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leegordo
05-22-2008, 01:17 PM
I have noticed that a lot a lot of todays' music in the media to introduce Prog's or other material to listeners and viewers, reflects the fact that the guys who create and/or play that stuff have no idea of practical music making!
Almost without exception, their music consists of diatonic basic chords, without any sequence-just random chords, usually simple Triads, like chords I, IV,..V,..VI Occasionally......III and more rarely..II ..And hardly ever VII
Also never any kind of Dom.7th chord , because that would force the arranger/ composer. to resolve to the the next proper chord, and because he does'nt know how to do that, he avoids Dom7ths like the plague
By the way whatever happened to the three steps of' 'Preparation','Suspension' and Resolution? which were commonly used when composing or arranging music? that being the three essential elements harmony-wise that all the greatest music ever composed tried to follow.
It is now called 'sequencing'---Yet another procedure unknown to the present-day 'experts'

Color of Music
07-15-2012, 04:13 AM
I have noticed that a lot a lot of todays' music in the media to introduce Prog's or other material to listeners and viewers, reflects the fact that the guys who create and/or play that stuff have no idea of practical music making!
Almost without exception, their music consists of diatonic basic chords, without any sequence-just random chords, usually simple Triads, like chords I, IV,..V,..VI Occasionally......III and more rarely..II ..And hardly ever VII
Also never any kind of Dom.7th chord , because that would force the arranger/ composer. to resolve to the the next proper chord, and because he does'nt know how to do that, he avoids Dom7ths like the plague
By the way whatever happened to the three steps of' 'Preparation','Suspension' and Resolution? which were commonly used when composing or arranging music? that being the three essential elements harmony-wise that all the greatest music ever composed tried to follow.
It is now called 'sequencing'---Yet another procedure unknown to the present-day 'experts'

You have to consider the genre and even if in said genre, the other chord types are used. What distinguishes the styles is how they're voiced.

And who says one needs 7ths or extensions to make a song? Almost every children's tune is quite basic. Did the composers who wrote them completely ignoring embellishment? No, because it is not always needed.

Preparation is there is today's music; it isn't being used in the classical strict sense. Simple songs don't need them and usually it should be up to the listener to figure out the preparation. As you said with a dominant seventh, movement of a fourth (upwards) isn't always done since they often act as pivot chords when talking modulations. Harmonic functionality.

Just because it isn't used in the most extreme of levels doesn't mean it's not being used nor does it mean that its not understood.

F#m, B, Em, A is still functioning properly as is this: F#m7-B7b9-B7#5b9-Em9-A7#5#9-A7#5b9.

Will you get a different sound? You bet; however, it's still a song if it isn't used.

There are other forms of creating tension and release in music.

Just because it isn't used in the most extreme of levels doesn't mean it's not being used nor does it mean that its not understood. The above progressions may not fit in a particular song; however, it comes down to what the composer wants.

If it's simple triads, s/he isn't (necessarily) clueless about extensions, alterations, etc, s/he wasn't going for it.

It the same deal with "today's songs" that get criticized for having "un-intelligent" lyrics. Not every song is about a life-changing event nor should be.

(ie: "As long as it has a good beat") and the over-generalization that modern music isn't for the above average person while classical music isn't for the average or below average person. Those are grossly untrue.

There's who you want to cater to, but to make such over-generalizations is uncalled for.

And consider that maybe it's personal/identification thing. If the classical behemoths had it, why can't today's composers (and they don't need to try to emulate those behemoths)?

Everybody cannot write symphonies (how ever it's done) and those that can, don't snap his or her fingers and is able to do it. And it's not everybody intention to write symphonies even if they have the ability.