Welcome!
Just a few a ground rules first...

Promotion, advertising and link building is not permitted.

If you are keen to learn, get to grips with something with the willing help of one of the net's original musician forums
or possess a genuine willingness to contribute knowledge - you've come to the right place!

Register >

- Close -
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Is readout of music on staff desired as you compose?

  1. #1
    Keyboard User
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Lincoln, CA
    Posts
    5

    Is readout of music on staff desired as you compose?

    Comments on the following will be appreciated: As one composes or arranges a song, is it helpful to see a readout, on a staff, of the notes that one has played on a keyboard? Also, how easily can this be done with a computer? Perhaps this is already done independently of a computer with some Roland digital pianos. In summary, is this a good feature when composing or arranging?

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    485
    not sure what your asking.

    " Is it important to see the notes of the melody on paper when your arranging music? "

    If this is the question. It can be useful if your arranging purely on paper.

    Often I will arrange for an ensemble just by harmonizing the melody on paper, not actually using any instrument as an aid.

    If your sitting at a piano and you know the tune. There is no need to see it written down really. If you can play it, you can arrange it while you play.

    Assuming I understood the question.

  3. #3
    Keyboard User
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Lincoln, CA
    Posts
    5

    Is readout on staff desired as you compose?

    Thank you for your comments. To clarify my question, yes, if you can play it on a keyboard, you can arrange it while you play, but what if you did a fine job in arranging it, and, in addition, want to see accurately what you did on paper afterwards? Then having the keyboard notes played shown on paper can be helpful to reproduce it. Now, having a motive, how easily is this done on a computer?

  4. #4
    Registered User JonR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Twickenham, UK
    Posts
    4,959
    Quote Originally Posted by Ivory
    Thank you for your comments. To clarify my question, yes, if you can play it on a keyboard, you can arrange it while you play, but what if you did a fine job in arranging it, and, in addition, want to see accurately what you did on paper afterwards? Then having the keyboard notes played shown on paper can be helpful to reproduce it. Now, having a motive, how easily is this done on a computer?
    Pretty easily. (I was going to say "very", but computers aren't as infallible or user-friendly as we might wish... )
    You need a MIDI keyboard, and a sequencer program that displays notation.
    You will also need a MIDI lead to connect to the game port on your soundcard - or a separate MIDI interface (most work via USB).

    Most sequencer programs will display notation, but not all do it well (MIDI sequencers use other kinds of display more often). If you really want accurate notation (following all the rules of standard notation), highly editable, formatted well for printing, you need a dedicated notation program, like Finale or Sibelius. These will do exactly what you want (and a whole lot more).

  5. #5
    Keyboard User
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Lincoln, CA
    Posts
    5

    Is readout of music on staff desired as you compose?

    Thank you for the informative information provided above. Now I have a follow-on question. I'm interested in trying to apply the challenges in composing using MIDI as described above, to the extent of buying a Technics digital piano bought new (by the "other" party) about 6 years ago. I have a new computer. Does about 6 years for the digital piano qualify OK for the MIDI input into a new computer?

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    485
    midi input's have had no real miraculous advances. If a device has midi output, it has midi.

    I would worry more about making sure my PC was up to date and had some good sampling software. That is if your after a nice sound's once its on your PC.

    My toy keyboard from about 12 years ago would probably yield the same sounds as a brand new $5000 digital piano. Once the information hits the PC that is. Keep that in mind.

  7. #7
    Registered User JonR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Twickenham, UK
    Posts
    4,959
    Quote Originally Posted by Ivory
    Does about 6 years for the digital piano qualify OK for the MIDI input into a new computer?
    Yes.
    Remember the sounds you get from your computer will not be the sounds from the piano. MIDI is merely digital information about key presses and other settings, that the computer then translates using its own onboard sounds (which will be a standard GM soundset - usable but often cheesy). IOW, your computer treats your piano as basically a bunch of switches - which is why JazzMick said any MIDI keyboard will do.
    However, when you play back a computer MIDI sequence through your piano, it will play back with the piano's own sounds. (And of course, as a pianist, you will want a keyboard that feels good and sounds reasonably close to a piano.)

    As JazzMick says, if you want pro-quality instruments on your computer for arranging purposes (even more so if you're making demo recordings), it would be worth looking into either a hardware module with presets, or sampling software.
    But if you're new to MIDI (I'm pretty new myself ), I'd start with what you have - including a sequencing/notation program - keep it simple, until you get an idea of what else you want.

    Of course, if you're only writing notation, employing the computer merely as your copyist and printer, then the onboard sound quality is neither here nor there. (Pro arrangers worked only with pianos before computers existed... ) But you probably will need high-end notation software, as the cheaper programs (in my experience) can get frustrating and fiddly to use.
    As well as Sibelius and Finale (which both come in a few price ranges, depending how many bells and whistles you want - almost literally ), look at Mozart, the one I started with. It's cheap, and user-friendly in that the author himself answers queries on a user forum and takes suggestions for improvements.
    (I haven't used it for a couple of years now, so I don't know how it's developed.)
    I use Sibelius myself, but I've heard good things about Finale.

    http://www.sibelius.com/products/sibelius/index.html
    http://www.finalemusic.com/store/productoverview.aspx
    http://www.mozart.co.uk/


    BTW, JazzMick - as a relative newbie myself to this - is there specific sampling software you use or would recommend?

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1

    Re:

    I recently recorded my band album. I was in need of several copies of it. So i had done CD Replication . Its great and I'm fully satisfied with it. It is pretty economical as well. Best Of Luck.

  9. #9
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Deep East Texas Piney Woods
    Posts
    3,145
    Getting back to the piece of paper. Pencil or computer keyboard -- whichever way you like best, however, yes one way or the other you have to write it down on a piece of paper.

    I find paper and pencil on the music stand over my keyboard works fine. Next step (which I do not bother with as it's just me and I can play from my pencil notes) would be to take those pencil notes to a publishing software. I tried LillyPad and Guitar Pro. LillyPad is very hard to learn how to use, but, does turn out a good product.

    My point ---- depending on your hobby budget a number two pencil, a good eraser and some paper is really all you need to get started.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by Malcolm; 10-21-2008 at 12:33 PM.

Similar Threads

  1. Giving up Music as a profession.
    By jessmanca in forum Mental Stuff
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 04-14-2013, 06:33 AM
  2. What is important in music?
    By majeh91 in forum Music Theory
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 03-01-2008, 01:05 AM
  3. Usschoolofmusic
    By Koala in forum iBreathe Cafe
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-26-2007, 05:30 PM
  4. Please give me suggestions on how to learn the basics of music.
    By ComposerRyan in forum Getting Started
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-11-2004, 10:42 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •