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Finsta
11-27-2006, 02:03 AM
So here I am. I'm a high-school student, yadda-yadda - I'm sure you've heard it. Along with my studies, I've pushed off serious guitar playing. It's odd, I want to play but I cannot. I keep on telling myself that I want to and that I will, comes time I don't. I'm the type of person who likes efficiency and proficiency (Which I lack along with patience) so I get frustrated very easily. I've read EricV's articles such as Do Not Disturb [If you're reading this Eric, I tried responding to your emails but I don't know if they've reached you or you didn't bother to respond:p] and have always thought of making a practice schedule and getting myself to start to learn and absorb. My problems lie in this, I can't seem to get myself to play. I've singled it out as a chore or something that I dread now, and I want to undo that. The second issue is that I want to learn a lot of things and be an all around versitile and competant musician [You've heard the story over and over, and I like a variety of genres] but I have nowhere to begin without over-burdening myself. Help, anybody?:(

Sentinel
12-01-2006, 02:30 AM
I was the same way. I'd really want to become a good player, so I'd come up with a practice schedule and stick with it...for about two weeks. :(

Now I can sit down and practice my entire schedule almost every day. I try to do it every day, but things do come up. However, if I have to stay up later or get up earlier and practice before work, then I do.

I used to think of it as a chore. Then I realised that I wasn't doing enough playing to go along with my practicing. All I was doing was mindless exercises, and I wasn't having any fun. Sure, I noticed improvement in my playing, but it got to the point where it was like, "Oh, yeah, I have to get in my practice today." With that kind of attitude, a lot of days went by without any practicing.

Another problem was that I had no goals, other then "I want to be a better player". Now, I have a new home studio, and I plan on recording a CD next summer. I've set short term and long term goals.

If I've had a long day at work, or whatever, and practicing feels like a chore that day, then I'll just do some playing, jamming along with songs, etc.

joeyd929
12-01-2006, 02:37 AM
I was the same way. I'd really want to become a good player, so I'd come up with a practice schedule and stick with it...for about two weeks. :(

Now I can sit down and practice my entire schedule almost every day. I try to do it every day, but things do come up. However, if I have to stay up later or get up earlier and practice before work, then I do.

I used to think of it as a chore. Then I realised that I wasn't doing enough playing to go along with my practicing. All I was doing was mindless exercises, and I wasn't having any fun. Sure, I noticed improvement in my playing, but it got to the point where it was like, "Oh, yeah, I have to get in my practice today." With that kind of attitude, a lot of days went by without any practicing.

Another problem was that I had no goals, other then "I want to be a better player". Now, I have a new home studio, and I plan on recording a CD next summer. I've set short term and long term goals.

If I've had a long day at work, or whatever, and practicing feels like a chore that day, then I'll just do some playing, jamming along with songs, etc.

Ever hear the joke, "how many Psychiatrists does it take to change a light bulb? Answer.. One,,,but the light bulb has to "want" to change..

What I am saying is that if you want to play bad enough you will make time and sacrifice. Learn one thing at a time and like I told my wife, you have to accept what ever skill lever you are at in the present tense.

Once you realize that it takes time and over time you see improvements but you have to want it bad enough.....It drives my very being sometimes...can't get enough and when I have had enough I put it down for a day and have to go back...passion, desire,,it's like a love affair....with wood and strings......Nuff said.

Finsta
12-01-2006, 03:27 AM
I was the same way. I'd really want to become a good player, so I'd come up with a practice schedule and stick with it...for about two weeks. :(

Now I can sit down and practice my entire schedule almost every day. I try to do it every day, but things do come up. However, if I have to stay up later or get up earlier and practice before work, then I do.

I used to think of it as a chore. Then I realised that I wasn't doing enough playing to go along with my practicing. All I was doing was mindless exercises, and I wasn't having any fun. Sure, I noticed improvement in my playing, but it got to the point where it was like, "Oh, yeah, I have to get in my practice today." With that kind of attitude, a lot of days went by without any practicing.

Another problem was that I had no goals, other then "I want to be a better player". Now, I have a new home studio, and I plan on recording a CD next summer. I've set short term and long term goals.

If I've had a long day at work, or whatever, and practicing feels like a chore that day, then I'll just do some playing, jamming along with songs, etc.

Sounds very much like me in the first regard. How'd you overcome the hurdle so to speak? And out of curiousity, where you from? I'm from Montreal...Hurray Canada:cool:

Sentinel
12-01-2006, 05:29 AM
I'm from northern BC, and yes, hurray Canada! :)

I overcame my hurdle by getting rid of distractions. I'm easily distracted, so cable tv had to go. As much as I love tv, it wasn't helping me with guitar playing.

I also have the desire to make a CD, and it was just one of those moments where I looked in the mirror and said "Ok, this is it. You're going to do it. No more slacking off."

Not that it was always easy to sit down and practice, but I was more consistent with my practices and I was much more focused. If it meant not doing certain things, then I just didn't do them. I just cut out stuff that wasn't as important.

The bottom line is that I knew what I wanted to accomplish, and I let my desire for that goal light the fire under my *** to get cracking. And as I became a better player, the desire just kept growing.

Other things such as changing my practice schedule when I became bored with it, working on different techniques from time to time, and writing music worked to keep things from feeling stale, and I was able to keep my focus.

Also, I was always trying to rush things. I used to raise the metronome to often for speed exercises. I would be struggling to keep up and that frustrated me, and I'd be like "Oh my God, I'll never get better." So it was a mental/physical thing.

Now that I'm only raising it a couple bpm every 5 days, my fingers are always comfortable, and I don't feel like I'm struggling to keep up. I'm happy with the progress I've made, and I'm in no hurry to get faster. Speed will come with time and perfect practice.