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Terratrum
06-23-2008, 05:28 PM
i'm sort of confused when at the beggining of the staff there is 1 or more flat or sharp signs.

Since that sounds very vague I decided to put a pic of an example:

<a href=http://s96.photobucket.com/albums/l167/Tom_hixs/?action=view&current=scorehlp.jpg>


http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l167/Tom_hixs/scorehlp.jpg


(Wasn't sure if it was HTML or IMG code)

If anyone could help with this probably obvious answer, I'd be pleased.

Malcolm
06-24-2008, 12:05 AM
Short answer - you count the number of sharps (#) or flats (b) and that tells you what key/scale the piece is to be played in.

The following is how you make since from all that.

C Scale has no sharps or flats
G Scale has 1 sharp
D scale has 2 sharps
A scale has 3 sharps
etc. etc. etc.
F scale has 1 flat
Bb scale has 2 flats
Eb scale has 3 flats
etc. etc. etc.

So if you use this mesmeric and just match it to the number of sharps # or flats b on the piece of sheet music and that will tell you the scale or key.

Order of the scales with sharps.
See God destroy all earth by F#iry C#haos
C has 0 sharps
G has 1
D has 2 ----- you get the picture.

Now the mesmeric for flats:
Farmer Brown eats apple dumplings greasley cooked.
F has one flat
Bb has two, etc.

Now as to what sharp.
Fat cats go down alleys eating birds.
C scale has zero sharps.
G scale has one the F# for fat.
D scale has two - keeps the F# and adds the C# for cats.
A scale has three - keeps the F# and C# and adds the G# for go.
etc. etc.

For the flats. Their order is just a repeat of Farmer Brown eats apple dumplings greasley cooked.

Recapping; Use your mesmerics and tick off the number of sharps and flats shown on the music. Six flats tells you the key is Gb, and 4 sharps will be E.

Another way of doing this is to use the above number of sharps and flats to tell you what scale you are to use and then look where the sharps or flats fall on the staff for the specific notes that are to be sharped or flatted.

I think ticking off Fat cats go down alleys eating birds is quicker. Use which ever one you like best.

Terratrum
06-24-2008, 01:18 AM
Short answer - you count the number of sharps (#) or flats (b) and that tells you what key/scale the piece is to be played in.

The following is how you make since from all that.

C Scale has no sharps or flats
G Scale has 1 sharp
D scale has 2 sharps
A scale has 3 sharps
etc. etc. etc.
F scale has 1 flat
Bb scale has 2 flats
Eb scale has 3 flats
etc. etc. etc.

So if you use this mesmeric and just match it to the number of sharps # or flats b on the piece of sheet music and that will tell you the scale or key.

Order of the scales with sharps.
See God destroy all earth by F#iry C#haos
C has 0 sharps
G has 1
D has 2 ----- you get the picture.

Now the mesmeric for flats:
Farmer Brown eats apple dumplings greasley cooked.
F has one flat
Bb has two, etc.

Now as to what sharp.
Fat cats go down alleys eating birds.
C scale has zero sharps.
G scale has one the F# for fat.
D scale has two - keeps the F# and adds the C# for cats.
A scale has three - keeps the F# and C# and adds the G# for go.
etc. etc.

For the flats. Their order is just a repeat of Farmer Brown eats apple dumplings greasley cooked.

Recapping; Use your mesmerics and tick off the number of sharps and flats shown on the music. Six flats tells you the key is Gb, and 4 sharps will be E.

Another way of doing this is to use the above number of sharps and flats to tell you what scale you are to use and then look where the sharps or flats fall on the staff for the specific notes that are to be sharped or flatted.

I think ticking off Fat cats go down alleys eating birds is quicker. Use which ever one you like best.

I'm sorry, I am very confused by this explanation. How do those sharp symbols in the beggining effect the music and how do you read them. My question was and still is broad, I know. If there is any thing else to recomend for me so you don't have to kill your self trying to explain something probably very obvious, please do. Thank you for trying to help me though :)

Jed
06-24-2008, 01:27 AM
What's the question ?

You said you are confused but you never asked a question . . .

Now I'm confused :confused:

Terratrum
06-24-2008, 01:29 AM
The true question, what do the symbols in the beggining of a staff mean and how they affect the staff?

Malcolm
06-24-2008, 02:25 AM
The true question, what do the symbols in the beginning of a staff mean and how they affect the staff?
The symbols let us know what scale or key (range of sound) the piece is to be played in. Each scale uses different combinations of notes to produce a specific range of sound, i.e. the C scale would use these notes --- C D E F G A B C and the E scale would use these notes --- E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D#, E. Because they use different notes this makes the song have a different --- I'll use the word "tone".

Some people sing best in the key of C. That is a range of sound that they find comfortable, i.e. they can hit all the high notes as well as all the low notes. However, some people prefer the key of E -- for them this range of sound fits them best. Some instruments, horns, sax, etc prefer the flat keys. Those symbols tell them at a glance this piece is not necessarly in their favorite range.

So...... those symbols tell the vocalist that this piece of music as written falls into a certain range of sound. The vocalist then decides to use this music as written or has it transposed into a key she/he prefers.

As to how those symbols affect the staff, they do not, except if the symbol indicated that this song is to be played in the key of F the flat symbol will intersect the B staff line. This indicates that the B note should be flatted or changed into a Bb (B flat) note through out the song. Why? The F scale is F, G, A, Bb, C, D, E, F and to produce that "tone" you need to insert the Bb note into the scale.

Why not just go ahead and print the notes with the correct sharp or flat notation, i.e. C#, G# Fb, etc. The staff is just so big, and if you notated all the 4 sharps for the E scale it would make the music very hard to read. So the old guys decided this was a better way.

Hope that answered your question.

magpie74
06-24-2008, 02:37 AM
Easy answer: sharp all your F's, C's, G's and D's.

Just a guess without an instrument in my lap: Moonlight Sonata?

Terratrum
06-24-2008, 02:15 PM
Thank you, I now comfortably understand. I had a feeling that was the reason but I wasn't sure.

leegordo
07-25-2008, 01:14 PM
Leegordo here with alledgedly all the wrong answers to posts and queries! To start with you must be aware that the idea of the of the#s and bs is to indicate what MAJOR scale the music is to be played in!!There are only 12 Major scales in all of music.The simplest Major scale is the one which starts on the note 'C', and-using a piano-the 'C' Major scale is the 6 notes found only on the white keys which lie to the Right of the note'C'......Now Because there are no black notes in the 'C' major scale, it means that a piece of music written in the Key of 'C' will not need to have any sharps or flats printed on the 'staves,'at the beginning of every 'Stave' - pronounced 'Staff'
Now , it must be realised that for different reasons.all music cannot be written in Key'C'. for instance A composer or arranger may Have to choose another Key to write the music in to suit ----Say a vocalist!, or choir........Just Say again. that he chooses to write in Key 'G', then , to keep the major scale of'G' correct, he will have to play ONE black note (on the piano, that is F# )Every time the note 'F' occurs in the music, then the musician playing the piece must remember to play 'F#'.because the printer or arranger is not going to write a'#' before every 'F' that the music dictates-else the page would be literally covered in Accidentals. You can just imagine what a page of music would look like if it was written in key 'F#' with SIX sharps printed every time the Six notes occured?--------Impossible to read!
There are further facts and rules connected with reading and writing music on STAVE , but, I hope this wee piece of advice will be good enough to start you on your way. I have made a concious effort to use only plain English , without any silly big words!!!