PDA

View Full Version : Blue Bossa



jwilliams
12-16-2009, 12:36 AM
Well, my Jazz Ensemble concert was on December 10, 2009, and I must say, it went very well. I was in a small group, seperate from the big band, and we played two songs: Blue Bossa and So What.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-LDzke2u89I

I am the guitarist to the left, doing the melody and first solo. Anyone got any pointers that could improve my soloing? I'm somewhat satisfied with it, but I know I can do better. I'm hesitant to put So What on youtube..there was some confusion as to the solo order, the pianist took two choruses..I had to interrupt him to get mine in in the beginning of the 3rd chorus. But yes, this is my first real concert I've played guitar in, just looking for some comments and feedback. Thanks!:D

mjo
12-16-2009, 07:30 PM
You sound right on track for begining jazz, nice work.
Some things that might help you are:
1) practice more with chord tones/arpeggios. Your solo sounded fairly scaler, with the exception of a few places where you resolved to chord tones, (probably on strong beats), whether that was intentional or by accident, it sounded good. ;)
2) forget the mistakes as soon as you make them,....easier said than done, I know. The point is to keep playing with confidence, play those notes like you mean them. Experience helps a lot with this one.

Keep at it !
-Mike

jwilliams
12-16-2009, 11:21 PM
Thanks for the advice mjo-
I've heard people talking about playing with chord tones more, but I don't really get the whole concept of it. From what I understand, playing more with chord tones would be say, over a G chord, focusing on B D and perhaps F#?:confused:

mjo
12-17-2009, 08:11 PM
Think: Root, 3, 5, 7, as the chord you're playing over may be major, minor, or dominant. The idea is to resolve your phrases on a chord tone, (the 7th is not always the best option for this, esp on a major7 chord).
You can also practice soloing using only chord tones, 7th included. This should force you to play fairly sparsely and you'll really get to hear how those notes sound at various points in the rhythm / meter.

-best,
Mike