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Three Guitar-Tips
  

Preface and Tech Tip No.1

Here are three guitar-tips that Steve wrote for the visitors of his website three years ago. Since those posts havent been available for quite a while, Steve allowed us to present them to you at iBreatheMusic, so they are republished here with Steves permission. We also added TABs to visualize what Steves saying in those tech-tips. IMHO those tips are useful for every player, regardless of level and style... theyre not just "licks" but great exercises focusing on several aspects of playing. Enjoy- EV


Steve Morse - Tech Tip No.1 (10-2-1998)
A different approach to practicing scales

Practice the usual scales (as in example 1: a regular minor scale played in 8th notes- EV) a little differently by changing the note values. If you have a scale pattern that normally would be in sixteenth notes, or any even number, try this:

Play the first note as a dotted eighth, the second note as a sixteenth, etc.
(Example 2)



The natural tendency is to try something like this at too fast a tempo to get something out of it. Remember not to lapse into just playing "isungi", or shuffle time, eighth notes. There's a difference between a triplet feel and a hard edged sixteenth note division.

We want to make the difference in length between each note to be clean and obvious. Be sure to play it very slowly and accurately. The benefit will come from the fact that you're shortening and lengthening the time between pick strokes. You see, half the time you're playing eigth notes and the other half of the time you're playing sixteenths. Your accuracy will improve if you slow down enough to play it perfectly with conviction.

For extra credit, switch the pattern to play the sixteenth note first (Example 3), on the strong part of the beat. The pattern will be a little weird, but you'll get used to it if you play it slowly at first.




Steve Morse - Tech Tip No.2 >>