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Moving From The Familiar To The Unfamiliar Part 2
  

In this article, we will move from familiar Minor Pentatonic patterns to less familiar Arpeggios. Since most guitarists know the root position of the Minor Pentatonic, it will be used as a reference. The fingering pattern most common for this is 1-4,1-3,1-3,1-3,1-4,1-4 from lowest pitch E to highest pitch E string.

This time we will use the familiar Minor Pentatonic scale to demystify some fingerings for arpeggios.

Theory: Lets analyze the Minor Pentatonic as a five note chord:

1 b3 5 b7 4

A C D E G rearrange the notes as A C E G D this is an Amin7/11 or Amin7sus4 chord.

The plan is to modify one note of the Pent at a time to obtain an arpeggio of some useful chords.


1 3 5 b7 4

First lets raise the C to C#; A C# E G D which creates A7/11 or A7sus4.
This is useful for eastern sounds in lieu of the Mixolydian Mode for Dom7 chords.
Root at 5th fret:




1 3 5 b7 9

Now, from the original A Minor Pent, lets lower the G to an F#; D F# A C E which creates a D9.
This is useful for the IV chord in Blues Progressions, in this case D9 in the key of A.
Root at 5th fret:




1 3 5 b7 4

Now lets raise the E to an F#; D F# A C G which creates D7/11 or D7sus4.
This is useful for the IV chord in Blues Progressions, in this case D7 in the key of A.
Root at 5th fret:



This process can be applied to every note one note at a time of the Pentatonic.
This creates fourteen other possibilities as shown below.

Modify the root: second note: third note: fourth note: fifth note:
Original Pent shown in bold

root           second note    third note     fourth note    fifth note
Ab C D E G A Bb D E G A C Db E G A C D Eb G A C D E F
A C D E G A B D E G* A C D E G A C D E G A C D E F#
Bb C D E G A C D E G A C D# E G A C D F G* A C D E G
B C D E G A C# D E G A C D F# G A C D E G#

The two marked with stars are E Minor Pent and D Minor Pent.

I’ll leave the rest up to your own curiosity to decide what to name them and where to use them. Explore!
 

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