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View Full Version : thick pik or really thick pik



Guitar_Bizar
04-22-2003, 08:52 PM
I want pik opinions with shredding. I hear alot of shredders
tear it up thicker the pik. :confused:

Wyll_Watts
04-22-2003, 10:03 PM
Many players prefer a really thick pick because the tip does not bend givng a cleaner attack and allowing better feel for where the tip of the pick is. Alternately, you could use a pick that is made of a harder material that will not bend even though it is cut to a thinner overall thickness. Picks made of lexan will be stiff even when cut thin as will several other materials. But keep in mind that many other characteristics of the pick will affect the sound, such as beveling, sharpness, overall size, composition, the angle you hold it at etc..

On acoustic I use triangular Claton Ultem picks that I polish and bevel for a certain sound I like for bluegrass and similar styles. For jazz on acoustic I use Wegen gypsy jazz and bluegrass picks.
On electric I use Dunlop Tortex Sharps, 1.5mm, with a custom edge.

..but, you know, experiment with a bunch of picks till you find something you like..

Wyll

EricV
04-23-2003, 01:50 AM
There are several picks I like to use:

Jazz III- very durable. If you donīt like the size of it, check out the Jazz III XL. I actually prefer the red ones, Thorsten likes the black ones better, AFAIK ( the surfaces are slightly different, at least IMHO )

Dunlop Delrin 1.5- The "Yngwie"-pick. He uses those kinda picks. The ones I use are filed to a different shape / size. A bit smaller, like a wider Jazz III...

Dunlop Stubbys- A friend of mine uses those, he says theyīre perfect for shredding. I think he uses 2 mm ones !

Pickboy Jazz- Used those for 2 or 3 years. Perfect size, pretty thick.

I think that a heavy pick helps to increase speed ( Wyll explained why ), and I personally think I have a bit more control with a heavy pick.
Eric

Bongo Boy
04-23-2003, 03:00 AM
I picked up a bunch of Dunlop Gator Grip picks--they're 1,5mm and I think, very stiff. Not sure what the material it is, but the finish is somewhat like porcelain. They're "full-sized", which for me is good--I love 'em. I also found that they come out of the bag with no 'flash' around the edges (that annoying residual feather-edge that comes from the molding process that you have to file off, especially on the Nylon picks).

Wyll_Watts
04-23-2003, 02:47 PM
the Dunlop stubbys Eric mentioned are one of the few brands of lexan picks I've seen. They have a great feel that I would say is perfect for shredding, but the attack is a bit bright. I used to use them alot but they never really had the grind I wanted for rhythm playing and were too bright on acoustic, but for electric lead they seem to be one of the best. I purchased some sheet lexan to use for laboratory counter shields and portable dance surfaces and made a few picks from the leftovers. Pretty good results, but it seems that dunlop is using one the other variations (I'll spare the chemical details lol..)

Dunlop has also recently been pushing their new Ultex picks which seem to be their answer to the Clayton Ultem Gold picks that pretty much dominate alot of the bluegrass and acoustic scene. Both of them are about as close as you can get to real tortise shell picks, and antique tortise shell is getting harder to come by and getting more expensive. Excuse the rambling, I'm a certified pick junkie.

Wyll

EricV
08-10-2003, 02:29 PM
Originally posted by Bongo Boy
I picked up a bunch of Dunlop Gator Grip picks--they're 1,5mm and I think, very stiff. Not sure what the material it is, but the finish is somewhat like porcelain. They're "full-sized", which for me is good--I love 'em. I also found that they come out of the bag with no 'flash' around the edges (that annoying residual feather-edge that comes from the molding process that you have to file off, especially on the Nylon picks).

One thing I do with many fresh picks is I take it and rub each side of it on a carpet once... very quickly. Takes about a second. The pick gets rather hot that way, and that "feather-edge" is gone afterwards. It kinda smooths out the edges a bit.
Eric

Koala
08-10-2003, 02:46 PM
Originally posted by EricV
One thing I do with many fresh picks is I take it and rub each side of it on a carpet once... very quickly. Takes about a second. The pick gets rather hot that way, and that "feather-edge" is gone afterwards. It kinda smooths out the edges a bit.
Eric

Nice advice Eric! Ive been playing with Dunlop Nylon Heavys forever, theyre hard but have just a tad bit of flexibility which allows for adding great dynamics.

Cuno
08-10-2003, 03:02 PM
I found this great pick, gotta share it. Itīs the POS-A-GRIP XH (what a name, eh?). Itīs full size, or even a little wider than ordinary full size pics. Itīs like it was made for my (slightly oversized) fingers. The 'grabbing area' is drilled a lot of holes for better grip. Itīs stiff and has no 'flash' at all.
I used to use the Dunlop green tortex, and this new pos-a-grip is way more durable. Donīt know what material it is.

I also tried the Brain pics. It has a really rugged grip. It almost feels like itīs glued to your fingers. But that is too much grip for me, it should be able to move a bit.

Anyway, POS-A-GRIP. Check em out!

EricV
08-10-2003, 03:09 PM
I change the type of pick I use every once in a while. But I always find myself going back to Jazz IIIīs in between. They offer both a nice attack and a good picking-tone ( if you donīt like too much "pick-noise", try Jazz IIīs )
I recently got my hand on some of those Ibanez Paul Gilbert-picks. Theyīre GREAT for fast picking, but for some reason I donīt like their overall sound. And... they are not very durable. I went through about 10 picks in about a week.
So, for fast picking and a nice tone, Iīd recommend:

1. Dunlop Jazz III
2. Dunlop Delrin 1.5 ( as mentioned before, I file them down to a different, smaller shape )
3. Pickboy Jazz
4. Dunlop 1.14 mm ( purple, filed down as well )
5. Ibanez Paul Gilbert signature pick, white ( blue ones sound a tidbit different and have a slightly different feel IMHO )
Eric

B A Stone
08-11-2003, 12:23 AM
Personally, I just use a pick that's thick enough not to "give" when I hit the string. I use Dunlop 1.14's (for now). They do the job for me. I actually prefer the sound and feel of celluloid picks, but I wear them out real quick.

Shaun
08-11-2003, 01:39 AM
I use the ibanez 'hikizume' white 1.20mm picks. (Paul Gilbert size) They have great tone to it but it kinda wears off real fast. Maybe I'll switch to Jazz IIIs.

tom_hogan
08-11-2003, 10:08 PM
88mm dunlo[p jeesus i use well light ones i used to use the tickest but i dont ne more coz i find that my tone ( through my hands ) is comprimised

min7b5
08-12-2003, 02:43 PM
Golden Gate picks. Very heavy and very round.

Wyll_Watts
08-12-2003, 10:44 PM
funny you should mention the Golden Gate pick.. I assume you mean the very round mock ts shell one that is like 2mm or so thick.. that pick is based on a TS pick used by the mandolin player David Grisman.. it used to be his signature pick (they were once made in the "clown barf" pattern..).. he has a different one now that it pretty much the same shape but has a little better edge.. they make tremelo on the mandolin very smooth and can give a huge sound on guitar with practice.. have you tried filing a bevel into the edge? gives a little more bite without ruining the feel.. very good picks..

Wyll

min7b5
08-13-2003, 03:42 AM
I havn't filed them, I love them just they way they are. It takes some getting used to, but it sure sounds a whole lot better. I know SRV and David Grier come to mind as players with that "round end of a pick" sound.

Otto
09-29-2003, 05:09 AM
2 questions

Are there any disadvantages to a heavy pick?

Which picks on the market would you guys consider to be most durable?

Shaun
09-30-2003, 02:27 AM
To me, the only disadvantage a heavy pick has is the is the funny 'trrakk' sound it makes when strumming on an acoustic guitar. Heavy picks are used widely among electric guitarists because of the pick's natural ability of direct response to the strings. Meaning: the pick doesn't bend when it hits a string as thin picks do. This 'phenomenon' :rolleyes: is due to the pick's sloppyness. A heavy pick, because it is hard, does not bend and gives you maximum accuracy when picking reeeaally fast.

Wyll_Watts
09-30-2003, 02:46 AM
hey there..

some disadvantages of thick picks.. Depending on the material and the edge, a thick pick can mute the tone a bit.. some like this warm sound.. but you lose some 'attack'.. this isn't the case with all thick picks, but it is with many... Also, some find a thick pick a little awkward to hold, but it isn't that hard to get used to.. People like thick picks for the extra picking accuracy, but be aware that there are some stiff picks that can give you that accuracy without being really thick.. The Jazz III really isn't that thick but its size and stiffness allow accurate picking.. with most materials a thickness of 1.0 - 1.5mm will give you pleanty of accuracy with little loss of attack, of course it depends on how the edge is shaped too.. for example, 2.0mm Tortex Sharps still give pleanty of bite..

as far as durability.. I think alot of people will lose a pick before they really wear it down.. and most of the materials out there are pretty durable.. but if you really stick with a pick for a while you can wear it down depending on your string material, gauge and how hard you pick.. One of the most durable picks out there is the Dunlop Stubby series which are made of Lexan.. very hard and stiff, but many people think it has too bright of a tone.. if you are into shredding, the Dunlop Jazz III is a safe bet, and should meet most of your picking needs.. on acoustic I recommend Clayton Gold 1.2mm, Wegen custom picks, Tortise Shell (legal old harvest), or Dunlop Ultem...

but, it's really up to you to decide what feels and sounds right to you.. try everything..

Oh, I think D'Andrea makes a pick made of Spectra.. a really stiff and durable material.. might want to check those out too..

Wyll

Otto
09-30-2003, 04:54 AM
Thanx man. You really helped me out.

Otto
09-30-2003, 04:58 AM
I think I'm gonna go give those Jazz III's a whirl. I've heard a lot of good things about them from members of this site.
There are seriously way too many picks out there!

SillyCone
09-30-2003, 12:35 PM
Certainly go for the Jazz III, they are amazing (even for n00bs like me :). What I like about them is that the end is pointy, not round like many others, and it gives a very nice clean attack. If hold lightly, it strums pretty well too.
Although one complain I have about them is that I have to file most of them down coz the 2 sides aren't often glued symetrically. Ok, maybe it's my guitar shop batch of Jazz III that's wrong, but even then, at twice the price of the standard Dunlops...

I liked the white Ibanez with the japanese signs on them - they're pointy too, but as said before on this same post (if talking about the same pick), they wear off VERY fast, too fast if you're playing seriously (but maybe you got a deal with Ibanez and buy them by kilos ;)

I tried also some aluminium pick (someone on this forum talked about them a few weeks/months ago - can't remember their names). I loved the idea and the feeling of the pick in my hand (thin but hard), but on anything other than nylon strings (not even the wounded nylon ones) they "attach" to the string, making a totally unbearable scratchy noise.

My 2 cents.
SillyPick.

Shaun
10-01-2003, 02:29 AM
Hey, about the Jazz IIIs. Are they the big black ones or are they the small red ones? I've tried them but they tend to rub or cling on to the strings (if u know what i mean).

Wyll_Watts
10-01-2003, 02:35 AM
Jazz III come in red and black, and two sizes.. a small jazz "teardrop" size and a slightly larger variation...
about them rubbing or clinging against the strings.. if you switch over to them after using normal sized picks, you may be using too deep of a pick stroke, use only the very, very, tip with the Jazz IIIs.. if you are not using too deep of a stroke then maybe that pick just isn't for you.. but there are thousands of others waiting to be tried out.. try the Dunlop Little Stubby 1.0 mm, (clear lexan) similar to the Jazz III...

Wyll