing a teacher... some teachers you click with, some you don´t. Some people love Rock Discipline, others didn´t consider it useful. To me, that one is a good video... not as flashy as some of the REH videos ( which to me often seemed to be more of a promo-video. Greg Howe said that he wasn´t given enough time to prepare his vid thoroughly, for example )
The good thing about RD is that John shows you how to use a metronome, actually demonstrates it. Many of the licks in those REH vids are played without.

I´d like to point out that I think the following: You should get one video at first, and then really work with that. The first one I got was "Intense Rock" ( still recommend it a lot ), and back then, I just didn´t have the money to buy 3 more the next week.
And that vid had a lot of stuff to work on, so I spent weeks and months with it until I bought something else.
The same thing that is true for books is true for videos: If you get too many of them at a time, you might find yourself skipping from one to the next, never really working with or focussing on one of them.
Variety is good, but if you i.e. work with IR, the licks build onto each other. So if you watch IR, a Gambale vid, a Friedman vid and "Rock Chops" in one day, you might have some new ideas, but you don´t have a starting point.
Focus on one thing for a while before switching to the next
Eric

Duncan123
03-28-2006, 05:55 PM
One video no-one has mentioned is Tony Macalpine's Master Session. Tony's shows some great licks including his unique hammer on from nowhere sweeps and his slap style! His picking is also really clean!

The only place i can find these vids everyone is tlking about is sheetmusicplus.com. ne1 know of somewhere cheaper that ships to england?

what were shawn lanes vids like? are they more instructional or motivational?

cheers
duncan

TheJeffinator
03-28-2006, 11:25 PM
Amazon should have them - I know they have Rock Discipline, I've seen Marty Friedman's videos on there, and Paul Gilbert stuff is everywhere. I'm surprised that other stores don't, but it can't be helped.

What I like about Rock Discipline, Intense Rock, and Melodic Control is that they are much more than lick videos, which Macalpine's video seems to be in more ways than not - it's more about having a bigger trick bag at the end of the video than really advancing and bringing new *concepts* in, like the first three.

Shawn Lane's videos were very motivational *and* instructional (in the aforementioned *advancing* sense, not just cool licks). His was an entirely new approach, and rather than just having the viewer play the same licks he played he focused on incorporating all sorts of different elements and 'little things' that noone else would have thought of in a million years - even doing a descending 4 note coil run, he would go between picking and legato in ways that made no sense to anyone who wasn't writing it down, and rather than sounding like either an exercise or a Malmsteen rip-off he made it sound like it was all just coming out of thin air and not an elementary, rudimentary dexterity routine.

Rock On,
The Jeffinator

Friday
05-29-2006, 10:27 PM
Both really good videos with great info... but, you will have to develop a lot of speed to make a lot of the info contained in them usable.

How much speed?

joeyd929
05-30-2006, 01:23 AM
Check out this link. http://www.jimibell.com/

Jimi Bell came in second to Zak Wylde in 1986 for the Ozzy audition. Check out some of his shred videos at his site.. Gotta use Internet Explorer. One video is from 1985 of him doing a solo at the 1985 NAMM show in California..

He lives in Connecticut, about 10 miles from me now and I used to go to the music store where he worked to watch and drool. He most plays locally now but he is an unsung hero of shred...fo sho. I just can't afford the 40 bucks an hour for lessons.

Joe

Crucifix
05-30-2006, 08:01 PM
My favourites are..

Yngwie Malmsteen - Everything Too Fast - Yngwie plays everything too fast. It's like he is scared you might learn all his riffs, buy some tight pants and put him out of buisness.

I fell off the chair reading this, great stuff. :p

joeyd929
05-31-2006, 12:47 AM
I fell off the chair reading this, great stuff. :p

If I had the technique that Yngwee has, I would love that but I HATE the music he uses. I would use that technique for Jazz or classical.

TheJeffinator
05-31-2006, 05:01 AM
The ones I really don't like are...

Zakk Wylde - Pentatonic Wankfest - Zakk comes across as a complete wanker. Too much attitude not enough education.

Yngwie Malmsteen - Everything Too Fast - Yngwie plays everything too fast. It's like he is scared you might learn all his riffs, buy some tight pants and put him out of buisness.

Agree with the top one - not much into ZW at all. His tone bugs me more than most people's tones usually do. Now that I think about it, I never got into the Rhoads tone either - too much fuzz, teddy bears just aren't that metal.

As for the bottom one, I might have agreed if it weren't for all of the clones that completely failed to put him out of business. There seems to be a 'right' speed for most licks - just take a look at the all-too-common four note cluster that everyone knows (1234 2345 3456 and the other way around). At slow speeds it sounds like an exercise, at moderate speeds it has its place, at higher speeds it kinda goes back to sounding like an exercise. Turning again to all of the neoclassical clones, we see how tiring it gets, but then looking at how Shawn Lane did it, or how Arch Enemy put it to use in Ravenous, or how Yngwie throws it in on offbeats, it shows itself to have use. Same goes for the same old pentatonic licks that everyone has been using since the birth of blues - slowly they sound soulful, moderate to high speeds they can be used well in a more rock/metal context (think Judas Priest), too high and they're a mess. I don't think he has much of anything to be afraid of - he just wants the licks to sound like he thinks they should, and since they're not really that hard to figure out once you get used to him, I can't see where the problem is.

Rock On,
The Jeffinator

joeyd929
05-31-2006, 11:23 AM
Agree with the top one - not much into ZW at all. His tone bugs me more than most people's tones usually do. Now that I think about it, I never got into the Rhoads tone either - too much fuzz, teddy bears just aren't that metal.

As for the bottom one, I might have agreed if it weren't for all of the clones that completely failed to put him out of business. There seems to be a 'right' speed for most licks - just take a look at the all-too-common four note cluster that everyone knows (1234 2345 3456 and the other way around). At slow speeds it sounds like an exercise, at moderate speeds it has its place, at higher speeds it kinda goes back to sounding like an exercise. Turning again to all of the neoclassical clones, we see how tiring it gets, but then looking at how Shawn Lane did it, or how Arch Enemy put it to use in Ravenous, or how Yngwie throws it in on offbeats, it shows itself to have use. Same goes for the same old pentatonic licks that everyone has been using since the birth of blues - slowly they sound soulful, moderate to high speeds they can be used well in a more rock/metal context (think Judas Priest), too high and they're a mess. I don't think he has much of anything to be afraid of - he just wants the licks to sound like he thinks they should, and since they're not really that hard to figure out once you get used to him, I can't see where the problem is.

Rock On,
The Jeffinator

I think the thing that made Yngwee unique is his choice of melodic phrasing. Others have played fast..Jeff Gilbert, Vinnie Moore, etc.. But Yngwee had as you said, the right speed. I saw him play with Alcatraz in the 80's from front row and it was bizarre to see someone play that fast..and inspiring. Makes you want to either go home and play or trash your guitar.

newamerikangosp
06-01-2006, 11:12 PM
People that are posting that they didn't pick up anything from videos are wrong. Even if you don't set down and learn every lick note by note, you (I will almost guarentee) the you will emulate what you have seen or go about doing your favorite little lick a little bit differently. I can say that I have always gone about emulating a (cioto? Some type of japense/chinese instrument that is kinda like a 12 string. Every note is also followed by the octave of the note higher. Kyoto or something like that) By sounding the lower note, tapping the higher octave, switch note, tap, switch note, tap, ect. But I saw john petrucci doing it as a "chord". He would play the lower note and then while sustaining it, play the higher note in the standard octave position. It emulated it alot better then I was with just tapping, and since they are the same note different octave, you don't have to worry about the distorion causing overtone "clutter". This wasn't even on an "instructional" video, just on the scenes from a memory dvd.

The point is that whether they are teaching you or not, you can learn from them. Watch what they do, how they group notes, do they use octave displacement? If you want to learn you will. Just don't expect to learn everything at once. That is what practice is for, and its worked for centuries

joeyd929
06-01-2006, 11:34 PM
People that are posting that they didn't pick up anything from videos are wrong. Even if you don't set down and learn every lick note by note, you (I will almost guarentee) the you will emulate what you have seen or go about doing your favorite little lick a little bit differently. I can say that I have always gone about emulating a (cioto? Some type of japense/chinese instrument that is kinda like a 12 string. Every note is also followed by the octave of the note higher. Kyoto or something like that) By sounding the lower note, tapping the higher octave, switch note, tap, switch note, tap, ect. But I saw john petrucci doing it as a "chord". He would play the lower note and then while sustaining it, play the higher note in the standard octave position. It emulated it alot better then I was with just tapping, and since they are the same note different octave, you don't have to worry about the distorion causing overtone "clutter". This wasn't even on an "instructional" video, just on the scenes from a memory dvd.

The point is that whether they are teaching you or not, you can learn from them. Watch what they do, how they group notes, do they use octave displacement? If you want to learn you will. Just don't expect to learn everything at once. That is what practice is for, and its worked for centuries

I personally learn alot from watching videos, or watching other players. I ususally watch things like how they hold their hands, how they play in positions, all kinds of things. I even watch piano players because there is always something to learn.

TheJeffinator
06-02-2006, 01:33 AM
That's a very good point, and I think I'm an idiot for missing it myself. I remember seeing somewhere a video of John McLaughlin doing a duet with some pianist (Katia Labeque, I think) and somehow I learned more from her phrasing and the way she worked with McLaughlin (who, I should add, is a huge influence on me) than I have from most guitar videos - including several that have been listed here. Violinist Jerry Goodman (original Mahavishnu member) did the same thing somehow.

Rock On,
The Jeffinator

joeyd929
06-02-2006, 04:34 AM
That's a very good point, and I think I'm an idiot for missing it myself. I remember seeing somewhere a video of John McLaughlin doing a duet with some pianist (Katia Labeque, I think) and somehow I learned more from her phrasing and the way she worked with McLaughlin (who, I should add, is a huge influence on me) than I have from most guitar videos - including several that have been listed here. Violinist Jerry Goodman (original Mahavishnu member) did the same thing somehow.

Rock On,
The Jeffinator

Rock On,
The Jeffinator[/QUOTE]

Another point of watching videos and performers, for me, especially guitar players is that I always what what fingers they use. My point is if you watch Eric Clapton, he does use his fourth finger for chords and some solos but a majority of his solos utilize the first three fingers.

Even George Benson, if you really watch close he uses his first three fingers more often then the fourth, but he has obvious command over all his fingers.

Most teachers teach the "KFD" method, (keep fingers down) which is basically like classical training where you keep your fingers as close as possiole for the most economical and efficient movement...HOWEVER...

Watch players like Pat Metheney or Rusty Cooley. www.rustycooley.com
and you will notice that their fingers flail very far away from the fingerboard but it works for them.

Yngwee Malmsteen uses ALL his fingers and as fast as he is, he pretty much repeats himself over and over, using quite basic patterns, I might add. It's just the level to which he can acquire speed that is amazing.

As much as the technique impresses me I get quite bored after a while with that stuff. Anyway, back to watching players....So much to see and learn.....

pfizer
05-22-2007, 04:31 PM
Hi guys. Erm, I hope I don't get flamed or banned for reviving an old thread but I really need your help! I was searching the board for a topic on instructional books and DVDs and I found this thread. I love how the bad ones are also mentioned :D

Birthday's coming up in a bit so instead of saving up for a guitar, I've decided to save up for guitar lesson DVDs. My schedule is pretty tight (I'm working to get through Nursing school) so a way to learn guitar that's convenient and complete is a must for me. The only DVD I have is Rock Discipline by John Petrucci which is great for building chops and exercises but it's kinda lacking in the theory department. :o

I'm considering getting Learn and Master Guitar by Steve Krenz but it's pretty pricey. A lotta sites say that it's really good though. Cheaper DVDs I've looked at were Rockhouse Method and the 2007 version of Metal Method by Doug Marks also keep popping up in my research. Anybody have any suggestions? :)

Crossroads
05-22-2007, 04:51 PM
A vital question is, what standard are you? And,…what are you aiming to learn or achieve from the DVD?

You sort of hinted that you want something that teaches you theory…and I guess you want it to do that by learning lots of licks & phrases with the guitar in hand, ie as opposed to just learning theory on paper?

Do you need to learn about theory & practice of which scales & modes to use for soling over various chord’s, that sort of thing? Is that want we’re talking about? :)

Ian.

tedmaul
05-23-2007, 05:47 PM
Hey guys

I was going through my box of videos yesterday, and two videos I forgot to mention that helped me a LOT, or at least I consider very very cool and helpful are the two Scott Henderson videos by REH.

The first one is about jazz & fusion soloing... what scales and arps to use over which chord etc. He comes up with some very very cool lines there.

The second one is even better... it´s about phrasing. And Scott really explains those well. He compares soloing to speaking ( now I guess you can see where I got that comparison from, since I studied with Scott at the MI ),a nd he explains it very well.
Even if you are not into jazz or fusion, this might be a great inspiration for you !!! ( He also plays a lot of bluesy stuff )
There´s some stuff in there that I haven´t seen covered in any other video, with a very unconventional approach

That second vid inspired me greatly... it´s has a lot of the stuff Scott taught me at the MI... he´s a great teacher, a very cool, funny guy, and an amazing player.
Maybe I should review those vids for ibreathe, huh ?
Eric

Finally! I'd been reading through this thread there thinking i was gonna have to be the first to post about those vids! :D

tbh i'm not even sure you can still get the Scott Henderson videos in the Uk anymore, but i thought they were fantastic when i was using them years ago. The Melodic Phrasing one i found particularly great - a topic rarely covered in any detail and yet sorely lacking in the playing of so many guitar players.

I would also recommend any of the Frank Gambale vids or books - particularly his ones on Modes and The Gambale Technique Book (which covers what scales/arps to play over which harmonies). I'm not a fan of the man's music at all but he is an excellent teacher - very concise - tells you exactly what you need to know in as simple a way as possible.

In terms of the vids out there focused purely on physical techniques, as most others have already mentioned the Petrucci and PG one's are probably the pick of the bunch. Though Petrucci can be like watching paint dry at times! :D At least PG is a bit more dynamic and amusing in his presentation...

pfizer
05-23-2007, 05:55 PM
A vital question is, what standard are you? And,…what are you aiming to learn or achieve from the DVD?

You sort of hinted that you want something that teaches you theory…and I guess you want it to do that by learning lots of licks & phrases with the guitar in hand, ie as opposed to just learning theory on paper?

Do you need to learn about theory & practice of which scales & modes to use for soling over various chord’s, that sort of thing? Is that want we’re talking about? :)

Ian.

That's EXACTLY what I am talking about; in terms of technique, I am probably slightly above average but still no expert. When it comes to theory, it's pretty much zilch.

Here are key things I want to know and learn:
- How to find what key a song is in
- What solo to play over a chord progression/improvisation
- What the HELL am I playing most of the time*
- Keys,Scales, modes, naming a chord, composition, the works
- Playing a song by ear; being able to just "JAM".

I have been trying to learn how to "shred" for the past year now but since I suck at theory and no where near proficient with technique, I am going no where. I have mentioned Rock Discipline though and it's helped tremendously with alternate picking (I haven't gone through the whole thing yet).

I have no idea what to play when someone mentions "the song is in the key of _____."

A secondary technique I've been trying to learn is fingerstlye but books don't help much since I learn best with visual aids (I've heard that 90% of people are visual learners). I have been listening to a lot of fingerstyle guitarists like Chet Atkins, Don Ross, Andy McKee, Tommy Emmanuel and John Mayer whose song "Neon" is probably the most difficult thing I can perform with fingerstyle right now.


* I learn most of my stuff through tab or by someone teaching me; I have never played by ear though I have tried and have gotten nowhere. I know almost nothing about keys, scales and modes. I do know how to find notes on the fretboard but have no idea how to apply it.

tedmaul
05-23-2007, 06:06 PM
That's EXACTLY what I am talking about; in terms of technique, I am probably slightly above average but still no expert. When it comes to theory, it's pretty much zilch.

Here are key things I want to know and learn:
- How to find what key a song is in
- What solo to play over a chord progression/improvisation
- What the HELL am I playing most of the time*
- Keys,Scales, modes, naming a chord, composition, the works
- Playing a song by ear; being able to just "JAM".


Does it really need to be a video?

Personally, i think if you're starting these topics at that kind of level then there's not many vids/dvd's out there that will really help you that i know of. The Gambale and Henderson stuff is excellent but imo it's geared towards players with an intermediate understanding of the topics already.

However i do know some books that cover this stuff v. well. Guthrie Govan's Creative Guitar 1 & 2 books with cd's are fantastic and would benefit you a lot. He's an excellent teacher and player if you don't know who he is. PLenty vids on Youtube if you're interested.

Get the books here:

http://www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/042224/details.html

http://www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/056088/details.html

graypianoflying
05-23-2007, 08:12 PM
Like tedmaul said, if that's all you're looking for, you're probably better off getting a book. Really, any basic theory book should do it, no need to get one by a big name player. "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Music Theory" or something similar would tell you most of those things.

Crossroads
05-23-2007, 08:58 PM
That's EXACTLY what I am talking about ... I want to know and learn:
- How to find what key a song is in
- What solo to play over a chord progression/improvisation
- What the HELL am I playing most of the time*
- Keys,Scales, modes, naming a chord, composition, the works
- Playing a song by ear; being able to just "JAM".

Good, that’s precisely why I asked. And it’s exactly what I expected (because it applies to 9 out of 10 players). And in view of that, I’m going to ignore the fact that you’ve been using the Petrucci DVD, ie I’m going to assume you can’t yet play like Petrucci (for all the reason’s you list).

OK, well I hope Russ will forgive me for mentioning the same 3 DVD’s again, but imho these are exactly what you need. I.e. - three DVD’s from Danny Gill ….1.Rock Essentials, 2.Rock Concepts, 3.Advanced Rock Guitar (they're, all from Lick Library... you can get them on-line from Musicroom.com ... no connection to me).

The first one (“Essentials”) will give you a clear grounding in pentatonic scales & their use in soloing over chord progressions in various keys. Only you can decide if that’s too basic for you, and whether you can safely skip that one (but don’t dismiss it too lightly).

The second DVD (“Concepts”) will extend that with more scales, scale sequences, soloing with those sequences using alt. picking, sweep picking & arpeggios to compose riff’s & licks, and that’s all set in the context of a theory explanation with solid practical examples.

The third DVD (“Advanced”), continues the same teaching of theory & soloing, but begins by explaining Harmonization of the major scale into triads & 7th chords, and immediately goes on to modes & teaches licks & solos in each major mode ie Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian etc. The second half of the DVD deals with soloing over chords outside the Key and explains borrowed chords and Secondary Dominants.

Danny Gill is by far the best & clearest teacher I’ve seen on any DVD, and together those three will give you a good start on theory & the application of theory to soloing & improvising with scales & modes over chords & progressions. Every note he plays is clearly explained ... and the musical ideas & licks are so good I'm surprised he's giving them away (but that's you're gain).

Having said all that, there’s a new DVD which does more or less all of the above in one go. That is “Scales & the Chords That Fit Them” by Stuart Bull. Not surprisingly that DVD is very long, ie on 2 disks over 4 hours. The downside is that although Stewart is good teacher, he’s nowhere near as clear as Danny Gill, and because of the amount of material covered, it does not explain the basic theory & principles in the clear way that Danny Gill’s DVD’s do. The other thing is that Stuart Bull’s solo examples are not as musical or as refined as Danny’s…however the solo examples are much longer & very numerous (in many styles, inc. long jazz runs), in fact they’re so long it will take you months just to Tab them out for your own notes (there’s no Tab included in any of these DVD’s ... that's typical of all modern DVD's, none of them will include TAB, but you can clearly see everything that's played).

Anyway, just to be clear - Stewart Bull’s DVD is all about which scales and modes to use for soling over different chords & progressions … it will not teach you a clear grounding in theory of scales & modes in the way Danny Gill does, and the DVD is not arranged or ordered in such a clear logical way, so it will seem more like hard work, but if you stick with it & untangle it a bit then it will provide a lot of what you want in a single product.... and it does contain masses of stuff.

There’s much more I could mention, inc. various books & CD’s etc., but for what you want, I think the above 4 are really the bottom line (& frankly, they’re bargains). :)

Ian.

Crossroads
05-23-2007, 09:44 PM
Yep, also agree with Tedmaul about those two books/CD’s from Guthrie Govan & I’ve recommended those myself on previous threads here (although DVD’s obviously have big advantage of seeing exactly what the guy is talking about, they're more direct ...but Guthrie's stuff is great for long term reference and loads of modern excercises etc.) :)

Ian.

pfizer
05-24-2007, 11:29 AM
Okay guys, thanks for the responses. I'll be sure to check out Guthrie Govan's books and LickLibrary.

I might not be able to post for a while so I'm going to ask about some things now before I forget :p

1) Do you have any opinions on the other DVDs I mentioned previously (Rockhouse and Metal Method)? Somebody is offering me copies of the DVDs but since money is really tight right now, I have to make sure of the quality before I buy. I know that Metal Method has been around for quite some time now since I see ads for it in guitar magazines. I just haven't seen any reviews of it or anybody who testifies to learning from it (exept for that one guy, shredder Rusty Cooley whose music is a bit too mechanical for my taste). Rockhouse Method is said to be one of the best selling instructionals today and even got a favorable review in Musician'sFriend.com but I still want to know what you guys think since the full guitar course from Beginner to Advanced will still set me back quite a bit. Learn and Master Guitar looks very good but its kinda pricey. Any opinions on that? :confused:

2) As for books, I found three that I think would be best suited for my needs: Fretboard Logic by Bill Edwards, Guitar Fretboard Workbook by Barrett Tagliarino and MJS Total Scales and Applications by Mark J. Sternal keep popping up when I search on Google or musician websites. It keeps talking about CAGED which I know is something used to memorize the fretboard. Do the Guthrie Govan books teach something like that as well?

Mandz
05-31-2007, 03:49 PM
1) i have two different versions of metal method (i bought them all - just cos i am a completist and wanted them all) and they are not bad at all. very clear, though i am not a fan of the tabledit software it uses for tabs. the theory section (dvd 6 in the latest version i think - just got mine 2 days ago) covers theory mainly as it applies to rock. mention is made of different scales and how to make them and how to construct chords but it is made clear that unless you want to play music other than rock/metal, you will probably not use many of them. actually, it really is a good method.

learn and master guitar is good, and worth the money, but it is a course which you need to sit through and master one step at a time. its not good for just dipping into. that said, if you're a beginner, i would recommend it highly. it teaches you how to read music as well.

rockhouse, i have one of their dvds, which was just finger excercises. i don't think it is all that good since it doesn't really make much mention of what practice is or how to do it effectively.

i personally would recommend the lick library dvds. i thoroughly agree with Crossroads on that score. the danny gill dvds are the best IMHO. there are some technique vids on the website you can stream by Guthrie Govan which are fantastic. the new metal licks dvds are not bad either.

i wish they would tab out the examples though, cos clear as they are on-screen, sometimes you don't want to have to have to watch the dvd just to practice some licks/excercises.

2) the guthrie govan books do cover the same material (and in a more engaging way if you ask me)

Crossroads
05-31-2007, 05:30 PM
Yeah I agree – I’d also like full printed TAB with those Lick Library DVD’s. But it needs to be clearly laid out on A4 format, not like the scruffy little booklets that come with the rather useless Hot Licks series, & I guess a decent A4 Tab book would probably double the cost of the DVD?

I’m also really enjoying Chris Juergensen’s book, which is gives a very comprehensive breakdown of chords & chord construction in the context of progressions, plus an in depth look at scales & modes in the context of soling applications…the whole thing is very much directed at setting the work in a musical context rather than just presenting diagrams and facts for reference…it’s passing on a lifetimes knowledge & it clearly shows. I don’t think it’s really for complete beginners, but it’s great for anyone who’s serious about playing (makes a perfect partner to the 2 books from Guthrie Govan) :)

But one other thing I should add – good as all these modern DVDs & new books are (and they are fantastic), I’d still rather have a good personal teacher whatever the cost, but unfortunately I just can’t seem to find one (even in London) :( .


Ian.

pfizer
06-01-2007, 08:52 AM
Yeah I agree – I’d also like full printed TAB with those Lick Library DVD’s. But it needs to be clearly laid out on A4 format, not like the scruffy little booklets that come with the rather useless Hot Licks series, & I guess a decent A4 Tab book would probably double the cost of the DVD?

I’m also really enjoying Chris Juergensen’s book, which is gives a very comprehensive breakdown of chords & chord construction in the context of progressions, plus an in depth look at scales & modes in the context of soling applications…the whole thing is very much directed at setting the work in a musical context rather than just presenting diagrams and facts for reference…it’s passing on a lifetimes knowledge & it clearly shows. I don’t think it’s really for complete beginners, but it’s great for anyone who’s serious about playing (makes a perfect partner to the 2 books from Guthrie Govan) :)

But one other thing I should add – good as all these modern DVDs & new books are (and they are fantastic), I’d still rather have a good personal teacher whatever the cost, but unfortunately I just can’t seem to find one (even in London) :( .


Ian.

I'm having the very same problem with teachers here. All of them are either just looking for a quick buck or just plain suck.

I think I'll go for the Lick Library series. Besides the Rock series with Danny Gill, are there any other DVDs from LL that you can recommend?



1) i have two different versions of metal method (i bought them all - just cos i am a completist and wanted them all) and they are not bad at all. very clear, though i am not a fan of the tabledit software it uses for tabs. the theory section (dvd 6 in the latest version i think - just got mine 2 days ago) covers theory mainly as it applies to rock. mention is made of different scales and how to make them and how to construct chords but it is made clear that unless you want to play music other than rock/metal, you will probably not use many of them. actually, it really is a good method.

learn and master guitar is good, and worth the money, but it is a course which you need to sit through and master one step at a time. its not good for just dipping into. that said, if you're a beginner, i would recommend it highly. it teaches you how to read music as well.

rockhouse, i have one of their dvds, which was just finger excercises. i don't think it is all that good since it doesn't really make much mention of what practice is or how to do it effectively.

i personally would recommend the lick library dvds. i thoroughly agree with Crossroads on that score. the danny gill dvds are the best IMHO. there are some technique vids on the website you can stream by Guthrie Govan which are fantastic. the new metal licks dvds are not bad either.

i wish they would tab out the examples though, cos clear as they are on-screen, sometimes you don't want to have to have to watch the dvd just to practice some licks/excercises.

2) the guthrie govan books do cover the same material (and in a more engaging way if you ask me)

Hey dude, thanks for answering my questions. Question about the Govan books though; aside from scales and modes, does it teach chord progressions too? The first 2 volumes of Fretboard Logic apparently doesn't teach it.

Crossroads
06-01-2007, 02:31 PM
Besides the Rock series with Danny Gill, are there any other DVDs from LL that you can recommend?

The short answer is - I think you’re pretty safe with anything from Lick Library.:)

Long answer - different people may prefer different products of course, I mean maybe some guys won’t like the Lick Library DVD’s or won’t like Danny Gill’s teaching (I think that’s unlikely). So, just be sure you know what's on those 3 DVD's from Gill - they're teaching basic theory of scales, keys, modes, chords & progressions, and it's all about how to solo with those ideas. Although 3 titles say "Rock", the licks inc. plenty of blues phrases (as does all rock) and also plenty of faster metal/shred style licks.

But a great deal depends on the teacher. Eg, I also like their 2 Steve Vai DVD’s, which cover all the stuff from Eat em & Smile., taught by Gill, Guthrie Govan, & Dave Killminster … Gill & Govan are fine, but personally I don’t like Killmister (he’s not so clear, and he annoys me lol!).

Actually, the two main LL teachers are Stewart Bull & Jamie Humphries. They’re both OK, but not as clear & precise as Gill. E.g. Bull has a recent 4 hour double DVD which covers a huge amount of material on soloing with scales & modes against various chords/progressions … it’s great if you need to learn that stuff (how to solo), but it’s hard work compared to Gill’s DVD’s simply because Bull is less clear and his material isn’t so well organized ... but that DVD is still a great buy if you’re prepared to work a bit harder on it.

Just to mention some other publishers - the Classic Masterclass series are all priced under Ł10 and whilst they’re much shorter and not so clear as LL, some of them do have collections of great licks. Eg I like Wolf Marshall’s one on Yngwie Malmsteen…Marshall looks pretty crazy, and the playing is fast of course, but it has loads of great sounding licks if you like neo-classical shred stuff. Also the Signature Licks series from Hal Leonard, which are DVD versions of their well known songbooks/CD’s covering various famous players in some detail, eg Scott Ainslie has a very good, albeit short, DVD on Robert Johnson’s acoustic blues style (impressive presentation from Ainslie).

Also - the Joe Satriani DVD from Cherry Lane publishing is really excellent with 6 titles nfn on two disks, but surprise surprise that’s also taught by Gill and was even made in association with Lick Lib lol! Anyway, if you like Satriani, then that’s a terrific DVD (it’s all teaching, no time wasted on performance footage).

Finally 2 other titles I like, but really for more advanced players (don’t say I didn’t warn you lol) – Paul Gilbert “Get Out of My Yard” in which he describes his approach to songwriting and lick construction for the titles on that album. And Robben Ford “The Blues and Beyond”, which covers his style of Blues-jazz fusion (so expect lots of strange jazz chords lol).

Ian.

Mandz
06-01-2007, 02:40 PM
I think I'll go for the Lick Library series. Besides the Rock series with Danny Gill, are there any other DVDs from LL that you can recommend?

as far as LL dvds, i'd recommend the fretboard navigator, and "how to play fast" volues 1+2, and "killer licks", both by Dave Kilminster (badass guitarist, but his sense off humour is a bit weird). If you like metal, then the new metal techniques dvds are pretty good, though not brilliant. these are some of the LL dvd's that i have. i have more LL dvd's but i don't think they were that great (Ultimate Guitar - Sweep Picking Techniques by Stuart Bull is one of them that stands out as being a waste of my hard earned). its kind of hit and miss with the technique/theory dvds, if you ask me. some are genuinely useful. others, less so. i've also got "how to get a great guitar sound" by andy casswell, and that is not particularly good IMHO.


Hey dude, thanks for answering my questions. Question about the Govan books though; aside from scales and modes, does it teach chord progressions too? The first 2 volumes of Fretboard Logic apparently doesn't teach it.

as far as chord progression, i can't remember off the top of my head (i'm at work and don't have the books to hand), but i'm pretty sure he talks you through them.

Crossroads
06-01-2007, 04:42 PM
Mandz – what do you think of Jamie Humphries as an instructor on those LL DVD’s (that’s not a “loaded” question lol…just wondered what you thought of him)?

Yeah maybe I was a bit hard on Kilminster - his playing is fine & he normally chooses nice stuff … doesn’t mind making a few mistakes either, which is refreshing since we all do that (well I do anyway!) …but he just annoys me…personal thing I guess …but I agree he may be fine for others.

Paul Gilbert is also a v.good instructor of course, but we’ve mentioned him lots of times re. Intense Rock (mainly fast alt. picking practice routines).

Ian.

ps - the Govan Books have very little on Chord Progressions, but Chris Juergensen's book has loads about chords & progressions.

pfizer
06-07-2007, 10:03 AM
Hi again guys. Sorry for not posting for so long.

I'm in a bit of jam here and long story short, money's pretty scarce. Because of that, my parents said I could get one, and ONLY ONE of "those guitar DVDs" for myself. I need something that is complete and comprehensive and so far here are the top three:

- Metal Method
- Lick Library
- Learn and Master Guitar by Steve Krenz (this thing costs $240 :eek: , but if it's THAT GOOD....)

This time, I REALLY need your help guys. I don't want to give up guitar playing and learning...

Mandz
06-11-2007, 02:14 PM
sorry i've taken ages getting back to you:

Crossroads (Ian): I think Jamie Humphries is actually a good teacher, though his playing is sometimes a lot sloppier that i would expect of someone in his position. he does give solid information though.

pfizer: I personally prefer the Lick Library stuff, cos I am really just a rock player and the Steve Krenz stuff is just a bit too detailed for my tastes - it starts off from a COMPLETE beginner's perspective, though he does have some useful tips (for instance, he recommends that you don't buy a bleeping metronome that its better to have one that actually makes a clicking/knocking sound, which is something i have found to be helpful). If you're interested in learning to read music, then this course is the best of the three you have listed. you won't learn that with Metal Method or Lick Library.

Slightly off-topic, what are the rules about posting links to useful video lessons (on youtube and such) on this forum?

pfizer
06-12-2007, 06:53 AM
Hey guys, thanks for the replies!

Well, I asked my parents (read: groveled ) for Learn and Master Guitar and the exact words from my dad was "WTF?! $240!! You'd better be able to play guitar with your d*** at that price!". So yeah....:p

Anyway, guess I'll try Metal Method. Turns out we don't have Lick Library here in the Philippines. I was actually going to try and order Learn and Master Guitar online but my parents don't allow Internet purchasing :rolleyes:

Also, I just saw my new class schedule (I'm finally a senior in Nursing :) ! ) and it's insane. I need something to dip into during the weekends instead of just watching TV and playing videogames so I'm betting LaMG is not the best choice for that (based on what Mandz said). I might consider Metal Method as soon as I find a copy where the video and audio is in sync and the material is tabbed out :mad: . Also for Mandz, I actually play a lot of Punk rock when I jam with friends but I'm a closet acousticblues/progressive/metal fan ;) . So I guess I NEED that detailed teaching for a more solid foundation.

On another note, I found several other DVDs and I wanna know what you guys think of them:

1) Killer Pro Soloing Secrets by Tony Burnett - I've been seeing ads for this in magazines almost for as long as Metal Method (though no where near as popular) and it claims some outrageous things like turning kids into virtuousos overnight. Sounds like bull to me already but I'm asking you guys if there any grain of truth in the ad.

2) This Is The Way I Do It by John McLaughlin - This is very similar to Learn And Master Guitar because of the price ( $240!!!OMG) and the quality of the package. It seems to be aimed at the more advanced players though since apparently there's no tab option and the exercises are quite advanced. It also focuses more on improvisation so I guess you would have to have a solid musical foundation already.

Here's a couple others I found that deal with specific styles that I'm trying to learn (namely shredding on electric and fingerstyle tapping on acoustic)

1) The Guitar Of Preston Reed - I think I posted somewhere that I am also trying to learn solo fingerstyle guitar and this guy's ambidextrous tapping style intrigues me; he's like an acoustic Michael Batio :D On a side note, Andy Mckee (one of my acoustic heroes) is said to have learned from this. It's obvious though that this DVD is for those with some experience with fingerpicking already so if anybody can suggest where to begin, I'd greatly appreciate it.

2) Rusty Cooley Shred Manifesto - Rusty actually testifies to learning from Metal Method. He is a technique monster and has posted a lot on sites like Shredaholic.com. I wanna know if his DVD is as precise and clear as MM when it comes to shred guitar. If it's good, I might use it in conjunction with Rock Discipline.

3) Speed Kills 1&2 - Starring that ambidextrous freakshow M.A. Batio. Listening to his music, frankly, leaves me a bit cold but watching him play is quite inspiring to say the least. It looks like it might be good for developing technique and chops.

pfizer
07-08-2007, 02:10 PM
Hey guys! Long time, no-post :p Just wanted to keep this thread alive for other's use.

Well, I had some time on my hands and borrowed the Rockhouse Method DVDs from my friend, particularly the Learn To Play Rock, Advanced Metal and Hands of Steel courses. While they are pretty good compared to most of the other instructionals out there, they seem to be lacking in some areas, particularly, telling the watcher WHAT to practice. John McCarthy (the instructor) is good and is a solid guitarist but he basically just tells you to "play this, play that" with no further explanation.

Initial grade: B-

I also re-visited the Metal Method website (still really want that one) and saw a new Stage Six included in the Basic Course Package. Mandz, if it's no trouble, could you post a detailed review of the new Metal Method course? I'm also interested in the Metal Method: Guitar Songwriting course, anybody have any opinions on it?

I'm up for a gig in about 4 months time, my first gig in about 4 years :eek: . I really need your help and advice guys. My bandmates are pretty ambitious and we're actually aiming to do songs from Rage Against The Machine, Sum 41 and Trivium. I can do the RATM songs fine (Killing in the Name, Bombtrack) but I still need quite a bit of work. Sum 41's "Hell Song" is a bitch to play and Trivium is near impossible at my current level. Yikes, it's gonna be one hell of a gig either way!

Red Shoes
07-10-2007, 12:29 PM
I've just bought several DVDs - John Petrucci's Rock Discipline; Michael Angelo's Speed Kills 2 and Speed Lives; Paul Gilbert's Intense Rock 1 & 2 and Terrifying Guitar Trip; and Frank Gambale's Chop Builder. Loads to have a look at - I'll let you know what I think once I've had a go with each of them :)

forgottenking2
07-10-2007, 01:43 PM
I've watched all of those minus Speed Lives. I don't have the Chop Builder anymore the VHS tape just died on me. And while the same thing happen to the PG videos I got them back on DVD. That should tell you which I think are the better ones. Don't get me wrong. They all showed me different approaches to technique and useful exercises but really the PG videos are the most entertaining. Michael Angelo's video goes along the same lines plus he shows you a couple of sweep picking shapes (which are virtually unexistent in PG's videos) but he fails to keep my attention (I can't sit through a whole movie so it may not be his fault). The Frank Gambale's video is great I just never really cared for his approach, not that it's bad or anything (if you have heard him play you know it works for him) it's just not my cup of tea. Petrucci's video is very methodical and it really breaks things down plus he shows you how to use a metronome (which all the other videos fail to do) but John appears to be a VERY boring teacher in that video. He sounds like my high school literature teacher. The concepts are valuable though and very clearly executed. It's just boring to watch.

The bottom line is they are all good I just like the PG videos better.

Red Shoes
07-10-2007, 04:36 PM
Thanks very much for that, the Paul Gilbert ones and the John Petrucci one were the ones I'd been looking forward to the most. So hopefully I'll get a good balance. Michael Angelo seems to be a bit too much to take at times lol. Will try them and let you know what I think :)

pfizer
07-27-2007, 04:56 PM
Hey guys. Still trying to keep this thread alive, hope no one minds :)

Found a site : http://www.guitarprinciples.com/

Several people on the Ultimate-Guitar Forum recommended it and I was interested to see if anybody here has ever heard of it or better yet, has had experience with it as well as the products on the site.

Also, I heard some people saying that any site that links to or endorses Learn and Master Guitar earn a certain amount for their plugging. Considering how many "reviews" also link to the official website, I'm starting to have some doubts about the course, as forumites like ourselves seem to have very little experience with this reportedly "cream of the crop" of video guitar lessons. Some reviews still stand as there are still people (in this forum particularly) who give positive reviews for the course. I'm just wondering whether the validity of the "reviews" have any reflections on the actual quality of the course.

pfizer
08-05-2007, 09:45 AM
bump

raf7007
08-23-2007, 06:11 PM
hi i own that guitar about year,its mint condition,have just small chip on te edge of body,never gigged,paid for this beauty Ł980 im selling for ŁŁ850 or would swap for ESP eclipse or Gibson les paul

..(reason why im selling its cos i need something as les paul shape)

pfizer
11-20-2007, 10:17 AM
hi i own that guitar about year,its mint condition,have just small chip on te edge of body,never gigged,paid for this beauty Ł980 im selling for ŁŁ850 or would swap for ESP eclipse or Gibson les paul

..(reason why im selling its cos i need something as les paul shape)


Yeah, put this in a place for selling stuff, not here. This thread f****n died because of this :mad:

Anyway, here's something I need to get off my chest:

As some of you might know, I'm a bit of an instructional video junkie and because of that, I've come across a LOT of different instructionals and I'm wondering why some of them are so darned expensive! I mean, we're talking an average of $100-$300 with each product. They're usually the "complete" courses, promising complete virtuosity and knowledge. I, like any other bloke who plays guitar, am skeptical about the claims they make but I'd like to know what you think.

Here's the top 3 MOST EXPENSIVE GUITAR INSTRUCTIONAL VIDEOS I've found!

- Learn and Master Guitar by Steve Krenz

Oh yeah, when I first heard the price of this one (about $250), my jaw hit the floor. That price is no joke but I've heard very little about it except from websites "reviewing" it but ultimately being affiliated with the product (read: they get a cut from each product sold). It claims to be, in abbreviated terms, "most complete guitar course ever". I have seen some good reviews about it here in this and other forums but I'm still having trouble believing that price! If it's that well made and that complete, then why haven't more people heard about it?

- John McLaughlin's This Is The Way I Do It and Gateway to Rhythm
To his credit, this THE John McLaughlin we're talking about here, so it makes the price tag (about $200 as well) a we bit easier to swallow. I HAVE seen some good reviews about the product in boards (which I tend to trust more, especially if I know the poster isn't an employee of the course who registered to plug the product) but the general consensus seems to agree that this course is not for n00bs(like me ) . I might consider getting it when I'm good enough

- Absolutely Understand Guitar by Scotty West
Just heard about this one actually. It seems to be in the same vein as LaMG by Steve Krenz but with a bit less production values. Scotty West looks like he shot this in his basement! On the other hand though, production values matter less than the actual teaching ability of the instructor, especially through a one-way medium like videos. Paul Gilbert filmed almost all his instructionals on a bar stool in front of a green screen and John Petrucci just basically sat in the dark throughout his instructional but they were both able to get their points across well. If Scotty West is a good enough teacher, then his course can come in a plastic bag for all I care!


I'm thinking of purchasing the complete 2007 version of Metal Method series by Doug Marks and I want to know if I should get one of the above courses instead....

pfizer
02-03-2008, 12:16 PM
Hey guys, just an update to this thread...

I've been listening to quite a bit of Metallica/Slayer/Megadeth/Pantera lately and something really caught my ear about the rhythm sections of the songs. They have a gallop picking type pattern (a term I got from Matt Heafy) that sounds very much like a machine gun. I guess the best way I could describe it would be like a TRRD-TRRD-TRRD type rhythm. As I listened to more bands, I found that the newer metalcore acts such as Killswitch Engage and All That Remains use it as well.
Here's an example:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgswxjg67wM = Note the part by Trivium

It's quite different from the strict alternate picking that Paul Gilbert and John Petrucci use in their songs and teach in their videos. The notes seem like triplets but are more like sixteenth notes with three notes and a rest.

I'm hoping on adding this rhythmic technique to my practice regimen and I found a series of DVDs by Lick Library called Metal Edge taught by Andy James. I've been kinda apprehensive about getting the LL vids primarily because they don't use tab at all. Somebody likened the vids to learning riffs from another guitarist so I'm giving it a chance, provided of course that they are any good. Here's a clip:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zd_NRWwE6v8

Besides LL, I've also found a new series by Rockhouse Method , called the Metal Guitar series. I'm not counting the Advanced Metal Licks DVDs here since I've already seen them and they kinda suck to be honest http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/freak.gif The whole DVD is just basically "here's riff 1, riff 1 slow, here's riff 2, riff 2 slow, etc." without really explaining much.

Like I said, I'm interested in the Metal Guitar DVDs, from Beginner to Advanced. The first one's taught by RH instructor and founder John McCarthy, while the second and third DVDs are taught by Marc Rizzo (of Soulfly). The latest DVD they have is on Writing, Riffing and Soloing taught by Rob Arnold of Chimaira (whose albums were nothing remarkable, but did display Arnold's skills as a lead guitarist).

Also I discovered something extremely important about my playing. I just recently picked up my electric guitar again after I got the tuning keys and bridge fixed. I played and I sounded like crap. Specifically, everything I played rang like a friggin' bell!

For those who don't know, I practice almost exclusively on acoustic since it's my only working guitar right now. I also though that it would build finger strength and that it would be the same as playing clean on electric. Damn, I was wrong! Every mistake, every bit of sloppyness is amplified on electric! I can play the palm-muted chord progressions fine but my lead lines sound like SUCK http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/images/smilies/frown.gif I now realize that I am getting WAAYYY ahead of myself in wanting to learn tapping and shredding when I can't even flippin' mute the strings I don't want to play properly.

Someone recommended Ritchie Kotzen's Rock Chops to help me get a grip on muting strings and getting a cleaner, less sloppy sound. Do the Gilbert/Petrucci/Gambale vids teach this as well? Is the Kotzen vid any good?


This is where you guys come in http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/thumb.gif Pleaseeeeeee???!!!

oRg
02-04-2008, 05:52 PM
Hey pfizer,

Yeah, the technique your talking about is more along the lines of 3 sixteenth notes with a sixteenth note rest. It's extremely prevalent in hardcore music (i.e. Hatebreed, Agnostic Front, etc etc), and it's also pretty beneficial in death metal. However I'm pretty sure it's not called the galloping technique. I believe a good example of the galloping technique is in Metallica's "The Four Horsemen" from Kill'Em All.

One of the cool things about the 3 16ths/16th rest is that keeping that kind of ratio going on you can get some nice syncopation going. This of playing them as 8th note triplets with an 8th note triplet rest. For example:


e|------------------------|
B|------------------------|
G|------------------------|
D|------------------------|
A|------------------------|
E|0-0-0---0-0-0---0-0-0---|
__\- 3-/\- 3-/\- 3-/\- 3-/

With a 4/4 quarter note hi-hat/snare beat...this sounds pretty neat. Just an idea to think about. ;)

See attached powertab for a more clear example.

Obivion
02-05-2008, 03:18 PM
I think what you're talking about is the Iron Maiden sorta gallop rhythm. Just listen to Maiden and you'll pick up the rhythm.

As to your muting question, you need to turn the distortion down and mute lightly on the bridge. And seeing as you like Matt Heafy from Trivium, the bloke swears by Petrucci's "Rock Discipline" as his fav instructional workout, so you might wanna look into that.

Crossroads
02-05-2008, 06:59 PM
As far as I recall - pretty sure the Gilbert DVD has nothing about muting, & nor do the two Batio DVD’s (nor Shawn Lane's video). I didn’t like the Peturucci video much, and only looked briefly at it, though I think he does have some advice on muting.

Somewhere here there’s a long thread about muting (from EricV I think), so probably worth a search on that.

I don’t really find I need to mute much unless playing ultra fast licks at high volume with high output active pups. Even then I found one cause of the unwanted noise was when my picking and fretting were not so accurate and clean…the better my fast picking got, the less I needed to mute anyway. Other thing - I found muting with the right hand deadened the notes too much…although I found it harder, I prefer to try muting with the fretting hand/fingers if I can.

Just my 2:cents on all that.

Ian.

UKRuss
02-06-2008, 02:37 PM
You should consider starting a DVD library Ian. there cannot be many Doovde's you do not now own.

ps. The hire charge on mine is now accumulating interest at store card style rates.

Crossroads
02-06-2008, 03:24 PM
Ha, ha ... OK, understood :) .

Ian.

Wintermute
06-02-2008, 12:09 PM
Anything by malmsteem is going to be like:

See my unt guitar playing, im so fat.

e.t.c

uncleslinky
01-10-2009, 02:30 PM
Although I've never used a huge amount of instructional videos, I've got to agree with many posts before and say anything by Paul Gilbert. He makes everything so enjoyable and easy to follow which is great for keeping you interested. Of course it depends what you're looking for, but for anything to do with speed picking and alternate pick I'd recommend the Intesnse Rock videos by Paul Gilbert.

pfizer
01-17-2009, 05:49 AM
Hey guys, been a while since I've posted here :) I've finally graduated from Nursing school and passed the board exam so you'd think I'd be able to play guitar full time right? Well, no. I'm in med school now, which barely gives me time to sleep, much less shred. Over the last year, I've all but quit playing guitar and I'm trying to get back on the saddle.

Over summer vacation, I'm planning on working through the entire Metal Method course, from Stage 1 to 6. Also, I'm going to try and find my Rock Discipline and Intense Rock copies.

That said, I've also found a resource here in the Philippines for Lick Library DVDs and after taking a look at his list, I've narrowed down the few I'm considering:

Ultimate Guitar Techniques: Shredding Classical - Caprice No.5 (Andy James) 1 DVD
Ultimate Guitar Techniques: Shredding Classical - Caprice No.24 (Danny Gill) 1 DVD
Metal Edge: Metal Soloing/Pentatonic/Tapping (Andy James) 3 DVDs
Essential Guitar Pure Theory: Harmony & Theory Basics-Advanced (Danny Gill) 3 DVDs
Essential Guitar Practice Routines: Alternate Picking (Danny Gill) 1 DVD
Fretboard Fitness Workout: Guitar Aerobics Basics-Advanced (Danny Gill) 2 DVDs
50 Metal Killer Licks (Danny Gill) 1 DVD

I just need some opinions from anybody who has used them or had experience with them (coughcoughMandzandCrossroadscoughcough) since I only have money for four or five DVDs at a time.

Metal Method also released a new series called Metal Riffology which teaches "the art of the metal riff". It's taught by Sarah Spisak, one of the teachers in Metal Method, along with Doug Marks and MAB. I believed they already released this course a few years back as a CD-ROM but they revamped it as a DVD. Some people at the MM boards refer to it as a sort of "Stage 7", a bridge between the basic course and MAB's wank-fest Speed series.

They have some previews for the LL vids I mentioned here:
http://www.youtube.com/user/licklibrary?blend=1

And a preview of Metal Riffology as well:
http://www.youtube.com/user/SarahSpisak

metaljustice83
02-23-2009, 03:42 PM
Can we sticky this thread? alot of good info here.

pauls
04-05-2009, 12:01 AM
Glad I stumbled onto this forum! I've been looking for instructional videos since I got a guitar for Christmas. Love the details in this thread, thank you.

Batigoal
04-17-2009, 12:06 PM
deleted by admin

lemarquis
05-31-2009, 05:41 AM
There are tons of them. You need to narrow your choices by figuring out what your goals are. Do you want a general beginner's intro to playing guitar or are you looking to learn a certain style?

dorfmeister
06-29-2009, 12:39 AM
Any new thoughts here.

polmartin33
08-01-2009, 07:36 AM
i notice some of the guitar instructional videos that your discussing are for advance guitarist dont you have anything for the beginners? so far i check justinguitar.com i got it from youtube and he also has a website you may wanna make some reviews about this person i was able to grab some of his youtube videos if only i have a credit card and paypal i get the dvd for $70 dollars.

Crossroads
08-01-2009, 08:17 AM
i notice some of the guitar instructional videos that your discussing are for advance guitarist dont you have anything for the beginners? so far i check justinguitar.com i got it from youtube and he also has a website you may wanna make some reviews about this person i was able to grab some of his youtube videos if only i have a credit card and paypal i get the dvd for $70 dollars.
Is Justinguitar.com an Internet teaching product from an individual teacher? Because there are hundreds of individual commercial ventures like that.

It's always possible that some of those things are really good. But in most cases I suspect they will be clearly inferior to the best of the mainstream teaching material in the books and DVD's listed throughout this thread.

It's a free choice & people can spend their hard earned money any way they want. But for anyone just beginning electric lead guitar, the first DVD from Danny Gill (Rock Essentials) is excellent, and about half the price you mention. And there is also an excellent & very comprehensive book/CD from Barrett Tagliarino (Chord Tone Soloing) which is only a quarter of that price.

For a simple tutorial play-along guide, I'd also recommend the book/CD from Ricky Rooksby (Fast Forward Lead Guitar), again a fraction of the price.

Ian.

lufc71
08-06-2009, 12:54 PM
I've got several instructional DVD's and my favourite is probably Keith Wyatt's Rockin The Blues. If you like blues jamming, this is the DVD for you! Loads of rythym and lead ideas and techniques. :)

Lenovo
08-10-2009, 12:54 AM
Thanks man it makes more sense now and I think I can get closer to what I 'm looking for.:D

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uday1583
08-11-2009, 04:42 PM
Hey this is a nice thread... i am a starter actually... just started learning playing guitar... could someone help me with some tips. Thanks

pfizer
08-11-2009, 05:18 PM
Wow, we really have to get this thread stickied ;P

Anyways, just a quick review on two new DVDs I've tried out;

Guitar World's Beginning Hard Rock and Heavy Metal
- Pretty darned good with nice and clear instruction from Andy Aledort. The riffs sound very cool and are a lot of fun to play. This is a good supplement to anyone learning basic theory to keep them motivated, while learning how to apply the theory they just learned on some pretty badass riffs (rock and metal, in this case).
- Rating: 4/5

Metal Riffology
- Pretty much exactly the same as the previous DVD but focuses more on riffing than soloing. Onscreen tab is a huge plus. Sarah Spisak is a great instructor as well and really knows what she's doing. The riffs sound great too, although they can be a tiny bit cheesy at times. The amount of bad-*** riffs outweigh the cheese though, and that's just mostly subjective anyway.
-Rating: 4.5/5

pfizer
08-23-2009, 02:54 PM
Hey guys! Haven't posted anything here in a long time. Even though this thread has been stickied, I don't wanna be a thread necro, so here's some new reviews for a couple of DVDs I have:

Lick Library Harmony and Theory Basics
- This DVD is from the folks over at LL, so yep, no tabs. Luckily, the instructor is Danny Gill and he is excellent at teaching. Most everything is explained note for note - if you're up to it, you can probably tab out the stuff he teaches yourself. As for the course itself, it's not that bad - the stuff is explained quite clearly and Danny always makes sure to refer back to previous chapters, just to make sure the material is drilled through. The jam tracks are included on the disc as usual and they're actually a lot of fun. As good as this DVD is starting to sound though, I have one notable gripe about it and that is the why the scales and keys are taught. In the DVD, the C major scale is taught, again note for note but only in one position. There nothing wrong with that, but the example that follows has Danny pretty much playing all over the fretboard! To be fair, he does advice the viewer to learn all the notes on the fretboard at the very beginning, so if technically, the student was to have memorized the entire fretboard before moving on, he would know that Danny was playing notes from only the C major scale in the example. This doesn't, however, escape the issue of fingerings, so again, it would've been nice if he had taught how to play the C major scale from all positions first, since the example that follows is played from many different positions.
- Rating: 3/5

Homespun Learn to Play Jim Croce with Pete Huttlinger
- An excellent course in my opinion, and I haven't even heard of Jim Croce before trying this one. Pete Huttlinger is a great instructor and makes sure to break everything down in easy to digest bits. He also offers tips on how to properly nail the parts, instead of just playing slow without any explanation on how to play it full speed. The reason I like this course is because it pretty much serves as a chop-building course for fingerstyle, as well as a 'learn to play (insert artist)' course. Picture-in-picture video is a tremendous help, especially in fingerstyle since the right hand patterns are often more complicated than the left hand. Tab is also included, which is a huge plus.
- Rating: 5/5

Metal Edge Metal Rhythm Techniques
- As far as technique goes, Andy James is incredible. The guy is a shred-monster and even in this DVD which focuses entirely on rhythm, his playing is noticeably razor-sharp. The instruction is again, presented clearly in a note-for-note basis and the jam tracks are helpful. The only problem I have is that Andy doesn't really offer any tips on how to nail a particular technique. He does show what he does slowly and offers some advice, but it might not be enough to really nail a technique. If nothing else, the songs (from Beginner to Advanced) serve as really good practice material since they isolate a particular technique taught in the DVD, plus they sound damned awesome to boot. Seeing as how there really aren't very many DVDs out there that focus on modern metal rhythm guitar, this is one of the best out there.
- Rating: 4/5

Guitar World Blues Rock Masterclass
- Andy Aledort is a good teacher but his laidback style of delivery might be a tad boring for some students. The material in the DVD itself is pretty complete but since this is a 'master class', some materials tend to get glossed over. Also, Andy moves quite fast so printing the PDF tab before starting the DVD is highly recommended.
- Rating: 3.5/5

lufc71
08-24-2009, 07:06 AM
+1 on anything that Danny Gill does. I've got several of his and they are all excellent :)

Somebody mentioned earlier Stuart Bull. Let me first say that I think he is a very good player. But...(you just knew there was a 'but' coming didn't you?? ;)) I have two by him called Ultimate Blues (2 & 3 I think, which have have pics of BB King and SRV on the front) which are anything but the blues! :(. The problem is this: Stu is a rock player. If you want to sound like BB or SRV do not buy these. I wouldn't even call them blues/rock. They are just rock riffs/phrasing/techniques/tone over a blues progression.

For blues, as I said earlier, I'd recommend Keith Wyatt, or a real good one I got years ago by Robben Ford called Playin The Blues (I think).

pfizer
08-24-2009, 10:47 AM
I'm interested as well on Keith Wyatt DVDs. I saw one title called Fender Presents Getting Started On Electric Guitar and it's got some good reviews on Amazon; I think it's been mentioned on this forum a couple of times as well...

As for Stuart Bull, he is an excellent player but a so-so teacher. His DVD, Chords and The Scales That Fit Them is pretty comprehensive but the info is sort of all over the place. I still might take a look at it when I get more experience, since there is a ton of info in that title. I'm still trying to get a hold of Danny Gill's Rock Essentials, Rock Concepts, and Advanced Rock Guitar which I hear basically teaches the same stuff, albeit in a much more systematic manner.

Here's another review:

Silence Followed By A Deafening Roar by Paul Gilbert
- As you would expect, Paul is a very engaging and humorous teacher - not only does he show you how to play the songs from his album (which is about 90% percent of the DVD) but always offers tips and tricks on how to nail them (e.g. timing the downstroke of the pick to a change in position). The other part of the DVD is the 'Shred Annex' and is packed full of shred licks for everyday use. Comes with PDF tab and backing tracks, so if you want to try and play along with him you can. The downside is the DVD is fairly advanced and a bit less informative than his Intense Rock series. Still, it's Paul Gilbert....
- Rating: 4/5 (just because Paul Gilbert is awesome...if you disagree, drop it down to a 3.5)

Raven
09-07-2009, 09:52 PM
Videos are cool, but i reckon its far better to try and work out songs by ear. That way your not only perfecting your chops but your training your most important tool, your ear! But ive seen one good vid that really helped me, its an allan holdsworth instructional vid. Not too sure what it was called, but its interesting, and its really got alot of helpful info

metaljustice83
09-08-2009, 02:48 AM
Raven, You are right. but different strokes for different folks.

Crossroads
09-08-2009, 07:59 AM
Videos are cool, but i reckon its far better to try and work out songs by ear. That way your not only perfecting your chops but your training your most important tool, your ear! But ive seen one good vid that really helped me, its an allan holdsworth instructional vid. Not too sure what it was called, but its interesting, and its really got alot of helpful info

Well nobody actually buys "video tapes" any more. Video is far too slow to be really useable as a self-teaching medium. DVD is vastly superior. And printed books are also still invaluable (especially with full demo. CD's).

Way back in the 1960's and earlier, when guys like Clapton and Hendrix first learned to play, there were no instructional videos or DVD's. In fact there weren't even any relevant books on how to play contemporary guitar.

Those guys and their predecessors (Bill Broonzy, Charlie Christian, etc.) had no other option except either copying from vinyl records, or far more relevant they learnt from one-another by playing together ... they passed on ideas and licks directly to one-another.

But to reject modern teaching material now, in 2009, is sheer lunacy imho. And I doubt if any of those old established players would have rejected books and tutorial DVD's if they were starting out today ... modern DVD's provide a structured and carefully considered way of directly passing on the ideas and phrases in the same way that guys like Christian and Broonzy did when they originally learned to play from one-another.

Of course it's true as Matt says "different strokes for different folks" - different guys will find different methods useful, and there may be some who really do find it best to try copying by ear from old records. But generally speaking, for 99% of players - if guys can't learn from teachers like Scott Henderson, Don Mock and Paul Gilbert on their best tutorial DVD's and books, then there is something seriously wrong with the student (not the teacher).

Lastly - although I like Allan Holdsworth as a player, he is not good as a teacher, and he put very little effort into making what is frankly one of the worst and least useful instructional videos I've seen (it's an old video, recently re cut on DVD). I'm sure he could have done 100% better, if he actually tried. But if guys like that sort jazzy fusion playing, then the Scott Henderson DVD covers essentially the same material brilliantly & in depth.

2:cents ... and the advice is purely intended to help people :cool: .

Ian.

pfizer
12-18-2009, 06:09 PM
Hey guys, long time no post :-)

Since the holiday season is coming up, I've decided to post about a different type of guitar instructional DVD - the independently produced and released ones.

Well known companies such as Rockhouse or Lick Library have a staff and probably a substantial budget, to be able to produce the number of DVDs that they release each year; Rockhouse, in particular, since they have quite a few big name guitarists appearing on their products.

I've noticed though that while both companies do produce some very good, quality DVDs, there is a whole bunch of crap materials that come with it --maybe about 5 bad titles for every 1 good title. Another problem is that the DVDs usually focus on one very specific area or genre of playing, so they end up feeling a bit lacking in the end.

On to my point -- I've researched a few online guitar instructors that release their own guitar DVDs, in addition to the lessons they already have for free in their respective websites and from what I can tell, they really do put a lot of effort and genuine love into their materials, maybe much more than the average Rockhouse or Hot Licks video (again, I'm not knocking anything, just pointing out the facts). They are a lot more forthcoming about who their DVDs are suited for and they readily answer questions from their customers -- I personally find them easier to trust because its usually just the instructor himself who is the brains behind the whole thing (you think I can ask Alexi Laiho WTF he was talking about on his instructional video? He sounded like he was f*****g wasted the entire time!). Finally, since the DVDs they produce are fairly few and far between, each product is quite comprehensive and complete, so as not to have the customers filling up their inboxes with questions about the DVD.

So, this Christmas, I'm biting the bullet and have decided to try out an independently released course for myself. I've narrowed my search down to 4 different course and I'd appreciate your advice and opinions.

Justin Sandercoe (justinguitar.com)
- famous Youtube instructor; I'm quite impressed with his teaching style and also the free stuff he's already released. He's a pretty damned good player as well. He's clear and concise without being boring and is damned generous with the charts and the tabs.
Anthony Stauffer (steviesnacks.com)
- if there was a Texas blues equivalent to Metal Method, this would be it. Anthony Stauffer nails SRV's playing style and has it down to a science -- he's generous with the tbas as well and even has some nice onscreen graphics. He basically teaches one style of playing, but teaches it very well.
Griff Hamlin (Blues Guitar Unleashed)
- saw some glowing reviews about his course on a Fender forum but not much else.
Marty Schwartz (guitarjamz.com)
- a pretty good teacher as well and he kinda looks like David Zayas' character Angel Batista from "Dexter" :p

They each have some DVD packages for sale which all cost in the range of 100-200 dollars, so yeah, this is quite a serious purchase for me...

wadester
03-13-2010, 10:06 PM
I've never actually bought any guitar videos (well except for Legends of Jazz but that's a performance DVD) but my friend let me borrow Joe Pass Solo Jazz Guitar although I had only been playing (if you could call it that) jazz for about 2 months so it was only good for blowing my mind.

I do plan to come back to it in a few months though now that I'm not so green :P That same tape had a bunch of Star Licks on it (some shred crap etc.) the only other one I liked was Larry Carleton's but his wasn't particularly useful to me either (again, could have been my lack of experience).

I'm kinda of interested in suggestions. I have noticed that the quality of Hot Licks videos seems to be pretty consistent and I'd say any of them is probably safe. What type of music do you like?

EDIT: Wait! I lied; I forgot I bought that Joe Stump Shred video from Berklee and it was horrible! Don't buy Chop Builder or whatever from Berklee, the only 2 good clips from it they put on the web for free at http://www.berkleeshares.com

-Dan Arlen Roth!Great teacher in most styles.most underrated player out there.check him on utube.best original sounding player out there in my books...

fingerpikingood
03-25-2010, 02:40 PM
i recommend if a person would like to learn guitar...he should first listen to intense Rock music daily..or if he is techno freak....listen techno mix music.
that's it? guitar is only rock or techno? i gotta admit, i'm not much of a fan of rock. i like some music that is classified as rock, but that's about it. techno i only really like if you put bongos under my hands, or keys too with cool sounds. and i play alot of guitar.

metaljustice83
03-25-2010, 06:12 PM
its spam dude. He's going bye bye now.

Aouragh
05-18-2010, 10:11 PM
There are some very useful tips on here especially for the guitar. I just started playing guitar, like 3 weeks ago and I am really enjoying it. I try to play 1 hour of guitar per day and try to learn from YouTube videos. I am also going to take lessons to make sure I become a good guitar player!

safira218
02-25-2011, 05:15 AM
I've never actually bought any guitar videos (well except for Legends of Jazz but that's a performance DVD) but my friend let me borrow Joe Pass Solo Jazz Guitar although I had only been playing (if you could call it that) jazz for about 2 months so it was only good for blowing my mind.

I do plan to come back to it in a few months though now that I'm not so green :P That same tape had a bunch of Star Licks on it (some shred crap etc.) the only other one I liked was Larry Carleton's but his wasn't particularly useful to me either (again, could have been my lack of experience).

I'm kinda of interested in suggestions. I have noticed that the quality of Hot Licks videos seems to be pretty consistent and I'd say any of them is probably safe. What type of music do you like?

EDIT: Wait! I lied; I forgot I bought that Joe Stump Shred video from Berklee and it was horrible! Don't buy Chop Builder or whatever from Berklee, the only 2 good clips from it they put on the web for free at http://www.berkleeshares.com

-Dan
However, I made the same mistake as DanF, and bought Chop buider by Joe Stump. It's a pieca of crap, and there is very little useful information there. The way it was advertised, was very misleading.

susiehaynes
03-27-2011, 04:01 AM
awesome!

hello everyone!

It's me Susan. i am new here. and i am enjoying. i hope to enjoy more. and to learn something new. i am also willing to share the skills that i have known.

more power! :) (http://breastenlargementpittsburgh.com/blog-pittsburgh-pa)

Bill Brown
03-28-2011, 06:41 PM
Hehe. Hey Susan!

I've been registered for a while, but have been inactive due to been poorly. So, I'm kinda new.

Some great suggestions in this thread. I'll be surely checking them out.

diesel
06-24-2011, 07:18 PM
I would highly recommend Justin Sandercoe. His lessons for a beginner to intermediate guitar player are clear and concise. He explains the hows and whys and from a beginners perspective that is extremely helpful. He has a beginners course as well as an intermediate course. The tabs to his songs were deleted for obvious reasons but if you watch carefully and listen they are very achievable.

Kurt Mitchell's rock cd's are total garbage. You have to write out the tab as he calls it out on the CD.What an absolute waste of money!!!:mad:

caroline953
10-03-2011, 11:33 AM
I have watched many instructional videos on playing guitar at youtube and myspace but these are for beginner and updated by unprofessionals guitar players. Therefore, it is better for you to join any professional website that provide you propert guitar training.

marcthomesh
12-13-2011, 05:22 PM
Rock behavior is actually really good, it covers a lot of concepts in a dynamic scene and you will (I still use some of their approaches to practicing) in order to see the downside of the video can be acutely arid Petrucci Paul Gilbert videos add a lot of fun (even conceded pizza is not as clear definitions of "eternal" both videos are abundant and they both helped nous mind, Kui You, you can get them both and plan for the PG.

ramprakav
01-18-2012, 02:34 AM
Hello everybody I am also join with yours
I am happy to say this

Thanks

Gman
03-24-2014, 03:44 PM
I love this video on Frank Gambale's picking technique, it has served me well over the years.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJRZE6M_Y-M

buysclikes
04-24-2017, 06:48 AM
I took help from both books as well as guitar video. Both has unique place while you learning guitar.

Apolloe
09-22-2018, 11:44 AM
I'm not big on videos but I absolutely love Rusty Cooley instructional CD's. I have all 3 and they are all great.
Really ? Do you have rusty cooley instructional CD's. if yes then will you like to share them here I also wanna to watch them and play the guitar. Thanks

Stuart
12-29-2018, 09:25 PM
I never got into recordings, chiefly in light of the fact that here in Canada they are 2 or multiple times more costly than a similar book with a CD.