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Philcwm
04-08-2009, 10:24 AM
I am trying to learn "Break on Through" by the doors and I'm having trouble with hand independence.

I've learned hands seperate, but I'm curious as to how you all proceed from there. In the past I've used the score to synchronize notes against the pulse i.e. playing each note as its vertically lined up on the score.
Is this the best method or should I learn how to follow the pulse independently with each hand.

Malcolm
04-08-2009, 12:16 PM
As I'm self taught I do not know which would be best for you. Can only state how I do it. Understand I play from lead sheet music - which does not have a bass cliff - so that in itself is eliminating one of the problems. Should mention I've been with the keyboard just over a year.

Getting my left hand and right working independent is still a problem when playing melody notes with the right hand and chords with the left. To help I hi-light the melody note I'm to start the chord on - seems to help. Having better success playing chord accompaniment patterns - using both hands - and relying upon my voice for the melody notes, i.e. I'm "strumming" my keyboard. If I'm using one of my ole stand-by patterns it's not a big problem, however if I'm using a new pattern I have to work at it.

It is getting better so I guess it's like everything else - practice does work.

Can find tabs on Break on through, however only found this fake chord
http://www.megachords.com/piano/music/104309/break-on-through.htm
Do not know the song's tune, but, I think a 4/4 pattern of:
Left hand R - 5 then right hand block chord then left hand repeat of the 5 gives a good 1, 2, 3, 4, beat. One per measure then for the second measure using the same chord use a 3-5 then a block chord with the right then end with the repeated 5 on the left hand. If the measure has two chords I normally revert to R left hand then block chord right hand for a 1, 2 beat then do the same with the new chord for the 3, 4 beat.

See what you think. Course that's chord accompaniment the melody comes from your or the vocalist's voice.

Good luck.