PDA

View Full Version : Starter Chord Progression Practice



Bongo Boy
08-15-2002, 06:11 AM
I've now been with the guitar for about 3 months. I have about 1 hour to spend with it each evening, and I've been practicing the same 4 or 5 chords during this time--as well as moving between them. I also have spent quite a bit of time getting to the point where I can move around on C major at a few places on the fretboard without looking at anything.

Progress is slow, although my simple open chords are beginning to sound quite clean, finally (I have short, fat bratwurst fingers). I still can't move between most of these chords without stumbling--no matter how slow the tempo. This is mostly because I've spent very little time practicing this particular skill.

Question: even though I know I have to work on these particular progressions, is there any harm in also practicing a variety of other chords during the same practice sessions? I'm getting a little bored and frustrated--but I prepared myself for that before I bought the guitar. I've just not seen any recommended daily regimen for beginners--the beginner books are basically all the same.

Recommendations?

szulc
08-15-2002, 12:30 PM
Here is the link to a post I submitted a few months ago to help with chords.

http://www.ibreathemusic.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&postid=792#post792


Learn the logic of how chord forms work on the fretboard.
Use your understanding of the tuning of the strings to move chords from string group to string group. For instance a chord on the EAD string group ca be played on the ADG string group by just moving it down 5 frets or up 7 frets( 12 -5) remember that down a fourth (-5) = up a fifth (+7). You have to look out for the 'Warp factor' at the GB string boundry. So a pattern on the ADG group moved to DGB moves down 5 or up 7 except you have to adjust for the fact taht the B string is tuned 1/2 step lower so the note that moves to B needs to be raised an additional fret (down 4 or up 8) . Patterns that move from DGB to GBE move down 5 or up 7 except the note that shifts from G to B which again moves down 4 or up 8. Remember also that you can open up chord forms on the EAD or GBE string groups by exchanging the E string ( at the same fret , of coarse).

There is a lot of mileage to be gained by applying the above method to everything you play (not just chords). The process will improve your understanding of how the guitar actually works.

Danster
08-15-2002, 09:20 PM
Originally posted by Bongo Boy
I've now been with the guitar for about 3 months.

Hey, I'll be happy to share the wealth of knowledge I've gained in my 14 months of playing. :D



Question: even though I know I have to work on these particular progressions, is there any harm in also practicing a variety of other chords during the same practice sessions? I'm getting a little bored and frustrated--but I prepared myself for that before I bought the guitar.

Dang, man. You are to be commended for sticking with your same ol' chord progressions that long. It was only about 2 months or so ago that for the first time I started experiencing a little boredom and frustration. I think it too was from mostly doing the same ol' stuff over and over again. My thinking was, if the thing you're working on is not perfect, you gotta keep doing it until it is. I think it helps me to leave that thing for a while, and work on something else. I have sometimes found that that imperfect thing got better while I was "away". These days I try to keep a balance in my practicing. I tried very structured practicing for a while but I tired of that quickly. I spend some practice sessions just noodling and practicing songs. I spend most sessions doing some noodling, some exercises, some practicing songs, and sometimes learning new songs or licks. Anyhoo, I have to change fairly regularly what I do in practicing, to avoid getting stale. I did tape myself during a whole practice session a few weeks ago. Man was that a humbling experience listening to that. But my hope is that when I tape future practice sessions, I will compare it to the old and be able to see some progress. 'Nuff rambling. Good luck!

Bongo Boy
08-16-2002, 02:18 AM
Originally posted by szulc
Learn the logic of how chord forms work on the fretboard.
Use your understanding of the tuning of the strings to move chords from string group to string group

As always, thanks for the patience. I will make it so! When you say this, are you referring to the actual patterns on the fretboard? Also, I've not heard the term 'string group' before--what's that--any set of adjacent strings needed to voice a particular chord?

szulc
08-16-2002, 12:31 PM
Any group of strings, not necessarily adjacent. In my example the happen to be adjacent.

This seems like I was resticting the discussion to Chord forms but Forms in general and on ANY grouping( or SET) of strings.
The important thing is learning to use the tuning to help you transpose on to other string groups ( Sets).


This really should have said:Learn the logic of how forms work on the fretboard.
Use your understanding of the tuning of the strings to move chords from string group to string group

Bongo Boy
08-30-2002, 04:41 AM
This is so frustrating...you could have shown me what you meant in 15 seconds and I probably would have understood. After reading and re-reading, then coming back and re-reading again, I think I know exactly what you're talking about.

You've just proven to me that my idea of "not having enough time" for lessons is bull****. I'd be learning far faster and with less time than is spent trying to communicate via text. Jeez...this is like trying to tell someone how to defuse a bomb by way of parcel post--you probably won't live long enough to solve the problem.

Now it's just a matter of finding the will.