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korg
07-03-2006, 08:17 AM
Hi

I started to play the piano one year ago with a private classical teacher who teachs me a lot of classical pieces from Bach, Bürgmuller, Bartók, Schumann, Clementi and so on and a lot of things about fingerrings, major scales, pedal and so on. Here where I live there is no jazz teacher and what I want is to play Jazz so many times I read jazz lesson stuff by myself. I have read a lot about intervals, scales, modes, progressions ii-V-I, not playing roots on righthand ;) and so on and I also play scores from the hanon as a warmup exercises and the major scales in all the keys.

But my question is, Is there any guideline for beginners to know what to study first? For example: major triads and inversions in all keys, then major scales, modes, seventh's... I can make the question in another way, If you were a jazz piano teacher, what will you teach first to your students?

What I want to know is where should I focus my efforts.

Sorry by my english faults and thanks in advance.

Jordi (from Canary Islands, Spain)

Malcolm
07-03-2006, 03:14 PM
You may want to also ask that question on the following site.Click here to go to that site... (http://jazzbooks.thecodeworks.com/forums.asp) Click on Jazz discussions.

korg
07-03-2006, 06:14 PM
Thank you. I'll take a look to it :)

gerloffmk
07-21-2006, 03:30 PM
There are alot of Jazz piano books out there, and the best bet if you are going to self-teach yourself jazz, is to go to a bookstore and flip through the pages to find one that looks cool to you. I mean if you look at some great-jazz-do-it-yourself book and it looks really boring, then it probably is going to be boring. Also, try to find a book with a CD or DVD with it. Alot of jazz is hearing how it is supposed to be played (swing-jazz, attacks, syncopation, etc).A book I like is "Improvising Jazz Piano" by John Mehegan. There is no CD, but it is pretty straight forward. It is also a book you can show your classical teachers about if you get confused. They SHOULD be able to help even if they have no jazz knowledge:)

Hope this helps!

joeyd929
07-27-2006, 12:56 AM
Hi

I started to play the piano one year ago with a private classical teacher who teachs me a lot of classical pieces from Bach, Bürgmuller, Bartók, Schumann, Clementi and so on and a lot of things about fingerrings, major scales, pedal and so on. Here where I live there is no jazz teacher and what I want is to play Jazz so many times I read jazz lesson stuff by myself. I have read a lot about intervals, scales, modes, progressions ii-V-I, not playing roots on righthand ;) and so on and I also play scores from the hanon as a warmup exercises and the major scales in all the keys.

But my question is, Is there any guideline for beginners to know what to study first? For example: major triads and inversions in all keys, then major scales, modes, seventh's... I can make the question in another way, If you were a jazz piano teacher, what will you teach first to your students?

What I want to know is where should I focus my efforts.

Sorry by my english faults and thanks in advance.

Jordi (from Canary Islands, Spain)

I would suggest that you study chord construction and analysis and intervals. Check out this site.. www.teoria.com

Lots of training and exercises.

jazzmaniac
08-03-2006, 02:23 AM
¡Hola, KORG! ¿Que tal? No te preocupes, tu Inglés es bién.

I remember when I was still learning piano, my father taught me when I was 5. He taught me the rudiments, how to read notes, staff, clefs, etc. I was introduced to classical music at a very young age at the same time to other sorts of music like Latin (my father loves that stuff), disco, pop, rock, etc. In short, I have a wide range of musical background at home. Then when I grew up I heard some jazz records. I fell in love with that kind of music. I did some more listening and self study. Believe me, my classical piano background with all the theories and technicalities on the piano helped tremendously.

KORG, I suggest you do a lot of listening to this music you seem to show some interest. You can read scores by now, so I think it would also help if you could find some jazz sheet music and study them. Figure out the theory behind it.

Buena suerte, KORG.